Fusion Middleware

Command Line and Vim Tips from a Java Programmer

I’m always interested in learning more about useful development tools. In college, most programmers get an intro to the Linux command line environment, but I wanted to share some commands I use daily that I’ve learned since graduation.

Being comfortable on the command line is a great skill to have when a customer is looking over your shoulder on a Webex. They could be watching a software demo or deployment to their environment. It can also be useful when learning a new code base or working with a product with a large, unfamiliar directory structure with lots of logs.

If you’re on Windows, you can use Cygwin to get a Unix-like CLI to make these commands available.

Useful Linux commands Find

The command find helps you find files by recursively searching subdirectories. Here are some examples:

find .
    Prints all files and directories under the current directory.

find . -name '*.log'
  Prints all files and directories that end in “.log”.

find /tmp -type f -name '*.log'
   Prints only files in the directory “/tmp” that end in “.log”.

find . -type d
   Prints only directories.

find . -maxdepth 2
     Prints all files and directories under the current directory, and subdirectories (but not sub-subdirectories).

find . -type f -exec ls -la {} \;
     The 
-exec
flag runs a command against each file instead of printing the name. In this example, it will run 
ls -la filename
  on each file under the current directory. The curly braces take the place of the filename.

Grep

The command grep lets you search text for lines that match a specific string. It can be helpful to add your initials to debug statements in your code and then grep for them to find them in the logs.

grep foo filename
  Prints each line in the file “filename” that matches the string “foo”.

grep foo\\\|bar filename
Grep supports regular expressions, so this prints each line in the file that matches “foo” or “bar”.

grep -i foo filename
  Add -i for case insensitive matching.

grep foo *
  Use the shell wildcard, an asterisk, to search all files in the current directory for the string “foo”.

grep -r foo *
  Recursively search all files and directories in the current directory for a string.

grep -rnH foo filename
  Add -n to print line numbers and -H to print the filename on each line.

find . -type f -name '*.log' -exec grep -nH foo {} \;
  Combining find and grep can let you easily search each file that matches a certain name for a string. This will print each line that matches “foo” along with the file name and line number in each file that ends in “.log” under the current directory.

ps -ef | grep processName
  The output of any command can be piped to grep, and the lines of STDOUT that match the expression will be printed. For example, you could use this to find the pid of a process with a known name.

cat file.txt | grep -v foo
  You can also use -v to print all lines that don’t match an expression.

Ln

The command ln lets you create links. I generally use this to create links in my home directory to quickly cd into long directory paths.

ln -s /some/really/long/path foo
  The -s is for symbolic, and the long path is the target. The output of
ls -la
 in this case would be
foo -> /some/really/long/path
 .

Bashrc

The Bashrc is a shell script that gets executed whenever Bash is started in an interactive terminal. It is located in your home directory,

~/.bashrc
 . It provides a place to edit your $PATH, $PS1, or add aliases and functions to simplify commonly used tasks.

Aliases are a way you can define your own command line commands. Here are a couple useful aliases I’ve added to my .bashrc that have saved a lot of keystrokes on a server where I’ve installed Oracle WebCenter:

WC_DOMAIN=/u01/oracle/fmw/user_projects/domains/wc_domain
alias assets="cd /var/www/html"
alias portalLogs="cd $WC_DOMAIN/servers/WC_Spaces/logs"
alias domain="cd $WC_DOMAIN"
alias components="cd $WC_DOMAIN/ucm/cs/custom"
alias rpl="portalLogs; vim -R WC_Spaces.out"

After making changes to your .bashrc, you can load them with

source ~/.bashrc
 . Now I can type
rpl
 , short for Read Portal Logs, from anywhere to quickly jump into the WebCenter portal log file.

alias grep=”grep --color”

This grep alias adds the –color option to all of my grep commands.  All of the above grep commands still work, but now all of the matches will be highlighted.

Vim

Knowing Vim key bindings can be convenient and efficient if you’re already working on the command line. Vim has many built-in shortcuts to make editing files quick and easy.

Run 

vim filename.txt
  to open a file in Vim. Vim starts in Normal Mode, where most characters have a special meeting, and typing a colon,
:
 , lets you run Vim commands. For example, typing 
Shift-G
  will jump to the end of the file, and typing
:q
 while in normal mode will quit Vim. Here is a list of useful commands:

:q
  Quits Vim

:w
  Write the file (save)

:wq
  Write and quit

:q!
  Quit and ignore warnings that you didn’t write the file

:wq!
  Write and quit, ignoring permission warnings

i
  Enter Insert Mode where you can edit the file like a normal text editor

a
  Enter Insert Mode and place the cursor after the current character

o
  Insert a blank line after the current line and enter Insert Mode

[escape]
  The escape button exits insert mode

:150
  Jump to line 150

shift-G
  Jump to the last line

gg
  Jump to the first line

/foo
  Search for the next occurrence of “foo”. Regex patterns work in the search.

?foo
  Search for the previous occurrence of “foo”

n
  Go to the next match

N
Go to the previous match

*
  Search for the next occurrence of the searched word under the cursor

#
  Search for the previous occurrence of the searched word under the cursor

w
  Jump to the next word

b
  Jump to the previous word

``
  Jump to the last action

dw
  Delete the word starting at the cursor

cw
  Delete the word starting at the cursor and enter insert mode

c$
  Delete everything from the cursor to the end of the line and enter insert mode

dd
  Delete the current line

D
  Delete everything from the cursor to the end of the line

u
  Undo the last action

ctrl-r
 
ctrl-r
  Redo the last action

d[up]
  Delete the current line and the line above it. “[up]” is for the up arrow.

d[down]
  Delete the current line and the line below it

d3[down]
  Delete the current line and the three lines below it

r[any character]
  Replace the character under the cursor with another character

~
  Toggle the case (upper or lower) of the character under the cursor

v
  Enter Visual Mode. Use the arrow keys to highlight text.

shift-V
  Enter Visual Mode and highlight whole lines at a time.

ctrl-v
  Enter Visual Mode but highlight blocks of characters.

=
  While in Visual Mode, = will auto format highlighted text.

c
  While in Visual Mode, c will cut the highlighted text.

y
  While in Visual Mode, y will yank (copy) the highlighted text.

p
  In Normal Mode, p will paste the text in the buffer (that’s been yanked or cut).

yw
  Yank the text from the cursor to the end of the current word.

:sort
  Highlight lines in Visual Mode, then use this command to sort them alphabetically.

:s/foo/bar/g
  Highlight lines in Visual Mode, then use search and replace to replace all instances of “foo” with “bar”.

:s/^/#/
  Highlight lines in Visual Mode, then add # at the start of each line. This is useful to comment out blocks of code.

:s/$/;/
Highlight lines in Visual Mode, then add a semicolon at the end of each line.

:set paste
  This will turn off auto indenting. Use it before pasting into Vim from outside the terminal (you’ll want to be in insert mode before you paste).

:set nopaste
  Make auto indenting return to normal.

:set nu
  Turn on line numbers.

:set nonu
  Turn off line numbers.

:r!pwd
  Read the output of a command into Vim. In this example, we’ll read in the current directory.

:r!sed -n 5,10p /path/to/file
  Read lines 5 through 10 from another file in Vim. This can be a good way to copy and paste between files in the terminal.

:[up|down]
  Type a colon and then use the arrow keys to browse through your command history. If you type letters after the colon, it will only go through commands that matched that. (i.e., :se  and then up would help find to “:set paste” quickly).

Vimrc

The Vimrc is a configuration file that Vim loads whenever it starts up, similar to the Bashrc. It is in your home directory.

Here is a basic Vimrc I’d recommend for getting started if you don’t have one already. Run

vim ~/.vimrc
and paste in the following:

set backspace=2         " backspace in insert mode works like normal editor
syntax on               " syntax highlighting
filetype indent on      " activates indenting for files
set autoindent          " auto indenting
set number              " line numbers
colorscheme desert      " colorscheme desert
set listchars=tab:>-,trail:.,extends:>,precedes:<
set list                " Set up whitespace characters
set ic                  " Ignore case by default in searches
set statusline+=%F      " Show the full path to the file
set laststatus=2        " Make the status line always visible

 

Perl

Perl comes installed by default on Linux, so it is worth mentioning that it has some extensive command line capabilities. If you have ever tried to grep for a string that matches a line in a minified Javascript file, you can probably see the benefit of being able to filter out lines longer than 500 characters.

grep -r foo * | perl -nle'print if 500 > length'

Conclusion

I love learning the tools that are available in my development environment, and it is exciting to see how they can help customers as well.

Recently, I was working with a customer and we were running into SSL issues. Java processes can be run with the option 

-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/path/to/trustStore.jks
  to specify which keystore to use for SSL certificates. It was really easy to run
ps -ef | grep trustStore
to quickly identify which keystore we needed to import certificates into.

I’ve also been able to use various find and grep commands to search through unfamiliar directories after exporting metadata from Oracle’s MDS Repository.

Even if you aren’t on the command line, I’d encourage everyone to learn something new about their development environment. Feel free to share your favorite Vim and command line tips in the comments!

Further reading

http://www.vim.org/docs.php

https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html

http://perldoc.perl.org/perlrun.html

The post Command Line and Vim Tips from a Java Programmer appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Webinar Recording: Ryan Companies Leverages Fishbowl’s ControlCenter for Oracle WebCenter to Enhance Document Control Leading to Improved Knowledge Management

On Thursday, December 8th, Fishbowl had the privilege of presenting a webinar with Mike Ernst – VP of Contruction Operations – at Ryan Companies regarding their use case for Fishbowl’s ControlCenter product for controlled document management. Mike was joined by Fishbowl’s ControlCenter product manager, Kim Negaard, who provided an overview of how the solution was implemented and how it is being used at Ryan.

Ryan Companies had been using Oracle WebCenter for many years, but they were looking for some additional document management functionality and a more intuitive interface to help improve knowledge management at the company. Their main initiative was to make it easier for users to access and manage their corporate knowledge documents (policies and procedures), manuals (safety), and real estate documents (leases) throughout each document’s life cycle.

Mike provided some interesting stats that factored into their decision to implement ControlCenter for WebCenter:

  • $16k – the average cost of “reinventing” procedures per project (ex. checklists and templates)
  • $25k – the average cost of estimating incorrect labor rates
  • 3x – salary to onboard someone new when an employee leaves the company

To hear more about how Ryan found knowledge management success with ControlCenter for WebCenter, watch the webinar recording: https://youtu.be/_NNFRV1LPaY

The post Webinar Recording: Ryan Companies Leverages Fishbowl’s ControlCenter for Oracle WebCenter to Enhance Document Control Leading to Improved Knowledge Management appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Webinar: Quality, Safety, Knowledge Management with Oracle WebCenter Content and ControlCenter

DATE: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2016
TIME: 10:00 A.M. PST / 1:00 P.M. EST

Join Ryan Companies Vice President of Construction Operations, Mike Ernst, and Fishbowl Solutions Product Manager, Kim Negaard, to learn how Ryan Companies, a leading national construction firm, found knowledge management success with ControlCenter for Oracle WebCenter Content.

In this webinar, you’ll hear first-hand how ControlCenter has been implemented as part of Ryan’s Integrated Project Delivery Process helping them create a robust knowledge management system to promote consistent and effective operations across multiple regional offices. You’ll also learn how ControlCenter’s intuitive, modern user experience enabled Ryan to easily find documents across devices, implement reoccurring review cycles, and control both company-wide and project-specific documents throughout their lifecycle.

Register today.

Register

 

 

The post Webinar: Quality, Safety, Knowledge Management with Oracle WebCenter Content and ControlCenter appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Approaches to Consider for Your Organization’s Windchill Consolidation Project

This post comes from Fishbowl Solutions’ Senior Solutions Architect, Seth Richter.

More and more organizations need to merge multiple Windchill instances into a single Windchill instance after either acquiring another company or maybe had separate Windchill implementations based on old divisional borders. Whatever the situation, these organizations want to merge into a single Windchill instance to gain efficiencies and/or other benefits.

The first task for a company in this situation is to assemble the right team and develop the right plan. The team will need to understand the budget and begin to document key requirements and its implications. Will they hire an experienced partner like Fishbowl Solutions? If so, we recommend involving the partner early on in the process so they can help navigate the key decisions, avoid pitfalls and develop the best approach for success.

Once you start evaluating the technical process and tools to merge the Windchill instances, the most likely options are:

1. Manual Method

Moving data from one Windchill system to another manually is always an option. This method might be viable if there are small pockets of data to move in an ad-hoc manner. However, this method is extremely time consuming so proceed with caution…if you get halfway through and then move to a following method then you might have hurt the process rather than help it.

2. Third Party Tools (Fishbowl Solutions LinkExtract & LinkLoader tools)

This process can be a cost effective alternative, but it is not as robust as the Windchill Bulk Migrator so your requirements might dictate if this is viable or not.

3. PTC Windchill Bulk Migrator (WBM) tool

This is a powerful, complex tool that works great if you have an experienced team running it. Fishbowl prefers the PTC Windchill Bulk Migrator in many situations because it can complete large merge projects over a weekend and historical versions are also included in the process.

A recent Fishbowl project involved a billion-dollar manufacturing company who had acquired another business and needed to consolidate CAD data from one Windchill system into their own. The project had an aggressive timeline because it needed to be completed before the company’s seasonal rush (and also be prepared for an ERP integration). During the three-month project window, we kicked off the project, executed all of the test migrations and validations, scheduled a ‘go live’ date, and then completed the final production migration over a weekend. Users at the acquired company checked their data into their “old” Windchill system on a Friday and were able check their data out of the main corporate instance on Monday with zero engineer downtime.

Fishbowl Solutions’ PTC/PLM team has completed many Windchill merge projects such as this one. The unique advantage of working with Fishbowl is that we are  PTC Software Partners and Windchill programming experts. Often times, when other reseller/consulting partners get stuck waiting on PTC technical support, Fishbowl has been able to problem solve and keep projects on time and on budget.

If your organization is seeking to find an effective and efficient way to bulk load data from one Windchill system to another, our experts at Fishbowl Solutions are able to accomplish this on time and on budget. Urgency is a priority in these circumstances, and we want to ensure you’re able to make this transition process as hassle-free as possible with no downtime. Not sure which tool is the best fit for your Windchill migration project? Check out our website, click the “Contact Us” tab, or reach out to Rick Passolt in our business development department for more information or to request a demo.

Contact Us

Rick Passolt
Senior Account Executive
952.456.3418
mcadsales@fishbowlsolutions.com

Seth Richter is a Senior Solutions Architect at Fishbowl Solutions. Fishbowl Solutions was founded in 1999. Their areas of expertise include Oracle WebCenter, PTC’s Product Development System (PDS), and enterprise search solutions using the Google Search Appliance. Check out our website to learn more about what we do.

The post Approaches to Consider for Your Organization’s Windchill Consolidation Project appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Consider Your Options for SolidWorks to Windchill Data Migrations

This post comes from Fishbowl Solutions’ Associate MCAD Consultant, Ben Sawyer.

CAD data migrations are most often seen as a huge burden. They can be lengthy, costly, messy, and a general road block to a successful project. Organizations planning on migrating SolidWorks data to PTC Windchill should consider their options when it comes to the process and tools they utilize to perform the bulk loading.

At Fishbowl Solutions, our belief is that the faster you can load all your data accurately into Windchill, the faster your company can implement critical PLM business processes and realize the results of such initiatives like a Faster NPI, Streamline Change & Configuration Management, Improved Quality, Etc.

There are two typical project scenarios we encounter with these kinds of data migration projects. SolidWorks data resides on a Network File System (NFS) or resides in either PDMWorks or EPDM.

The options for this process and the tools used will be dependent on other factors as well. The most common guiding factors to influence decisions are the quantity of data and the project completion date requirements. Here are typical project scenarios.

Scenario One: Files on a Network File System

Manual Migration

There is always an option to manually migrate SolidWorks data into Windchill. However, if an organization has thousands of files from multiple products that need to be imported, this process can be extremely daunting. When loading manually, this process involves bringing files into the Windchill workspace, carefully resolving any missing dependents, errors, duplicates, setting destination folders, revisions, lifecycles and fixing bad metadata. (Those who have tried this approach with large data quantities in the past know the pain of which we are talking about!)

Automated Solution

Years ago, Fishbowl developed its LinkLoader tool for SolidWorks as a viable solution to complete a Windchill bulk loading project with speed and accuracy.

Fishbowl’s LinkLoader solution follows a simple workflow to help identify data to be cleansed and mass loaded with accurate metadata. The steps are as follows:

1. Discovery
In this initial stage, the user chooses the mass of SolidWorks data to be loaded into Windchill. Since Windchill doesn’t allow duplicate named CAD files in the system, the software quickly identifies these duplicate files. It is up to the user to resolve the duplicate files or remove them from the data loading set.

2. Validation
The validation stage will ensure files are retrievable, attributes/parameters are extracted (for use in later stages), and relationships with other SolidWorks files are examined. LinkLoader captures all actions. The end user will need to resolve any errors or remove the data from the loading set.

3. Mapping
Moving toward the bulk loading stage, it is necessary to confirm and/or modify the attribute-mapping file as desired. The only required fields for mapping are lifecycle, revision/version, and the Windchill folder location. End users are able to leverage the attributes/parameter information from the validation as desired, or create their own ‘Instance Based Attribute’ list to map with the files.

4. Bulk Load
Once the mapping stage is completed, the loading process is ready. There is a progress indicator that displays the number of files completed and the percentage done. If there are errors with any files during the upload, it will document these in an ‘Error List Report’ and LinkLoader will simply move on to the next file.

Scenario Two: Files reside in PDMWorks or EPDM

Manual Migration

There is also an option to do a manual data migration from one system to another if files reside in PDMWorks or EPDM. However, this process can also be tedious and drawn out as much, or perhaps even more than when the files are on a NFS.

Automated Solution

Having files within PDMWorks or EPDM can make the migration process more straightforward and faster than the NFS projects. Fishbowl has created an automated solution tool that extracts the latest versions of each file from the legacy system and immediately prepares it for loading into Windchill. The steps are as follows:

1. Extraction (LinkExtract)
In this initial stage, Fishbowl uses its LinkExtract tool to pull the latest version of all SolidWorks files , determine references, and extract all the attributes for the files as defined in PDMWorks or EPDM.

2. Mapping
Before loading the files, it is necessary to confirm and or modify the attribute mapping file as desired. Admins can fully leverage the attributes/parameter information from the Extraction step, or can start from scratch if they find it to be easier. Often the destination Windchill system will have different terminology or states and it is easy to remap those as needed in this step.

3. Bulk Load
Once the mapping stage is completed, the loading process is ready. There is a progress indicator that displays the number of files completed and the percentage done. If there are errors with any files during the upload, it will document these in the Error List Report and LinkLoader will move on to the next file.

Proven Successes with LinkLoader

Many of Fishbowl’s customers have purchased and successfully ran LinkLoader themselves with little to no assistance from Fishbowl. Other customers of ours have utilized our consulting services to complete the migration project on their behalf.

With Fishbowl’s methodology centered on “Customer First”, our focus and support continuously keeps our customers satisfied. This is the same commitment and expertise we will bring to any and every data migration project.

If your organization is looking to consolidate SolidWorks CAD data to Windchill in a timely and effective manner, regardless of the size and scale of the project, our experts at Fishbowl Solutions can get it done.

For example, Fishbowl partnered with a multi-billion dollar medical device company with a short time frame to migrate over 30,000 SolidWorks files from a legacy system into Windchill. Fishbowl’s expert team took initiative and planned the process to meet their tight industry regulations and finish on time and on budget. After the Fishbowl team executed test migrations, the actual production migration process only took a few hours, thus eliminating engineering downtime.

If your organization is seeking the right team and tools to complete a SolidWorks data migration to Windchill, reach out to us at Fishbowl Solutions.

If you’d like more information about Fishbowl’s LinkLoader tool or our other products and services for PTC Windchill and Creo, check out our website, click the “Contact Us” tab, or reach out to Rick Passolt in our business development department.

Contact Us

Rick Passolt
Senior Account Executive
952.465.3418
mcadsales@fishbowlsolutions.com

Ben Sawyer is an Associate MCAD Consultant at Fishbowl Solutions. Fishbowl Solutions was founded in 1999. Their areas of expertise include Oracle WebCenter, PTC’s Product Development System (PDS), and enterprise search solutions using the Google Search Appliance. Check out our website to learn more about what we do. 

The post Consider Your Options for SolidWorks to Windchill Data Migrations appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

What I Have Learned as an Oracle WebCenter Consultant in My First Three Months at Fishbowl Solutions

This post comes from Fishbowl Solutions’ Associate Software Consultant, Jake Jehlicka.

Finishing college can be an intimidating experience for many. We leave what we know behind to open the gates to brand new experiences. Those of us fortunate enough to gain immediate employment often find ourselves leaving school and plunging headfirst into an entirely new culture a mere few weeks after turning in our last exam. It is exciting, yet frightening, and what can make-or-break the whole experience is the new environment in which you find yourself if. I consider myself one of the lucky ones.

Intern shirt-back

I have been with Fishbowl Solutions for just over three months, and the experience is unlike any that I had encountered in my previous internships, work, or schooling in Duluth. I moved to the Twin Cities within a week of accepting the position. I was terrified, but my fears were very soon laid to rest. Fishbowl welcomed me with open arms, and I have learned an incredible amount in the short time that I have spent here. Here are just a few of the many aspects of Fishbowl and the skills I’ve gained since working here as an associate software consultant.

Culture

One of the things that really jumped out at me right away is how a company’s culture is a critical component to making work enjoyable and sustainable. Right from the outset, I was invited and even encouraged to take part in Fishbowl’s company activities like their summer softball team and happy hours celebrating new employees joining the team. I have seen first-hand how much these activities bring the workplace together in a way that not only makes employees happy, but makes them very approachable when it comes to questions or assistance. The culture here seems to bring everyone together in a way that is unique to Fishbowl, and the work itself sees benefits because of it.

Teamwork

Over the past three months, one thing that I have also learned is the importance of working together. I joined Fishbowl a few weeks after the other trainees in my group, and they were a bit ahead of me in the training program when I started. Not only were they ready and willing to answer any questions that I had, but they also shared their knowledge that they had acquired in such a way that I was able to catch up before our training had completed. Of course the other trainees weren’t the only ones willing to lend their assistance. The team leads have always been there whenever I needed a technical question answered, or even if I just wanted advice in regard to where my own career may be heading.

People Skills

The team leads also taught me that not every skill is something that can be measured. Through my training, we were exposed to other elements outside of the expected technical skills. We were given guidance when it comes to oft-neglected soft skills such as public speaking and client interactions. These sorts of skills are utterly necessary to learn, regardless of which industry you are in. It is thanks to these that I have already had positive experiences working with our clients.

Technical Skills

As a new software consultant at Fishbowl, I have gained a plethora of knowledge about various technologies and applications, especially with Oracle technologies. The training that I received has prepared me for working with technologies like Oracle WebCenter in such a way that I have been able to dive right into projects as soon as I finished. Working with actual systems was nearly a foreign concept after working with small individual projects in college, but I learned enough from my team members to be able to proceed with confidence. The training program at Fishbowl has a very well-defined structure, with an agenda laid out of what I should be working on in any given time period. A large portion of this was working directly with my own installation of the WebCenter content server. I was responsible for setting up, configuring, and creating a custom code for the servers both in a Windows and Linux environment. The training program was very well documented and I always had the tools, information, and assistance that was needed to complete every task.

Once the formal training ended, I was immediately assigned a customer project involving web development using Oracle’s Site Studio Designer. The training had actually covered this application and I was sufficiently prepared to tackle the new endeavor! With that said, every single day at Fishbowl is another day of education; no two projects are identical and there is always something to be learned. For example, I am currently learning Ext JS with Sencha Architect in preparation for a new project!

Although we may never know with absolute certainty what the future has in store for us, I can confidently say that the experiences, skills, knowledge that I have gained while working at Fishbowl Solutions will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Thank you to the entire Fishbowl team for everything they have done for me, and I look forward to growing alongside them!

j_jehlicka

Jake Jehlicka is an Associate Software Consultant at Fishbowl Solutions. Fishbowl Solutions was founded in 1999. Their areas of expertise include Oracle WebCenter, PTC’s Product Development System (PDS), and enterprise search solutions using the Google Search Appliance. Check out our website to learn more about what we do. 

The post What I Have Learned as an Oracle WebCenter Consultant in My First Three Months at Fishbowl Solutions appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Why taking good holidays is good practice

Steve Jones - Wed, 2016-08-24 02:22
Back when I was a fairly recent graduate I received one of the best pieces of advice I've ever received.  The project was having some delivery pressures and I was seen as crucial to one of the key parts.  As a result my manager was putting pressure on me to cancel my holiday (two weeks of Windsurfing bliss in the Med with friends) with a promise that the company would cover the costs.  I was
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Variable substitution for a manifest.yml for Cloud Foundry

Pas Apicella - Fri, 2016-08-19 06:45
Pushed applications to CF or PCF you would of most likely used a manifest.yml file and at some point wanted to use variable substitution. manifest.yml files don't support that and a feature request has been asked for this as follows

https://github.com/cloudfoundry/cli/issues/820

With a recent customer we scripted the creation of a manifest.yml file from a Jenkins job  which would inject the required ROUTE to the application by creating the manifest.yml through a script as follows as shown below.

manifest-demo.sh

export ROUTE=$1

echo ""
echo "Setting route to $ROUTE ..."
echo ""

cat > manifest.yml <<!
---
applications:
- name: gs-rest-service
  memory: 256M
  instances: 1
  host: $ROUTE
  path: target/gs-rest-service-0.1.0.jar
!

cat manifest.yml

Script tested as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/bin/manifest-demo$ ./manifest-demo.sh apples-route-pas

Setting route to apples-route-pas ...

---
applications:
- name: gs-rest-service
  memory: 256M
  instances: 1
  host: apples-route-pas
  path: target/gs-rest-service-0.1.0.jar

Categories: Fusion Middleware

HttpSessionListener with Spring Boot Application

Pas Apicella - Tue, 2016-08-16 07:55
I had a requirement to implement a HttpSessionListener in my Spring Boot application which has no web.xml. To achieve this I did the following

1. My HttpSessionListener was defined as follows
 
package com.pivotal.pcf.mysqlweb.utils;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpSessionEvent;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpSessionListener;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;

public class SessionListener implements HttpSessionListener
{
protected static Logger logger = Logger.getLogger("controller");
private HttpSession session = null;

public void sessionCreated(HttpSessionEvent event)
{
// no need to do anything here as connection may not have been established yet
session = event.getSession();
logger.info("Session created for id " + session.getId());
}

public void sessionDestroyed(HttpSessionEvent event)
{
session = event.getSession();
/*
* Need to ensure Connection is closed from ConnectionManager
*/

ConnectionManager cm = null;

try
{
cm = ConnectionManager.getInstance();
cm.removeConnection(session.getId());
logger.info("Session destroyed for id " + session.getId());
}
catch (Exception e)
{
logger.info("SesssionListener.sessionDestroyed Unable to obtain Connection", e);
}
}
}
2. Register the listener from a @Configration class as shown below<br />
  
package com.pivotal.pcf.mysqlweb;

import com.pivotal.pcf.mysqlweb.utils.SessionListener;
import org.springframework.boot.context.embedded.ServletListenerRegistrationBean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Configuration;

import javax.servlet.http.HttpSessionListener;

@Configuration
public class ApplicationSessionConfiguration
{
@Bean
public ServletListenerRegistrationBean<HttpSessionListener> sessionListener()
{
return new ServletListenerRegistrationBean<HttpSessionListener>(new SessionListener());
}
}
Thats all you have to do to achieve this


Categories: Fusion Middleware

Simple Spring Boot Application Deployed through Concourse UI to Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Pas Apicella - Thu, 2016-08-11 20:21
The demo below is a full working example of using Spring Boot Application which will build/deploy to Pivotal Cloud Foundry using Concourse. Concourse pipelines can easily be created within your source code as this demo shows and hence created / executed quite easily. Concourse limits itself to three core concepts: tasks, resources, and the jobs that compose them.

https://github.com/papicella/SpringBootSimpleRest

Detailed instructions on how to setup/run this demo using Concourse see the link referenced above which is as follows

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/15829935/platform-demos/concourse-demo/index.html



It's worth reading the details on this link around Concourse Concepts

https://concourse.ci/concepts.html

More Information

https://concourse.ci/
Categories: Fusion Middleware

The ten commandments of IT projects

Steve Jones - Mon, 2016-08-01 13:42
And lo a new project did start and there was much wailing and gnashing of teeth, for up on the board had been nailed ten commandments that the project must follow and the developers were sore afraid. Thou shalt put everything in version control, yeah even the meeting minutes, presentations and "requirements documents that aren't even finished yet" for without control everything is chaos Thou
Categories: Fusion Middleware

PCFDev application accessing an Oracle 11g RDBMS

Pas Apicella - Sat, 2016-07-30 21:04
PCF Dev is a small footprint distribution of Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) intended to be run locally on a developer machine. It delivers the essential elements of the Pivotal Cloud Foundry experience quickly through a condensed set of components. PCF Dev is ideally suited to developers wanting to explore or evaluate PCF, or those already actively building cloud native applications to be run on PCF. Working with PCF Dev, developers can experience the power of PCF - from the accelerated development cycles enabled by consistent, structured builds to the operational excellence unlocked through integrated logging, metrics and health monitoring and management.

In this example we show how you can use PCFDev to access an Oracle RDBMS from a PCFDev deployed Spring Boot Application. The application is using the classic Oracle EMP database table found in the SCOTT schema

Source Code as follows


In order to use the steps below you have to have installed PCFDev on your laptop or desktop as per the link below.

Download from here:

Instructions to setup as follows:

Steps

1. Clone as shown below

$ git clone https://github.com/papicella/PCFOracleDemo.git

2. Edit "./PCFOracleDemo/src/main/resources/application.properties" and add your oracle EMP schema connection details

error.whitelabel.enabled=false

oracle.username=scott
oracle.password=tiger
oracle.url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@//192.168.20.131:1521/ora11gr2

3. Define a local MAVEN repo for Oracle 11g JDBC driver as per what is in the pom.xml
  
<!--
Installed as follows to allow inclusion into pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc6 -Dversion=11.2.0.3 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=ojdbc6.jar
-DgeneratePom=true
-->
<dependency>
<groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
<artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
<version>11.2.0.3</version>
</dependency>

4. Package as per below

$ cd PCFOracleDemo
$ mvn package

5. Deploy as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo$ cf push
Using manifest file /Users/pasapicella/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo/manifest.yml

Creating app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

Creating route springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io...
OK

Binding springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io to springboot-oracle...
OK

Uploading springboot-oracle...
Uploading app files from: /var/folders/c3/27vscm613fjb6g8f5jmc2x_w0000gp/T/unzipped-app506692756
Uploading 26.3M, 154 files
Done uploading
OK

Starting app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
Downloading binary_buildpack...
Downloading python_buildpack...
Downloading staticfile_buildpack...
Downloading java_buildpack...
Downloading php_buildpack...
Downloading ruby_buildpack...
Downloading go_buildpack...
Downloading nodejs_buildpack...
Downloaded staticfile_buildpack
Downloaded binary_buildpack (8.3K)
Downloaded php_buildpack (262.3M)
Downloaded java_buildpack (241.6M)
Downloaded go_buildpack (450.3M)
Downloaded ruby_buildpack (247.7M)
Downloaded python_buildpack (254.1M)
Downloaded nodejs_buildpack (60.7M)
Creating container
Successfully created container
Downloading app package...
Downloaded app package (23.5M)
Staging...
-----> Java Buildpack Version: v3.6 (offline) | https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#5194155
-----> Downloading Open Jdk JRE 1.8.0_71 from https://download.run.pivotal.io/openjdk/trusty/x86_64/openjdk-1.8.0_71.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Expanding Open Jdk JRE to .java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre (1.2s)
-----> Downloading Open JDK Like Memory Calculator 2.0.1_RELEASE from https://download.run.pivotal.io/memory-calculator/trusty/x86_64/memory-calculator-2.0.1_RELEASE.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Memory Settings: -XX:MetaspaceSize=64M -XX:MaxMetaspaceSize=64M -Xss995K -Xmx382293K -Xms382293K
-----> Downloading Spring Auto Reconfiguration 1.10.0_RELEASE from https://download.run.pivotal.io/auto-reconfiguration/auto-reconfiguration-1.10.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
Exit status 0
Staging complete
Uploading droplet, build artifacts cache...
Uploading build artifacts cache...
Uploading droplet...
Uploaded build artifacts cache (109B)
Uploaded droplet (68.4M)
Uploading complete

1 of 1 instances running

App started


OK

App springboot-oracle was started using this command `CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.1_RELEASE -memorySizes=metaspace:64m.. -memoryWeights=heap:75,metaspace:10,native:10,stack:5 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100% -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) && JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY" && SERVER_PORT=$PORT eval exec $PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java $JAVA_OPTS -cp $PWD/.:$PWD/.java-buildpack/spring_auto_reconfiguration/spring_auto_reconfiguration-1.10.0_RELEASE.jar org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher`

Showing health and status for app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

requested state: started
instances: 1/1
usage: 512M x 1 instances
urls: springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io
last uploaded: Sun Jul 31 01:23:03 UTC 2016
stack: unknown
buildpack: java-buildpack=v3.6-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#5194155 java-main open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_71 open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.1_RELEASE spring-auto-reconfiguration=1.10.0_RELEASE

     state     since                    cpu    memory      disk        details
#0   running   2016-07-31 11:24:26 AM   0.0%   0 of 512M   0 of 512M
pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo$ cf apps
Getting apps in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

name                requested state   instances   memory   disk   urls
springboot-oracle   started           1/1         512M     512M   springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io

6. Access deployed application at the end point "http://springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io" or using the application route you set in the manifest.yml



Categories: Fusion Middleware

PCFDev application accessing an Oracle 11g RDBMS

Pas Apicella - Sat, 2016-07-30 21:04
PCF Dev is a small footprint distribution of Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) intended to be run locally on a developer machine. It delivers the essential elements of the Pivotal Cloud Foundry experience quickly through a condensed set of components. PCF Dev is ideally suited to developers wanting to explore or evaluate PCF, or those already actively building cloud native applications to be run on PCF. Working with PCF Dev, developers can experience the power of PCF - from the accelerated development cycles enabled by consistent, structured builds to the operational excellence unlocked through integrated logging, metrics and health monitoring and management.

In this example we show how you can use PCFDev to access an Oracle RDBMS from a PCFDev deployed Spring Boot Application. The application is using the classic Oracle EMP database table found in the SCOTT schema

Source Code as follows


In order to use the steps below you have to have installed PCFDev on your laptop or desktop as per the link below.

Download from here:

Instructions to setup as follows:

Steps

1. Clone as shown below

$ git clone https://github.com/papicella/PCFOracleDemo.git

2. Edit "./PCFOracleDemo/src/main/resources/application.properties" and add your oracle EMP schema connection details

error.whitelabel.enabled=false

oracle.username=scott
oracle.password=tiger
oracle.url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@//192.168.20.131:1521/ora11gr2

3. Define a local MAVEN repo for Oracle 11g JDBC driver as per what is in the pom.xml

  
<!--
Installed as follows to allow inclusion into pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc6 -Dversion=11.2.0.3 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=ojdbc6.jar
-DgeneratePom=true
-->
<dependency>
<groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
<artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
<version>11.2.0.3</version>
</dependency>


4. Package as per below

$ cd PCFOracleDemo
$ mvn package

5. Deploy as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo$ cf push
Using manifest file /Users/pasapicella/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo/manifest.yml

Creating app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

Creating route springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io...
OK

Binding springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io to springboot-oracle...
OK

Uploading springboot-oracle...
Uploading app files from: /var/folders/c3/27vscm613fjb6g8f5jmc2x_w0000gp/T/unzipped-app506692756
Uploading 26.3M, 154 files
Done uploading
OK

Starting app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
Downloading binary_buildpack...
Downloading python_buildpack...
Downloading staticfile_buildpack...
Downloading java_buildpack...
Downloading php_buildpack...
Downloading ruby_buildpack...
Downloading go_buildpack...
Downloading nodejs_buildpack...
Downloaded staticfile_buildpack
Downloaded binary_buildpack (8.3K)
Downloaded php_buildpack (262.3M)
Downloaded java_buildpack (241.6M)
Downloaded go_buildpack (450.3M)
Downloaded ruby_buildpack (247.7M)
Downloaded python_buildpack (254.1M)
Downloaded nodejs_buildpack (60.7M)
Creating container
Successfully created container
Downloading app package...
Downloaded app package (23.5M)
Staging...
-----> Java Buildpack Version: v3.6 (offline) | https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#5194155
-----> Downloading Open Jdk JRE 1.8.0_71 from https://download.run.pivotal.io/openjdk/trusty/x86_64/openjdk-1.8.0_71.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Expanding Open Jdk JRE to .java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre (1.2s)
-----> Downloading Open JDK Like Memory Calculator 2.0.1_RELEASE from https://download.run.pivotal.io/memory-calculator/trusty/x86_64/memory-calculator-2.0.1_RELEASE.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Memory Settings: -XX:MetaspaceSize=64M -XX:MaxMetaspaceSize=64M -Xss995K -Xmx382293K -Xms382293K
-----> Downloading Spring Auto Reconfiguration 1.10.0_RELEASE from https://download.run.pivotal.io/auto-reconfiguration/auto-reconfiguration-1.10.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
Exit status 0
Staging complete
Uploading droplet, build artifacts cache...
Uploading build artifacts cache...
Uploading droplet...
Uploaded build artifacts cache (109B)
Uploaded droplet (68.4M)
Uploading complete

1 of 1 instances running

App started


OK

App springboot-oracle was started using this command `CALCULATED_MEMORY=$($PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java-buildpack-memory-calculator-2.0.1_RELEASE -memorySizes=metaspace:64m.. -memoryWeights=heap:75,metaspace:10,native:10,stack:5 -memoryInitials=heap:100%,metaspace:100% -totMemory=$MEMORY_LIMIT) && JAVA_OPTS="-Djava.io.tmpdir=$TMPDIR -XX:OnOutOfMemoryError=$PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/killjava.sh $CALCULATED_MEMORY" && SERVER_PORT=$PORT eval exec $PWD/.java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre/bin/java $JAVA_OPTS -cp $PWD/.:$PWD/.java-buildpack/spring_auto_reconfiguration/spring_auto_reconfiguration-1.10.0_RELEASE.jar org.springframework.boot.loader.JarLauncher`

Showing health and status for app springboot-oracle in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

requested state: started
instances: 1/1
usage: 512M x 1 instances
urls: springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io
last uploaded: Sun Jul 31 01:23:03 UTC 2016
stack: unknown
buildpack: java-buildpack=v3.6-offline-https://github.com/cloudfoundry/java-buildpack.git#5194155 java-main open-jdk-like-jre=1.8.0_71 open-jdk-like-memory-calculator=2.0.1_RELEASE spring-auto-reconfiguration=1.10.0_RELEASE

     state     since                    cpu    memory      disk        details
#0   running   2016-07-31 11:24:26 AM   0.0%   0 of 512M   0 of 512M
pasapicella@pas-macbook:~/pivotal/DemoProjects/spring-starter/pivotal/PCFOracleDemo$ cf apps
Getting apps in org pcfdev-org / space pcfdev-space as admin...
OK

name                requested state   instances   memory   disk   urls
springboot-oracle   started           1/1         512M     512M   springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io

6. Access deployed application at the end point "http://springboot-oracle.local.pcfdev.io" or using the application route you set in the manifest.yml



Categories: Fusion Middleware

Fishbowl’s Agile (like) Approach to Oracle WebCenter Portal Projects

In this video blog, Fishbowl Solutions’ Technical Project Manager, Justin Ames, and Marketing Team Lead, Jason Lamon, discuss Fishbowl’s Agile (like) approach to managing Oracle WebCenter portal projects. Justin shares an overview of what Agile and Scrum mean, how it is applied to portal development, and the customer benefits of applying Agile to an overall portal project.

Customer Testimonial:

“This is my first large project being managed with an Agile-like approach, and it has made a believer out of me. The Sprints and Scrum meetings led by the Fishbowl Solutions team enable us to focus on producing working portal features that can be quickly validated. And because it is an iterative build process, we can quickly make changes. This has lead to the desired functionality we are looking for within our new employee portal based on Oracle WebCenter.”

Michael Berry

Staff VP, Compensation and HRIS

Large Health Insurance Provider

The post Fishbowl’s Agile (like) Approach to Oracle WebCenter Portal Projects appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Telstra WIFI API Consumer on Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Pas Apicella - Mon, 2016-07-25 07:23
If you heard of Telstra WIFI API you will know it will allow you to search for WIFI Hotspots within a given radius and can be used after signing in for Telstra.dev account at https://dev.telstra.com/ to obtain the Hotpots within a given Radius and Lat/Long location.

The WIFI API for Telstra is described at the link below.

  https://dev.telstra.com/content/wifi-api

The following application I built on Pivotal Cloud Foundry consumes this Telstra WIFI API service and using the Google Map API along with Spring Boot will show you all the WIFI Hotspots Telstra provides from a mobile device or a Web Browser at your current location. The live URL is as follows. You will need to agree to share your location and enable Location services from your browser when on a mobile device for the MAP to be of any use. Lastly this is only useful within Australia of course.

http://pas-telstrawifi.cfapps.io/



Source Code as follows:

https://github.com/papicella/TelstraWIFIAPIPublic

More Information

https://dev.telstra.com/content/wifi-api
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Billing/Metering on Pivotal Cloud Foundry using the Usage Service API's

Pas Apicella - Wed, 2016-07-13 20:05
Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) provides a REST API to provide billing/metering data for application and service usage. Although this usage can we viewed in the applications manager dashboard UI in this post below we will show how to use the REST based API using PCF 1.7.

Below we will show how to use the cf CLI to retrieve information about your app and service instances via the Cloud Controller and Usage service APIs.

Obtain Usage Information for an Organization

To obtain individual org usage information, use the following procedure. You must log in as an admin or as an Org Manager or Org Auditor for the org you want to view.

1. Target the end point of the cloud controller as follows

papicella@papicella:~/apps/ENV$ cf api https://api.system.yyyy.net --skip-ssl-validation
Setting api endpoint to https://api.system.yyyy.net...
OK

API endpoint:   https://api.system.yyyy.net (API version: 2.54.0)
User:           papicella@pivotal.io
Org:            system
Space:          pas

2. Login as shown below

papicella@papicella:~/apps/ENV$ cf login -u papicella@pivotal.io -o system -s pas
API endpoint: https://api.system.yyyy.net

Password>
Authenticating...
OK

Targeted org system

Targeted space pas

API endpoint:   https://api.system.yyyy.net (API version: 2.54.0)
User:           papicella@pivotal.io
Org:            system
Space:          pas

Now if your using CURL for example you can inject the GUID of your organization as part of the command as well as the "oauth-token". Here is an example on how that is done.

Endpoint format: 

https://app-usage.YOUR-DOMAIN/organizations/{ORG_GUID}/app_usages?start=YYYY-MM-DD&end=YYYY-MM-DD

3. Issue REST call as shown below.

papicella@papicella:~$ curl "https://app-usage.system.yyyy.net/organizations/`cf org system --guid`/app_usages?start=2016-06-01&end=2016-06-30" -k -v -H "authorization: `cf oauth-token`" | python -m json.tool
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0*   Trying 222.237.99.147...
* Connected to app-usage.system.yyyy.net (222.237.99.147) port 443 (#0)
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0* TLS 1.2 connection using TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
* Server certificate: *.system.yyyy.net
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:--  0:00:01 --:--:--     0> GET /organizations/b75c9069-83b4-4130-a98e-a5eb4c5454c5/app_usages?start=2016-06-01&end=2016-06-30 HTTP/1.1
> Host: app-usage.system.yyyy.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.43.0
> Accept: */*
> authorization: bearer AwZi1lYjYGVyIMPPO-06eUG1FM12DY964Eh5AA_6Ga8P7IoB4Qr2OVx_vHh6o35IFKw .....
>
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Cache-Control: max-age=0, private, must-revalidate
< Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
< Etag: "16161b20edbc072ab63f8f8acf6ff251"
< Server: thin
< X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
< X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN
< X-Request-Id: 3ef758d1-3f8d-4942-b0bc-44666c2797e5
< X-Runtime: 0.167997
< X-Vcap-Request-Id: 01794681-8e29-4a07-463c-3660d0c3b349
< X-Xss-Protection: 1; mode=block
< Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 00:41:55 GMT
< Content-Length: 1766
<
{ [1766 bytes data]
100  1766  100  1766    0     0    755      0  0:00:02  0:00:02 --:--:--   755
* Connection #0 to host app-usage.system.yyyy.net left intact
{
    "app_usages": [
        {
            "app_guid": "17eee541-051a-44b5-83ae-bbbba5519af7",
            "app_name": "springboot-telstrasms",
            "duration_in_seconds": 0,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "7a0cfa11-d71d-4dd6-a706-b5eff622fb66",
            "space_name": "pas"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "1f102a77-ce84-4cf4-93d1-e015abdf65b5",
            "app_name": "company",
            "duration_in_seconds": 1622,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "2d05970c-3f94-4329-a92a-5b81f95a9365",
            "app_name": "jay-test",
            "duration_in_seconds": 448,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "2d05970c-3f94-4329-a92a-5b81f95a9365",
            "app_name": "jay-test",
            "duration_in_seconds": 692,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 1024,
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "4b771593-5032-41f9-84ff-1ecfec9a7f4d",
            "app_name": "company",
            "duration_in_seconds": 18430,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "a5435de0-1dd3-49ba-a551-94e921a5999b",
            "app_name": "springboot-telstrasms",
            "duration_in_seconds": 677,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "7a0cfa11-d71d-4dd6-a706-b5eff622fb66",
            "space_name": "pas"
        },
        {
            "app_guid": "f9c7f387-d008-4541-b093-92fb23e01aee",
            "app_name": "company",
            "duration_in_seconds": 0,
            "instance_count": 1,
            "memory_in_mb_per_instance": 512,
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        }
    ],
    "organization_guid": "b75c9069-83b4-4130-a98e-a5eb4c5454c5",
    "period_end": "2016-06-30T23:59:59Z",
    "period_start": "2016-06-01T00:00:00Z"

}

4. To obtain usage information about services you would issue a REST call as follows

Use cf curl to retrieve service instance information. The service_instances? endpoint retrieves details about both bound and unbound service instances:

Endpoint format: 

https://app-usage.YOUR-DOMAIN/organizations{ORG_GUID}/service_usages?start=YYYY-MM-DD&end=YYYY-MM-DD

papicella@papicella:~$ curl "https://app-usage.system.yyyy.net/organizations/b75c9069-83b4-4130-a98e-a5eb4c5454c5/service_usages?start=2016-06-01&end=2016-06-30" -k -v -H "authorization: `cf oauth-token`" | python -m json.tool
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0*   Trying 222.237.99.147...
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0* Connected to app-usage.system.yyyy.net (222.237.99.147) port 443 (#0)
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:--  0:00:02 --:--:--     0* TLS 1.2 connection using TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
* Server certificate: *.system.yyyy.net
> GET /organizations/b75c9069-83b4-4130-a98e-a5eb4c5454c5/service_usages?start=2016-06-01&end=2016-06-30 HTTP/1.1
> Host: app-usage.system.yyyy.net
> User-Agent: curl/7.43.0
> Accept: */*
> authorization: bearer eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiJ9.....
>
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:--  0:00:03 --:--:--     0< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Cache-Control: max-age=0, private, must-revalidate
< Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
< Etag: "909824b589cbed6c3d19c2f36bec985e"
< Server: thin
< X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
< X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN
< X-Request-Id: 2255821e-116c-4651-b483-1939f0f1f866
< X-Runtime: 0.137921
< X-Vcap-Request-Id: 3991c5f9-11c2-4c0e-5f2b-d1f94be87ef4
< X-Xss-Protection: 1; mode=block
< Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 00:53:47 GMT
< Transfer-Encoding: chunked
<
{ [3632 bytes data]
100  3978    0  3978    0     0   1283      0 --:--:--  0:00:03 --:--:--  1283
* Connection #0 to host app-usage.system.yyyy.net left intact
{
    "organization_guid": "b75c9069-83b4-4130-a98e-a5eb4c5454c5",
    "period_end": "2016-06-30T23:59:59Z",
    "period_start": "2016-06-01T00:00:00Z",
    "service_usages": [
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 2592000.0,
            "service_guid": "5c03686a-6748-4b76-bb6f-cbd116d5d87e",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-05-10T01:58:01.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "bd09176c-483c-4011-b329-fba717abfc27",
            "service_instance_name": "spring-cloud-broker-db",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "p-mysql",
            "service_plan_guid": "b3525660-1a74-452f-9564-65a2556895bd",
            "service_plan_name": "100mb-dev",
            "space_guid": "8a9788b2-8405-4312-99fc-6854a2972616",
            "space_name": "p-spring-cloud-services"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 2592000.0,
            "service_guid": "b0a9fb4e-325b-402b-8a99-d53d7f7df80c",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-05-10T01:58:03.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "ad82aa5b-fd7c-4e7d-b56f-523f7b285c5d",
            "service_instance_name": "spring-cloud-broker-rmq",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "p-rabbitmq",
            "service_plan_guid": "0cfd01c4-aea0-4ab0-9817-a312d91eee8d",
            "service_plan_name": "standard",
            "space_guid": "8a9788b2-8405-4312-99fc-6854a2972616",
            "space_name": "p-spring-cloud-services"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 2592000.0,
            "service_guid": "5c03686a-6748-4b76-bb6f-cbd116d5d87e",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-05-11T06:53:19.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "9c306f43-b17d-4a59-964d-828db5047e04",
            "service_instance_name": "mydb",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "p-mysql",
            "service_plan_guid": "b3525660-1a74-452f-9564-65a2556895bd",
            "service_plan_name": "100mb-dev",
            "space_guid": "7938ae22-6a1c-49bc-9cf4-08b9b6281e83",
            "space_name": "autoscaling"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 2592000.0,
            "service_guid": "23a0f05f-fed6-4873-b0f5-77457b721626",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-05-11T06:57:01.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "75a4f233-25a4-4fb2-b205-354716c6c081",
            "service_instance_name": "auto",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "app-autoscaler",
            "service_plan_guid": "5e0285ad-92b5-4cda-95e7-36db4a16fa05",
            "service_plan_name": "bronze",
            "space_guid": "7938ae22-6a1c-49bc-9cf4-08b9b6281e83",
            "space_name": "autoscaling"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 2592000.0,
            "service_guid": "5c03686a-6748-4b76-bb6f-cbd116d5d87e",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-05-20T08:39:09.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "9b69e1d0-2f93-48d2-a0b0-fc009ebbfe1d",
            "service_instance_name": "account-db",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "p-mysql",
            "service_plan_guid": "b3525660-1a74-452f-9564-65a2556895bd",
            "service_plan_name": "100mb-dev",
            "space_guid": "7938ae22-6a1c-49bc-9cf4-08b9b6281e83",
            "space_name": "autoscaling"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 1947572.0,
            "service_guid": "f603ea87-9b24-4114-9bdc-c4e8154b549c",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-06-08T11:00:28.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "3d75b148-ee78-4f91-aa49-a1b2aa511fd1",
            "service_instance_name": "service-registry",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "p-service-registry",
            "service_plan_guid": "ee6a7f19-f4d2-44f8-b8a2-08246c5d9a5d",
            "service_plan_name": "standard",
            "space_guid": "85d952b4-1acb-45fa-bd8b-d440de745a6f",
            "space_name": "development"
        },
        {
            "deleted": false,
            "duration_in_seconds": 67559.0,
            "service_guid": "23da6824-3ee0-4d87-b031-6223e69327ed",
            "service_instance_creation": "2016-06-30T05:14:01.000Z",
            "service_instance_deletion": null,
            "service_instance_guid": "fd8d2f19-6a8c-43ad-81c1-205e6a29d2b8",
            "service_instance_name": "api-connectors-service",
            "service_instance_type": "managed_service_instance",
            "service_name": "apigee-edge",
            "service_plan_guid": "36ae6841-9eb3-42b7-b40b-aa44ee72a14c",
            "service_plan_name": "org",
            "space_guid": "7a0cfa11-d71d-4dd6-a706-b5eff622fb66",
            "space_name": "pas"
        }
    ]
}

The following screen shots show how this is done using a REST client from a browser.





More Information

http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/1-7/opsguide/accounting-report.html
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Oracle JET and RequireJS

What is RequireJS and why is it important?

RequireJS is a JavaScript file and module loader. Oracle JET uses Require to load only the libraries and modules/components that are needed for a particular part of an Oracle JET application.

As the JavaScript world has taken off, web applications have grown large, and monolithic client.js files have become the norm. This type of code “organization” is difficult to maintain, read and test. In addition, more and more libraries, frameworks, plugins, etc. are being included in applications, making the loading of those resources complicated and slow. Truly, it is a waste to load every script file for each page of an application if it is not needed to run that particular page.

Require was born out of the need to reduce this code complexity. As such, it improves the speed and quality of our code. At its heart, RequireJS was designed to encourage and support modular development.

What is modular development?

Modular development separates out code into distinct functional units. This kind of organization is easy to maintain, easy to read (when coming into an existing project, for example), easy to test, and increases code re-usability. RequireJS supports the Asynchronous Module Definition (AMD) API for JavaScript modules. AMD has a particular way of encapsulating a module and embraces asynchronous loading of a module and its dependencies:

Factory Function

In this module, we call define with an array of the dependencies needed. The dependencies are passed into the factory function as arguments. Importantly, the function is only executed once the required dependencies are loaded.

What does Require look like in Oracle JET

In an Oracle JET application, RequireJS is set up in the main.js (aka “bootstrap”) file. First we need to configure the paths to the various scripts/libraries needed for the app. Here is an example of the RequireJS configuration in the main.js file of the Oracle JET QuickStart template. It establishes the names and paths to all of the various libraries necessary to run the application:

RequireJS configuration

 

Next we have the top-level “require” call which “starts”our application. It follows the AMD API method of encapsulating the module with the require, and passing in dependencies as an array of string values, then executing the callback function once the dependencies have loaded.

Top Level Require

Here we are requiring any scripts and modules needed to load the application, and subsequently calling the function that creates the initial view. Any other code which is used in the initial view of the application is also written here (routing, for example). Note, we only pass in the dependencies that we need to load the initial application, saving valuable resources.

Using RequireJS in other modules/viewModels

RequireJS is also used in the other JavaScript files of a JET application to define viewModels. The syntax used, however, is slightly different, and can be confusing. Let’s take a look:

View Model RequireJS Syntax

Here we are passing in an array of dependencies, but we’re using “define”, and not “require.” In short, “define” is used to facilitate module definition, while “require” is used to handle dependency loading. In a module definition, for example, we can utilize “require” WITHIN a module to fetch other dependencies dynamically. “Require” is typically used to load code in the top-level JavaScript file, and “define” is used to define a module, or distinct functional portion of the application.

Oracle JET makes use of RequireJS to support modular development. Require manages the many JavaScript files and module dependencies needed in an Oracle JET application. It simplifies and organizes the development process, and makes reading, writing and testing code much more straightforward.

The post Oracle JET and RequireJS appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Creating a Service within IntelliJ IDEA to be used by the Service Registry for Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Pas Apicella - Mon, 2016-07-11 19:59
In this example I am going to show how to use IntelliJ IDEA 15 to create a service application from the IDE to be consumed by the Service Registry service in Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF). For more information on this service view the docs page below.

http://docs.pivotal.io/spring-cloud-services/service-registry/index.html

Service Registry for Pivotal Cloud Foundry® (PCF) provides your applications with an implementation of the Service Discovery pattern, one of the key tenets of a microservice-based architecture. Trying to hand-configure each client of a service or adopt some form of access convention can be difficult and prove to be brittle in production. Instead, your applications can use the Service Registry to dynamically discover and call registered services

1. Start IntelliJ IDEA and either "Create a New project" or add a "New Module" to an existing project.

2. Ensure you select "Spring Initializer" as shown below


3. Click Next

4. Describe your project or module, I normally use Maven and generate a JAR file



5. Click Next

6. At the minimum here we only need to select "Service Registry (PCF)" as shown below for the dependency. Of course you would select other options dependncies depending on what the service needed such as REST, JPA, H2 or MySQL etc


7. Click Next

8. Name your new model or project


9. Click Finish

10. Click Finish

11. Your service application must include the @EnableDiscoveryClient annotation on a configuration class. To do that we simply add the annotation to our main class as follows


Java Code
  
package pas.au.pivotal.service.hr;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.cloud.client.discovery.EnableDiscoveryClient;

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;

@SpringBootApplication
@EnableDiscoveryClient
public class EmployeeServiceApplication
{
@Autowired
private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

public static void main(String[] args) {
SpringApplication.run(EmployeeServiceApplication.class, args);
}

@PostConstruct
public void init()
{
employeeRepository.save(new Employee("pas"));
employeeRepository.save(new Employee("lucia"));
employeeRepository.save(new Employee("siena"));
employeeRepository.save(new Employee("lucas"));
}
}

12. Set the spring.application.name property in application.yml. It might be an application.properties file BUT rename it to YML as I know that works. below I not only set the application name I also set the registrationMethod to "route" which is the default and then turn off security as it is enabled by default.

spring:
  application:
    name: employee-service

cloud:
  services:
    registrationMethod: route

security:
  basic:
    enabled: false

So that's all we really need to do here. Of course we will need to add code to our service to do what it needs to do BUT all the config required to enable this service to automatically register itself with the "Service Registry" in PCF is done.

13. Before we deploy this to out PCF instance we have to be sure we have a "Service Registry" service created as shown below using the CF CLI mine is already created.


14. Create a manifest.yml file for the service to be deployed, notice how it binds to the service registry "apples-service-registery", this will ensure it automatically gets registered on deployment with the Service Registry service

---
applications:
- name: apples-employee-service
  memory: 512M
  instances: 1
  host: apples-employee-service-${random-word}
  path: ./target/EmployeeService-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.jar
  services:
    - apples-service-registery

15. Push the service application to PCF as shown below


.....


16. Login into your PCF instance App Manager UI, in this demo I am using PWS instance run.pivotal.io and find your "Service Registry" service and click on it as shown below



17. Click on the "Manage" link as shown below


18. Verify your service is registered as shown below


More Information

http://docs.pivotal.io/spring-cloud-services/service-registry/index.html

https://docs.pivotal.io/spring-cloud-services/service-registry/resources.html

http://docs.pivotal.io/spring-cloud-services/service-registry/writing-client-applications.html
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Pivotal Cloud Foundry Spring Boot JPA demo written in Kotlin

Pas Apicella - Sun, 2016-07-03 18:47
I created the following demo for PCF using spring boot / PCF. After showing a colleague he decided he would write a Kotlin version of the same application. It's interesting to see how the Kotlin classes differ to those of Java.

https://github.com/papicella/PivotalSpringBootJPA

The Kotlin version of the same application is here.

https://github.com/papicella/Kotlin-PivotalSpringBootJPA

Kotlin is a functional language developed by the JetBrains guys. Its main benefits are:

  • Conciseness of code
  • Code safety - Null safety by not allowing nulls values unless one specifies variables to be null.
  • Interoptability - 100% Java interop.
  • Ease of use and reduced learning curve
  • Great tooling - As support in Intellij Idea is brilliant




Categories: Fusion Middleware

Integrating Telstra SMS API with the Apigee Edge Service Broker for Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF)

Pas Apicella - Thu, 2016-06-30 07:35
Apigee and Pivotal partnered to provide comprehensive API management capabilities that expedite the scalable delivery of apps on the powerful Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform. Apigee Edge is available for rapid deployment as a partner service in the Pivotal Network

The following link talks about this service in detail

http://apigee.com/about/solutions/pivotal-cloud-foundry-apigee

In this blog post we walk through how we would use this Service on Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.7 to expose Telstra SMS Api.


1. First we have to deploy our application which provides access to the Public SMS Api from Telstra. This is deployed to Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF). The GitHub project is as follows.

https://github.com/papicella/TelstraSMSAPIPublic



2. Once deployed the application provides two REST endpoints that also includes swagger UI

Note: This Telstra API only works for Australian based mobile numbers and you will need a https://dev.telstra.com/ account to invoke the free Telstra SMS Service. The API is explained in detail at this link https://dev.telstra.com/content/sms-api-0






3. Now at this point we will need to add "Apigee Edge Service Broker for PCF" tile to Pivotal Ops Manager. You can download it from the URL below and follow the instructions to install the Tile onto the

  https://network.pivotal.io/products/apigee-edge-for-pcf-service-broker

4. Once installed it will be shown as a tile on Pivotal Ops Manager as per the image below



5. To ensure it's part of our marketplace services we simply log into our PCF instance using the command line as shown below



OR from the Pivotal Apps Manager



6. Use the create-service command to create an instance of the Apigee Edge service broker as shown below

papicella@papicella:~/pivotal/services/apigee$ cf create-service apigee-edge org api-connectors-service -c api-connectors.json
Creating service instance api-connectors-service in org system / space pas as papicella@pivotal.io...
OK

api-connectors.json

{"org":"papicella", "env":"prod", "user":"papicella@pivotal.io", "pass":"yyyyyyy", "host": "apigee.net", "hostpattern": "${apigeeOrganization}-${apigeeEnvironment}.${proxyHost}"}


The JSON specifies the Apigee Edge details needed to route traffic:

  • org -- Organization of the Apigee Edge proxy through which requests should be routed. You'll find this value at the top of the Edge UI while looking at the Dashboard.
  • env -- Environment of the Apigee Edge proxy through which requests should be routed. You'll find this value at the top of the Edge UI while looking at the Dashboard.
  • user -- Username of an Edge user who has access to create proxies. This is the username you use to log into the Edge UI.
  • pass -- Password of an Edge user who has access to create proxies. The password you use to log into the Edge UI.
  • host -- Edge host name to which requests to your API proxies can be sent.
  • hostpattern -- Pattern for generating the API proxy URL. For example, #{apigeeOrganization}-#{apigeeEnvironment}.#{proxyHost} for cloud accounts.
7. Use the bind-route-service command to create an Edge API proxy and bind your Cloud Foundry application to the proxy. This tells the Go router to redirect requests to the Apigee Edge proxy before sending them to the Cloud Foundry application.

papicella@papicella:~/pivotal/services/apigee$ cf bind-route-service pcfdemo.net api-connectors-service --hostname apples-springboot-telstrasms
Binding route apples-springboot-telstrasms.pcfdemo.net to service instance api-connectors-service in org system / space pas as papicella@pivotal.io...
OK

Note: The hostname is the name of your REST based application

8. With the service created it will then exist within the space as per the image below



9. Click on the service as shown below



10. Click on Manage as shown below



11. In the Apigee management console, under APIs > API proxies, locate the name of the proxy you just created as shown below



12. Click the PCF proxy's name to view its overview page.

13. Click the Trace tab, the click the Start Trace Session button.

14. Back at the command line, access the REST based application endpoint for the Telstra SMS Service as shown below.

papicella@papicella:~/pivotal/services/apigee$ curl "http://apples-springboot-telstrasms.pcfdemo.net/telstra/sms?to=0411151350&appkey=apples-key&appsecret=apples-password"
{"messageId":"5188529E91E847589079BAFDBF8B63FF"}

15. Return to the Apigee Management Console to verify Trace Output and a Successful HTTP 200 call. The new proxy is just a pass-through. But it's ready for you or someone on your team to add policies to define security, traffic management, and more.



More Information

Pivotal Cloud Foundry and Apigee - http://apigee.com/about/solutions/pivotal-cloud-foundry-apigee
Pivotal Cloud Foundry - http://pivotal.io/platform

Categories: Fusion Middleware

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