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Some tips on installation Oracle 11gr2 on RHEL6

There are some tips when I finished the installation Oracle 11gr2 on RHEL6.
Full documents exits in Oracle documents library, so you can read them first

1. Install the requirement pacakges

[root@spsdev ~]#yum install local compat-libstdc++-33*
[root@spsdev ~]#yum install local libaio-devel-0.*
[root@spsdev ~]#yum install local pdksh-5.*
[root@spsdev ~]#yum install local unixODBC-devel-2.*
[root@spsdev ~]#yum install local sysstat-7.*

Migration ASM, the ARC diskgroup to the new storage

I'm new on Orafaq, this is my first blog. Thank you Sir John Watson promoted and supported me, and I'm sorry, I usually wrote bad English language.

How indexes can degrade performance

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Indexes may improve the performance of SELECT statements, but what about DML? This simple demo shows how bad they can be.

Roles , PL/SQL, and ORA-00942: table or view does not exist

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Many developers find that their code fails with ORA-942, but when they test the failing statement from the SQL> prompt, it works. Why, and what can you do to fix it?

Natalka Roshak's picture

Recursive WITH, part III: IS_LEAF

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The CONNECT BY syntax provides a useful pseudocolumn, CONNECT_BY_ISLEAF, which identifies leaf nodes in the data: it’s 1 when a row has no further children, 0 otherwise. In this post, I’ll look at emulating this pseudocolumn using recursive WITH.

Natalka Roshak's picture

Recursive WITH, part II: Hierarchical queries

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In my last post, I looked at using recursive WITH to implement simple recursive algorithms in SQL. One very common use of recursion is to traverse hierarchical data. I recently wrote a series of posts on hierarchical data, using Oracle’s CONNECT BY syntax and a fun example. In this post, I’ll be revisiting the same data using recursive WITH.

Natalka Roshak's picture

Recursion with recursive WITH

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I recently had the opportunity to talk with Tom Kyte (!), and in the course of our conversation, he really made me face up to the fact that the SQL syntax I use every day is frozen in time: I’m not making much use of the analytic functions and other syntax that Oracle has introduced since 8i.

Partitioning and Oracle Standard Edition

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I first came across partitioning with release 7, when it didn't exist. Like many DBAs, I simulated it by writing a lot of application code. You can still do this – and you may have to if you haven't bought Enterprise Edition plus the partitioning option. Here's another way to do it, with partitioned views.

Role Playing Dimension in data warehouse

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Dimensions are often recycled for multiple purposes within the same database. For instance, a “Date” dimension can be used for “Date of Sale”, as well as “Date of Delivery”, or “Date of Hire”. This is often referred to as a “role-playing dimension”.

Transporting tablespace from 32 to 64 bit using RMAN

Performing a 32 bit to 64 bit migration using the Transportable Database RMAN feature

This note describes the procedure used to perform a 32 bit to 64 bit conversion of an 11.2.0.3 database on the Linux platform.

The RMAN CONVERT DATABASE command is used to automate the movement of an entire database from one platform (the source platform) to another (the destination platform).

This is provided that the source and destination platforms are of the same endian format.

For example between Linux X86 32 bit and Linux X86 64 bit.

Note the following:

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