Skip navigation.

Feed aggregator

On False Binaries, Walled Gardens, and Moneyball

Michael Feldstein - Sat, 2014-09-20 10:08

D’Arcy Norman started a lively inter-blog conversation like we haven’t seen in the edublogosphere in quite a while with his post on the false binary between LMS and open. His main point is that, even if you think that the open web provides a better learning environment, an LMS provides a better-than-nothing learning environment for faculty who can’t or won’t go through the work of using open web tools, and in some cases may be perfectly adequate for the educational need at hand. The institution has an obligation to provide the least-common-denominator tool set in order to help raise the baseline, and the LMS is it. This provoked a number of responses, but I want to focus on Phil’s two responses, which talk at a conceptual level about building a bridge between the “walled garden” of the LMS and the open web (or, to draw on his analogy, keeping the garden but removing the walls that demarcate its border). There are some interesting implications from this line of reasoning that could be explored. What would be the most likely path for this interoperability to develop? What role would the LMS play when the change is complete? For that matter, what would the whole ecosystem look like?

Seemingly separately from this discussion, we have the new Unizin coalition. Every time that Phil or I write a post on the topic, the most common response we get is, “Uh…yeah, I still don’t get it. Tell me again what the point of Unizin is, please?” The truth is that the Unizin coalition is still holding its cards close to its vest. I suspect there are details of the deals being discussed in back rooms that are crucial to understanding why universities are potentially interested. That said, we do know a couple of broad, high-level ambitions that the Unizin leadership has discussed publicly. One of those is to advance the state of learning analytics. Colorado State University’s VP of Information Technology Pat Burns has frequently talked about “educational Moneyball” in the context of Unizin’s value proposition. And having spoken with a number of stakeholders at Unizin-curious schools, it is fair to say that there is a high level of frustration with the current state of play in commercial learning analytics offerings that is driving some of the interest. But the dots have not been connected for us. What is the most feasible path for advancing the state of learning analytics? And how could Unizin help in this regard?

It turns out that the walled garden questions and the learning analytics questions are related.

The Current State of Interoperability

Right now, our LMS gardens still have walls and very few doors, but they do have windows, thanks to the IMS LTI standard. You can do a few things with LTI, including the following:

  • Send a student from the LMS to someplace elsewhere on the web with single sign-on
  • Bring that “elsewhere” place inside the LMS experience by putting it in an iframe (again, with single sign-on)
  • Send assessment results (if there are any) back from that “elsewhere” to the LMS gradebook.

The first use case for LTI was to bring in a third-party tool (like a web conferencing app or a subject-specific test engine) into the LMS, making it feel like a native tool. The second use case was to send students out to a tool that needed to full control of the screen real estate (like an eBook reader or an immersive learning environment) but to make that process easier for students (through single sign-on) and teachers (through grade return). This is nice, as far as it goes, but it has some significant limitations. From a user experience perspective, it still privileges the LMS as “home base.” As D’Arcy points out, that’s fine for some uses and less fine for others. Further, when you go from the LMS to an LTI tool and back, there’s very little information shared between the tool. For example, you can use LTI to send a student from the LMS to a WordPress multiuser installation, have WordPress register that student and sign that student in, and even provision a new WordPress site for that student. But you can’t have it feed back information on all the student’s posts and comments into a dashboard that combines it with the student’s activity in the LMS and in other LTI tools. Nor can you use LTI to aggregate student posts from their respective WordPress blogs that are related to a specific topic. All of that would have to be coded separately (or, more likely, not done at all). This is less than ideal from both user experience and analytics perspectives.

Enter Uniz…Er…Caliper

There is an IMS standard in development called Caliper that is intended to address this problem (among many others). I have described some of the details of it elsewhere, but for our current purposes the main thing you need to know is that it is based on the same concepts (although not the same technical standards) as the semantic web. What is that? Here’s a high-level explanation from the Man Himself, Mr. Tim Berners-Lee:

Click here to view the embedded video.

The basic idea is that web sites “understand” each other. The LMS would “understand” that a blog provides posts and comments, both of which have authors and tags and categories, and some of which have parent/child relationships with others. Imagine if, during the LTI initial connection, the blog told the LMS about what it is and what it can provide. The LMS could then reply, “Great! I will send you some people who can be ‘authors’, and I will send you some assignments that can be ‘tags.’ Tell me about everything that goes on with my authors and tags.” This would allow instructors to combine blog data with LMS data in their LMS dashboard, start LMS discussion threads off of blog posts, and probably a bunch of other nifty things I haven’t thought of.

But that’s not the only way you could use Caliper. The thing about the semantic web is that it is not hub-and-spoke in design and does not have to have a “center.” It is truly federated. Perhaps the best analogy is to think of your mobile phone. Imagine if students had their own private learning data wallets, the same way that your phone has your contact information, location, and so on. Whenever a learning application—an LMS, a blog, a homework product, whatever—wanted to know something about you, you would get a warning telling you which information the app was asking to access and asking you to approve that access. (Goodbye, FERPA freakouts.) You could then work in those individual apps. You could authorize apps to share information with each other. And you would have your own personal notification center that would aggregate activity alerts from those apps. That notification center could become the primary interface for your learning activities across all the many apps you use. The PLE prototypes that I have seen basically tried to do a basic subset of this capability set using mostly RSS and a lot of duct tape. Caliper would enable a richer, more flexible version of this with a lot less point-to-point hand coding required. You could, for example, use any Caliper-enabled eBook reader that you choose on any device that you choose to do your course-related reading. You could choose to share your annotations with other people in the class and have their annotations appear in your reader. You could share information about what you’ve read and when you’ve read it (or not) with the instructor or with a FitBit-style analytics system that helps recommend better study habits. The LMS could remain primary, fade into the background, or go away entirely, based on the individual needs of the class and the students.

Caliper is being marketed as a learning analytics standard, but because it is based on the concepts underlying the semantic web, it is much more than that.

Can Unizin Help?

One of the claims that Unizin stakeholders make is that the coalition can can accelerate the arrival of useful learning analytics. We have very few specifics to back up this claim so far, but there are occasionally revealing tidbits. For example, University of Wisconsin CIO Bruce Mass wrote, “…IMS Global is already working with some Unizin institutions on new standards.” I assume he is primarily referring to Caliper, since it is the only new learning analytics standard that I know of at the IMS. His characterization is misleading, since it suggests a peer-to-peer relationship between the Unizin institutions and IMS. That is not what is happening. Some Unizin institutions are working in IMS on Caliper, by which I mean that they are participating in the working group. I do not mean to slight or denigrate their contributions. I know some of these folks. They are good smart people, and I have no doubt that they are good contributors. But the IMS is leading the standards development process, and the Unizin institutions are participating side-by-side with other institutions and with vendors in that process.

Can Unizin help accelerate the process? Yes they can, in the same ways that other participants in the working group can. They can contribute representatives to the working groups, and those representatives can suggest use cases. They can review documents. They can write documents. They can implement working prototypes or push their vendors to do so. The latter is probably the biggest thing that anyone can do to move a standard forward. Sitting around a table and thinking about the standard is good and useful, but it’s not a real standard until multiple parties implement it. It’s pretty common for vendors to tell their customers, “Oh yes, of course we will implement Caliper, just as soon as the specification is finalized,” while failing to mention that the specification cannot be finalized until there are implementers. What you end up with is a bunch of kids standing around the pool, each waiting for somebody else to jump in first. In other words, what you end up with is paralysis. If Unizin can accelerate the rate of implementation and testing of the proposed specification by either implementing themselves or pushing their vendor(s) to implement, then they can accelerate the development of real market solutions for learning analytics. And once those solutions exist, then Unizin institutions (along with everyone else) can use them and try to discover how to use all that data to actually improve learning. These are not unique and earth-shaking contributions that only Unizin could make, but they are real and important ones. I hope that they make them.

The post On False Binaries, Walled Gardens, and Moneyball appeared first on e-Literate.

JDeveloper 12c ADF View Token Performance Improvement

Andrejus Baranovski - Sat, 2014-09-20 05:37
There is known limitation in ADF 11g, related to accessing application in the same session from multiple browser tabs. While working with multiple browser tabs, eventually user is going to consume all view tokens, he will get timeout error once he returns back to the previous browser tab. Unused browser tab is producing timeout, because ADF 11g is sharing the same cache of view tokens for all browser tabs in the same session. This means the recent mostly used browser tab is going to consume all view tokens, other browser tab would loose the last token and screen state will be reset. This behaviour is greatly improved in ADF 12c with separate view token cache supported per each browser tab. If your application is designed to allow user access through multiple browser tabs in the same session, you should upgrade to ADF 12c for better performance.

I'm going to post results of a test with 11g and 12c. Firstly I'm going to present ADF 11g case and then ADF 12c.

ADF 11g view token usage:

Sample application contains one regular button, with PartialSubmit=false, to generate new view token on every submit:


Max Tokens parameter in web.xml is set to 2, to simulate token usage:



To see the debug output for view tokens usage on runtime, you should set special parameter - org.apache.myfaces.trinidadinternal.DEBUG_TOKEN_CACHE=true



On runtime try to open two browser tabs. You are going to see two view tokens consumed and reported in the log:



Press Test View Token button in the second tab, this would consume another view token. Remember, we have set maximum two tokens, no in the log it says - removing/adding token. This means, we have consumes both available tokens (for both tabs) and token from the first tab is replaced:



Go back to the first browser tab, try to press the same Test View Token button and you are going to get time out error - view token is lost and you need to reload the tab:


ADF 12c view token usage:

Sample application in the same way as in 11g, also implemented simple button set with PartialSubmit=false. This would force to use new view token on each submit:


Max Tokens parameter in web.xml, again is set to 2:


Two browser tabs are opened and two view tokens are consumed:


Press Test View Token in second browser tab, you are not going to see in the log information about removing/adding token (differently to 11g). This means, view token from the first browser tab still remains in the cache, second browser tab maintains its own view token cache:


Go back to the first browser tab, press Test View Token button - application works fine, no time out error as it was in 11g:


Download sample application ADF 11g and 12c examples - ViewTokensTest.zip.

Focus on Oracle Social Network at OpenWorld

David Haimes - Fri, 2014-09-19 22:49

This is the first of a series of posts I am planning leading up to Oracle OpenWorld which starts in less than a week.  I have a few different focus areas this year, so I’ll write a little about each of them.

I’ve been talking about collaboration in ERP for quite some time and was also very flattered to have TheAppsLab and Ulan for the UX team cover what we have done in their blogs too.  I call it Socializing the Finance Department, it isn’t about more Pot Luck Lunches and after work drinks, it is about using social tools in a secure and efficient manner, embedded in your ERP system, tied to your transactions and business flows to make you more productive.

The Oracle Social Network(OSN) is part of the infrastructure we build our cloud applications on, so it is pervasive in our cloud apps.  There are a lot of good sessions, see here for the complete OSN list.  I will be on a panel discussing the best use cases for social in enterprise applications, Tuesday September 30th 5pm – 5:45pm  - Moscone West – 3022, full details here.

We won’t be doing a demo, but here is one video to give you a taste of what we will discuss, or check out my post Can chatting make us more productive? for another video.  TO be honest, if you catch during the #oow week, I’m usually happy to show this off, so feel free to ask me.


Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 – Bloggers Meetup

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-19 15:35

Oracle OpenWorld Bloggers Meetup Guess what? You all know that it’s coming, when it’s coming and where… That’s right! The Annual Oracle Bloggers Meetup, one of your top favourite events of OpenWorld, is happening at usual place and time.

What: Oracle Bloggers Meetup 2014

When: Wed, 1-Oct-2014, 5:30pm

Where: Main Dining Room, Jillian’s Billiards @ Metreon, 101 Fourth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 (street view). Please comment with “COUNT ME IN” if coming — we need to know the attendance numbers.


Traditionally, Oracle Technology Network and Pythian sponsor the venue and drinks. We will also have some cool things happening and a few prizes.

In the age of Big Data and Internet of Things, our mingling activity this year will be virtual — using an app we wrote specifically for this event, so bring your iStuff and Androids to participate and win. Hope this will work! :)

As usual, vintage t-shirts, ties, or bandanas from previous meetups will make you look cool — feel free to wear them.

For those of you who don’t know the history: The Bloggers Meetup during Oracle OpenWorld was started by Mark Rittman and continued by Eddie Awad, and then I picked up the flag in 2009 (gosh…  6 years already?) The meetups have been a great success for making new friends and catching up with old, so let’s keep them this way! To give you an idea, here are the photos from the OOW08 Bloggers Meetup (courtesy of Eddie Awad) and OOW09 meetup blog post update from myself, and a super cool video by a good blogging friend, Bjorn Roest from OOW13.

While the initial meetings were mostly targeted to Oracle database folks, guys and gals from many Oracle technologies — Oracle database, MySQL, Apps, Sun technologies, Java and more join in the fun. All bloggers are welcome. We estimate to gather around 150 bloggers.

If you are planning to attend, please comment here with the phrase “COUNT ME IN”. This will help us ensure we have the attendance numbers right. Please provide your blog URL with your comment — it’s a Bloggers Meetup after all! Make sure you comment here if you are attending so that we have enough room, food, and (most importantly) drinks.

Of course, do not forget to blog and tweet about this year’s bloggers meetup. See you there!

Categories: DBA Blogs

Best of OTN - Week of September 14th

OTN TechBlog - Fri, 2014-09-19 11:51
Architect Community

The Top 3 most popular videos on the OTN ArchBeat YouTube Channel for the last seven days:

  1. 2 Minute Tech Tip: Vagrant, Puppet, Docker, and Packer
    by Oracle ACE Director Lucas Jellema
  2. 2 Minute Tech Tip: Middleware as a Service
    by Kelly Goestch, Product Director, Oracle Cloud Application Foundation
  3. 2 Minute Tech Tip: Understanding IP Ports
    Oracle ACE Director Simon Haslam

Click here for the entire 2 Minute Tech Tip series.

Friday Fun from OTN Architect Community Director Bob Rhubart:
If the original version of Meghan Trainor's All About That Bass doesn't quite mesh with your musical tastes, mix yourself a nice martini (up, with a lemon twist, please) and cool out with this brilliant, jazzy cover by the marvelous Kate Davis.

Database Community-

w00t! OOW 2014 RAC ATTACK Set Up Instructions- Going to the RAC ATTACK at OOW 2014? We're meeting on Sunday 9/28 starting at 9:00 am at the Oracle Technology Lounge in the Moscone South Lobby. Here's the FIRST, NEXT and FINALLY information you need to be ready to learn more about Oracle 12c and Real Application Clusters.

Java Community-

Java's New Console Management Tool -  Great for sysadmins - Learn More!

Tech Article: Why another MVC? - The recent filing of a new JSR for an MVC 1.0 framework in Java EE 8 [1] calls for some clarification on how that JSR relates to JSF.

Friday Funny from OTN Java Community Manager, Tori Wieldt - What Programmers Say vs. What They Mean

Strategy, Technical and Community Keynotes - Start JavaOne with the Strategy and Technical keynotes to learn about the strategy and roadmaps as well as technical insights. The keynotes will be Sunday, September 28 from 12:45p.m. to 3:00p.m., at Moscone North, Hall D

Systems Community-

Oracle ZS3 Series has the capability to boot directly out of memory 16,000 VMs in under seven minutes. Read more in Steve Zivanic’s interview for the CUBE at VMworld. 

Latest Lab by Orgad: How to Set Up a Hadoop 2 Cluster with Oracle Solaris - How to set up an Apache Hadoop 2 (YARN) cluster using Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris ZFS, and Unified Archive. Presented at Oracle OpenWorld, but I'll try to convince him to publish it on OTN at a later date.

Making Sure Your Exadata Is Running Right -  Rick uses another motorcycle analogy and connects it to Oracle. 

OOW - Focus On Support and Services for Server, Storage and Solaris

Chris Warticki - Fri, 2014-09-19 08:00
Focus On Support and Services for Server, Storage and Solaris   Wednesday, Oct 01, 2014

Conference Sessions

Oracle Solaris: Best Practices for Maintenance and Upgrades
Walter Fisch, Director, Solaris & Network Domain, Oracle
Alfred Mayerhofer, Sr Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
10:15 AM - 11:00 AM Intercontinental - Grand Ballroom A CON8312 Sys Admin Best Practices: Maintaining Oracle Server and Storage Systems
Daniel Green, Sr Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
Jeff Nieusma, Senior Principal Engineer, Oracle
3:30 PM - 4:15 PM Intercontinental - Intercontinental C CON8313 Thursday, Oct 02, 2014

Conference Sessions

System Support: Learn How to Automate Service Requests and Improve Resolution Time
Remco Lengers, Sr. Manager Proactive Support, Oracle
Michael Mcdonnell, X86 & ES Automation Lead, Oracle
10:45 AM - 11:30 AM Marriott Marquis - Salon 1/2/3* CON9132    My Oracle Support Monday Mix

Monday, Sep 29

Join us for a fun and relaxing happy hour at the annual My Oracle Support Monday Mix. This year’s gathering is Monday, September 29 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the ThirstyBear Brewing Company – just a 3 minute walk from Moscone Center. Admission is free for Premier Support customers with your Oracle OpenWorld badge. Visit our web site for more details: http://www.oracle.com/goto/mondaymix 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM ThirstyBear Brewing Company Oracle Support Stars Bar & Mini Briefing Center

Monday, Sep 29

Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and advanced support offerings, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 6:00 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

Tuesday, Sep 30

Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and advanced support offerings, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 6:00 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

Wednesday, Oct 01

Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and advanced support offerings, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 3:45 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

To secure a seat in a session, please use Schedule Builder to add to your Schedule.

Log Buffer #389, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-19 07:23

As the Oracle Open World draws near, bloggers of MySQL and Oracle are getting more excited and productive. SQL Server bloggers are also not far behind. This Blog Edition covers that all.

Oracle:

What’s New With Fast Data at Oracle Open World 2014?

JASPIC improvements in WebLogic 12.1.3 Arjan Tijms.

Larry Ellison Stepping Down as Chief of Oracle.

Mobilizing E-Business Suite with Oracle MAF and FMW at OOW 14.

Oracle ISV Engineering @ Oracle OpenWorld 2014.

SQL Server:

How to create Data Mining Reports using Reporting Services.

Azure Virtual Machines Part 0: A VM Primer.

Stairway to PowerPivot and DAX – Level 7: Function / Iterator Function Pairs: The DAX AVERAGE() and AVERAGEX() Functions.

Free eBook: SQL Server Transaction Log Management.

The Mindset of the Enterprise DBA: Harnessing the Power of Automation.

MySQL:

MySQL 5.6.20 on POWER.

Announcing TokuDB v7.5: Read Free Replication.

Global Transaction ID (GTID) is one of the most compelling new features of MySQL 5.6.

Managing big data? Say ‘hello’ to HP Vertica.

Tweaking MySQL Galera Cluster to handle large databases – open_files_limit.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Shrink Tablespace

Jonathan Lewis - Fri, 2014-09-19 05:10

A recent question on the OTN database forum raised the topic of returning free space in a tablespace to the operating system by rebuilding objects to fill the gaps near the start of files and leave the empty space at the ends of files so that the files could be resized downwards.

This isn’t a process that you’re likely to need frequently, but I have written a couple of notes about it, including a sample query to produce a map of the free and used space in a tablespace. While reading the thread, though, it crossed my mind that recent versions of Oracle introduced a feature that can reduce the amount of work needed to get the job done, so I thought I’d demonstrate the point here.

When you move a table its indexes become unusable and have to be rebuilt; but when an index becomes unusable, the more recent versions of Oracle will drop the segment. Here’s a key point – if the index becomes unusable because the table has been moved the segment is dropped only AFTER the move has completed. Pause a minute for thought and you realise that the smart thing to do before you move a table is to make its indexes unusable so that they release their space BEFORE you move the table. (This strategy is only relevant if you’ve mixed tables and indexes in the same tablespace and if you’re planning to do all your rebuilds into the same tablespace rather than moving everything into a new tablespace.)

Here are some outputs demonstrating the effect in a 12.1.0.2 database. I have created (and loaded) two tables in a tablespace of 1MB uniform extents, 8KB block size; then I’ve created indexes on the two tables. Running my ts_hwm.sql script I get the following results for that tablespace:


FILE_ID    BLOCK_ID   END_BLOCK OWNER      SEGMENT_NAME    SEGMENT_TYPE
------- ----------- ----------- ---------- --------------- ------------------
      5         128         255 TEST_USER  T1              TABLE
                256         383 TEST_USER  T2              TABLE
                384         511 TEST_USER  T1_I1           INDEX
                512         639 TEST_USER  T2_I1           INDEX
                640      65,535 free       free

Notice that it was a nice new tablespace, so I can see the two tables followed by the two indexes at the start of the tablespaces. If I now move table t1 and re-run the script this is what happens:


alter table t1 move;

FILE_ID    BLOCK_ID   END_BLOCK OWNER      SEGMENT_NAME    SEGMENT_TYPE
------- ----------- ----------- ---------- --------------- ------------------
      5         128         255 free       free
                256         383 TEST_USER  T2              TABLE
                384         511 free       free
                512         639 TEST_USER  T2_I1           INDEX
                640         767 TEST_USER  T1              TABLE
                768      65,535 free       free

Table t1 is now situated past the previous tablespace highwater mark and I have two gaps in the tablespace where t1 and the index t1_i1 used to be.

Repeat the experiment from scratch (drop the tables, purge, etc. to empty the tablespace) but this time mark the index unusable before moving the table and this is what happens:


FILE_ID    BLOCK_ID   END_BLOCK OWNER      SEGMENT_NAME    SEGMENT_TYPE
------- ----------- ----------- ---------- --------------- ------------------
      5         128         255 free       free
                256         383 TEST_USER  T2              TABLE
                384         511 TEST_USER  T1              TABLE
                512         639 TEST_USER  T2_I1           INDEX
                640      65,535 free       free

Table t1 has moved into the space vacated by index t1_i1, so the tablespace highwater mark has not moved up.

If you do feel the need to reclaim space from a tablespace by rebuilding objects, you can find that it’s quite hard to decide the order in which the objects should be moved/rebuilt to minimise the work you (or rather, Oracle) has to do; if you remember that any table you move will release its index space anyway and insert a step to mark those indexes unusable before you move the table you may find it’s much easier to work out a good order for moving the tables.

Footnote: I appreciate that some readers may already take advantage of the necessity of rebuilding indexes by dropping indexes before moving tables – but I think it’s a nice feature that we can now make them unusable and get the same benefit without introducing a risk of error when using a script to recreate an index we’ve dropped.

 


Switch CentOS to Oracle Linux - centos2ol.sh

Surachart Opun - Fri, 2014-09-19 04:15
My time has used much with Linux. Some people asked to move from CentOS to Oracle Linux somehow. I used to believe it easy to do like that. Anyway, It'd better to test. I focused on 2 links.
https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos/
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37670_01/E37355/html/ol_switch_yum.html

Oracle introduces centos2ol.sh script that can convert CentOS 5 and 6 systems to Oracle Linux. After that run "yum upgrade" again.
[root@test-centos ~]# uname -r
2.6.32-431.29.2.el6.x86_64
[root@test-centos ~]# cat /etc/centos-release
CentOS release 6.5 (Final)
[root@test-centos ~]# curl -O https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos2ol.sh
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
100  6523  100  6523    0     0   3453      0  0:00:01  0:00:01 --:--:-- 17534
[root@test-centos ~]# sh centos2ol.sh
Checking for required packages...
Checking your distribution...
Looking for yumdownloader...
Finding your repository directory...
Downloading Oracle Linux yum repository file...
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
100  4233  100  4233    0     0   3507      0  0:00:01  0:00:01 --:--:--  4724
Removing unsupported packages...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
Setting up Remove Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package libreport-plugin-rhtsupport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport for package: abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package abrt-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-compat.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-compat = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
---> Package libreport-python.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Running transaction check
---> Package libreport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_dbus.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_web.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_web.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport >= 2.0.9-16 for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package abrt.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-ccpp.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-python.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-libs.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-tui.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-logger.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-mailx.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-reportuploader.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                   | 1.2 kB     00:00
ol6_UEK_latest/primary                                                                                                                           |  16 MB     00:08
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                       | 1.4 kB     00:00
ol6_latest/primary                                                                                                                               |  41 MB     00:21
Dependencies Resolved
========================================================================================================================================================================
 Package                                        Arch                  Version                             Repository                                               Size
========================================================================================================================================================================
Removing:
 libreport-plugin-rhtsupport                    x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 74 k
Removing for dependencies:
 abrt                                           x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                706 k
 abrt-addon-ccpp                                x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                189 k
 abrt-addon-kerneloops                          x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 25 k
 abrt-addon-python                              x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 20 k
 abrt-cli                                       x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                0.0
 abrt-libs                                      x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 24 k
 abrt-tui                                       x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 15 k
 libreport                                      x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                1.2 M
 libreport-cli                                  x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 26 k
 libreport-compat                               x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                7.4 k
 libreport-plugin-kerneloops                    x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 18 k
 libreport-plugin-logger                        x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 23 k
 libreport-plugin-mailx                         x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 32 k
 libreport-plugin-reportuploader                x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 32 k
 libreport-python                               x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 72 k
Transaction Summary
========================================================================================================================================================================
Remove       16 Package(s)
Installed size: 2.4 M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
  Erasing    : abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 1/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                    2/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                          3/16
  Erasing    : abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 4/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        5/16
  Erasing    : abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                     6/16
  Erasing    : abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                7/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              8/16
  Erasing    : libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                            9/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                 10/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                  11/16
  Erasing    : libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        12/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                         13/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-rhtsupport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                             14/16
  Erasing    : libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        15/16
  Erasing    : libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                               16/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                   1/16
  Verifying  : libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                2/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                  3/16
  Verifying  : abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 4/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              5/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-rhtsupport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              6/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                    7/16
  Verifying  : libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                         8/16
  Verifying  : abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                     9/16
  Verifying  : abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                               10/16
  Verifying  : libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        11/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                       12/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                         13/16
  Verifying  : abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                14/16
  Verifying  : libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                           15/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                         16/16
Removed:
  libreport-plugin-rhtsupport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
Dependency Removed:
  abrt.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                   abrt-addon-ccpp.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 abrt-addon-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos
  abrt-addon-python.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos      abrt-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                        abrt-libs.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos
  abrt-tui.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos               libreport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos                       libreport-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
  libreport-compat.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos       libreport-plugin-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos     libreport-plugin-logger.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
  libreport-plugin-mailx.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos libreport-plugin-reportuploader.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos libreport-python.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
Complete!
Backing up and removing old repository files...
Downloading Oracle Linux release package...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Determining fastest mirrors
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                                  351/351
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                                  26103/26103
oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                     |  22 kB     00:00
redhat-release-server-6Server-6.5.0.1.0.1.el6.x86_64.rpm                                                                                         | 2.6 kB     00:00
Switching old release package with Oracle Linux...
warning: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64.rpm: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID ec551f03: NOKEY
Installing base packages for Oracle Linux...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
Determining fastest mirrors
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                   | 1.2 kB     00:00
ol6_UEK_latest/primary                                                                                                                           |  16 MB     00:09
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                                  351/351
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                       | 1.4 kB     00:00
ol6_latest/primary                                                                                                                               |  41 MB     00:21
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                                  26103/26103
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.el6 will be updated
---> Package basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.0.1.el6 will be an update
---> Package grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.el6_5 will be updated
---> Package grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5 will be an update
---> Package grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.el6 will be updated
---> Package grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.0.4.el6 will be an update
---> Package initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4 will be updated
---> Package initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4 will be an update
---> Package oracle-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-1.0.1.el6 will be obsoleting
---> Package oraclelinux-release-notes.x86_64 0:6Server-11 will be installed
---> Package plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1 will be updated
---> Package plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 will be an update
--> Processing Dependency: plymouth-core-libs = 0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 for package: plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64
---> Package redhat-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-12.el6.centos will be obsoleted
--> Running transaction check
---> Package plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1 will be updated
---> Package plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 will be an update
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
Dependencies Resolved
========================================================================================================================================================================
 Package                                          Arch                          Version                                         Repository                         Size
========================================================================================================================================================================
Installing:
 oracle-logos                                     noarch                        60.0.14-1.0.1.el6                               ol6_latest                         12 M
     replacing  redhat-logos.noarch 60.0.14-12.el6.centos
 oraclelinux-release-notes                        x86_64                        6Server-11                                      ol6_latest                         77 k
Updating:
 basesystem                                       noarch                        10.0-4.0.1.el6                                  ol6_latest                        4.3 k
 grub                                             x86_64                        1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5                             ol6_latest                        932 k
 grubby                                           x86_64                        7.0.15-5.0.4.el6                                ol6_latest                         43 k
 initscripts                                      x86_64                        9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4                           ol6_latest                        940 k
 plymouth                                         x86_64                        0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1                            ol6_latest                         89 k
Updating for dependencies:
 plymouth-core-libs                               x86_64                        0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1                            ol6_latest                         88 k
Transaction Summary
========================================================================================================================================================================
Install       2 Package(s)
Upgrade       6 Package(s)
Total download size: 14 M
Downloading Packages:
(1/8): basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm                                                                                                      | 4.3 kB     00:00
(2/8): grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                         | 932 kB     00:00
(3/8): grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                        |  43 kB     00:00
(4/8): initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64.rpm                                                                                              | 940 kB     00:00
(5/8): oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm                                                                                                 |  12 MB     00:06
(6/8): oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64.rpm                                                                                           |  77 kB     00:00
(7/8): plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                  |  89 kB     00:00
(8/8): plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64.rpm                                                                                        |  88 kB     00:00
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total                                                                                                                                   1.5 MB/s |  14 MB     00:09
warning: rpmts_HdrFromFdno: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID ec551f03: NOKEY
Retrieving key from file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-oracle
Importing GPG key 0xEC551F03:
 Userid : Oracle OSS group (Open Source Software group) <build@oss.oracle.com>
 Package: 6:oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64 (installed)
 From   : /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-oracle
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Warning: RPMDB altered outside of yum.
  Installing : oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                               1/15
  Updating   : initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64                                                                                                            2/15
  Updating   : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                      3/15
  Updating   : plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                                4/15
  Updating   : 1:grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                     5/15
  Updating   : basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                                    6/15
  Installing : oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64                                                                                                         7/15
  Updating   : grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                      8/15
  Cleanup    : 1:grub-0.97-84.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                         9/15
  Cleanup    : plymouth-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                              10/15
  Erasing    : redhat-logos-60.0.14-12.el6.centos.noarch                                                                                                          11/15
  Cleanup    : basesystem-10.0-4.el6.noarch                                                                                                                       12/15
  Cleanup    : initscripts-9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4.x86_64                                                                                                          13/15
  Cleanup    : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                    14/15
  Cleanup    : grubby-7.0.15-5.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                         15/15
  Verifying  : grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                      1/15
  Verifying  : 1:grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                     2/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                                3/15
  Verifying  : initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64                                                                                                            4/15
  Verifying  : oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                               5/15
  Verifying  : oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64                                                                                                         6/15
  Verifying  : basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                                    7/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                      8/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                               9/15
  Verifying  : initscripts-9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4.x86_64                                                                                                          10/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                    11/15
  Verifying  : grubby-7.0.15-5.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                         12/15
  Verifying  : redhat-logos-60.0.14-12.el6.centos.noarch                                                                                                          13/15
  Verifying  : 1:grub-0.97-84.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                        14/15
  Verifying  : basesystem-10.0-4.el6.noarch                                                                                                                       15/15
Installed:
  oracle-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-1.0.1.el6                                         oraclelinux-release-notes.x86_64 0:6Server-11
Updated:
  basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.0.1.el6          grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5      grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.0.4.el6      initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4
  plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1
Dependency Updated:
  plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1
Replaced:
  redhat-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-12.el6.centos
Complete!
Updating initrd...
Installation successful!
Run 'yum upgrade' to synchronize your installed packages
with the Oracle Linux repository.
[root@test-centos ~]# yum upgrade
.
.
.
Installed:
  kernel-uek-headers.x86_64 0:2.6.32-400.36.8.el6uek
Updated:
  autofs.x86_64 1:5.0.5-89.0.1.el6_5.2                     bfa-firmware.noarch 0:3.2.23.0-1.0.1.el6          certmonger.x86_64 0:0.61-3.0.1.el6
  coreutils.x86_64 0:8.4-31.0.1.el6_5.2                    coreutils-libs.x86_64 0:8.4-31.0.1.el6_5.2        cpuspeed.x86_64 1:1.5-20.0.1.el6_4
  crash.x86_64 0:6.1.0-5.0.1.el6                           dbus.x86_64 1:1.2.24-7.0.1.el6_3                  dbus-glib.x86_64 0:0.86-6.el6_4
  dbus-libs.x86_64 1:1.2.24-7.0.1.el6_3                    dhclient.x86_64 12:4.1.1-38.P1.0.1.el6            dhcp-common.x86_64 12:4.1.1-38.P1.0.1.el6
  dracut.noarch 0:004-336.0.1.el6_5.2                      dracut-kernel.noarch 0:004-336.0.1.el6_5.2        e2fsprogs.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6
  e2fsprogs-libs.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6                 gstreamer.x86_64 0:0.10.29-1.0.1.el6              gstreamer-tools.x86_64 0:0.10.29-1.0.1.el6
  iptables.x86_64 0:1.4.7-11.0.1.el6                       iptables-ipv6.x86_64 0:1.4.7-11.0.1.el6           irqbalance.x86_64 2:1.0.4-9.0.1.el6_5
  java-1.7.0-openjdk.x86_64 1:1.7.0.65-2.5.1.2.0.1.el6_5   kexec-tools.x86_64 0:2.0.3-3.0.10.el6             kpartx.x86_64 0:0.4.9-72.0.1.el6_5.3
  libcom_err.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6                     libgudev1.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6               libss.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6
  libudev.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6                        libxml2.x86_64 0:2.7.6-14.0.1.el6_5.2             libxml2-python.x86_64 0:2.7.6-14.0.1.el6_5.2
  libxslt.x86_64 0:1.1.26-2.0.2.el6_3.1                    module-init-tools.x86_64 0:3.9-21.0.1.el6_4       nss.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5
  nss-sysinit.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5                  nss-tools.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5             oprofile.x86_64 0:0.9.7-1.0.1.el6
  pango.x86_64 0:1.28.1-7.0.1.el6_3                        plymouth-scripts.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1    policycoreutils.x86_64 0:2.0.83-19.39.0.1.el6
  ql2400-firmware.noarch 0:7.03.00-1.0.1.el6               ql2500-firmware.noarch 0:7.03.00-1.0.1.el6        redhat-lsb.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6
  redhat-lsb-compat.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6                 redhat-lsb-core.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6            redhat-lsb-graphics.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6
  redhat-lsb-printing.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6               rsyslog.x86_64 0:5.8.10-8.0.1.el6                 selinux-policy.noarch 0:3.7.19-231.0.1.el6_5.3
  selinux-policy-targeted.noarch 0:3.7.19-231.0.1.el6_5.3  sos.noarch 0:2.2-47.0.1.el6_5.7                   system-config-network-tui.noarch 0:1.6.0.el6.3-1.0.1.el6
  systemtap-runtime.x86_64 0:2.3-4.0.1.el6_5               udev.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6                    yum.noarch 0:3.2.29-43.0.1.el6_5
  yum-plugin-fastestmirror.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5    yum-plugin-security.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5  yum-utils.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5
Replaced:
  kernel-headers.x86_64 0:2.6.32-431.29.2.el6
Complete!

[root@test-centos ~]# cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.5
[root@test-centos ~]# rpm -qi --info "oraclelinux-release"
Name        : oraclelinux-release          Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version     : 6Server                           Vendor: Oracle America
Release     : 5.0.2                         Build Date: Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:50 AM ICT
Install Date: Fri 19 Sep 2014 03:54:33 PM ICT      Build Host: ca-build44.us.oracle.com
Group       : System Environment/Base       Source RPM: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.src.rpm
Size        : 49559                            License: GPL
Signature   : RSA/8, Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:56 AM ICT, Key ID 72f97b74ec551f03
Summary     : Oracle Linux 6 release file
Description :
System release and information files
Name        : oraclelinux-release          Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version     : 6Server                           Vendor: Oracle America
Release     : 5.0.2                         Build Date: Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:50 AM ICT
Install Date: Fri 19 Sep 2014 03:54:33 PM ICT      Build Host: ca-build44.us.oracle.com
Group       : System Environment/Base       Source RPM: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.src.rpm
Size        : 49559                            License: GPL
Signature   : RSA/8, Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:56 AM ICT, Key ID 72f97b74ec551f03
Summary     : Oracle Linux 6 release file
Description :
System release and information files
[root@test-centos ~]#It's very fast... Written By: Surachart Opun http://surachartopun.com
Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 – XML and JSON presentations, meetings and Hands-On Labs

Marco Gralike - Fri, 2014-09-19 02:30
Oracle OpenWorld is about to start and I am looking forward to it. This year I will be able to learn and enjoy it a...

Read More

Oracle Priority Service Ijnfogram for 18-SEP-2014

Oracle Infogram - Thu, 2014-09-18 17:50

OpenWorld
From Chris Warticki's Blog - Oracle Support: OOW - Focus On Oracle Support.
From Oracle Fusion Middleware: You are invited! See the Power of Innovation with Oracle Fusion Middleware.
From Fusion Applications Developer Relations: Our Recommendations for OpenWorld 2014.
Hadoop Hands-on Lab Oracle OpenWorld 2014, from The art of virtualization.
From Brendan Tierney- Oralytics Blog: Analytics Hands on Labs at OOW 14. And for a more thorough run-down of the events: Oracle Advanced Analytics sessions at OOW14.
From Market Wired: Join the Global MySQL Community at MySQL Central @ OpenWorld.
RDBMS
From DaDBm: Roadmap of Oracle Database releases.
Java
From The Java Source: Java's NewConsole Tool.
SOA
From the AMIS Technology Blog: Oracle SOA Suite 11g and 12c: Determining composite dependencies to the level of operations.
APEX
From Dimitri Gielis Blog (Oracle Application Express - APEX): APEX 5.0: Bye bye Tabs, welcome to Navigation Lists
Big Data
From Data Science Central: 32 articles and resources from leading authors and practitioners (weekly selection)
Database Theory and Practice
Oracle Bloom Filters from Database Journal.
From Vertabelo: 18 Best Online Resources For Learning SQL and Database Concepts.
UNIX and Oracle
From Bobby Durrett's DBA Blog: ps and top differences with HugePages.
MySQL
From Oracle University: MySQL Cluster - What You Need To Know.
EBS
From Online Identity & Access Management: Oracle Upgrade – from R12.2.3 to R12.2.4
From the Oracle E-Business Suite Support Blog:
New Functionality - Invoice Approval Parallel Processing
Want a Quick Way to Keep Current on Procurement Information with Direct Links to our Social Media Channels?
From the Oracle E-Business Suite Technology Blog:
Integrating Custom and Third-Party Products With EBS 12.2
E-Business Suite Technology Sessions at OpenWorld 2014
DSTv23 Timezone Patches Available for E-Business Suite 12
Preventing "Java was blocked" IE Warnings with Oracle EBS
Invoking JAVA APIs via REST in EBS 12.2

Firefox ESR 31 Certified with Oracle E-Business Suite

Oracle OEM Cloud Control 12.1.0.4 - the new features

Yann Neuhaus - Thu, 2014-09-18 17:01

This document describes the main new features of Cloud Control 12.1.0.4. A lot of new features are coming with the 12.1.0.4 version I will describe the most important ones, but you can also refer to this Oracle documen: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E24628_01/doc.121/e25353/whats_new.htm#CEGFFGBI

 

New management services repository page

There is a new management services repository page providing details about the management repository:

 

cc1

 

In the Setup Menu—> Manager Cloud Control, select health overview:

 

cc2

 

You have access to a new performance page:

 

cc3

 

This new Enterprise Manager Performance Page is providing precious performance informations in order to help administrators to check the overall performance of their Enterprise Manager infrastructure.

 

cc4

 

Oracle BI Publisher

Oracle BI Publisher 11g is now installed by default with Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12.1.0.4, but it is not configured by default. A post installation configuration step has to be done in order to configure the BI Publisher server.

 

New Security Console

A new Security Console allows the administrators to have a single entry point where they can view, analyze, or optimize the security for their environment.

In the Setup menu, select Security, then Security Console:

 

cc5

cc6


This new security console displays your Enterprise Manager security configuration and allows you to view, analyze and optimize the security for your environment.

The categories are:

  • Pluggable authentication (LDAP authentication, Oracle access manager, Oracle SSO based authentication...)
  • Fine-grained Access Control (target and resource privilege, list of super administrator...)
  • Secure Communication (Https and public key infrastructure, Oms secure configuration, Database Encryption configuration)
  • Credentials Management
  • Comprehensive Auditing (Current auditing configuration, Specific Audit operations, Audit Usage Statistics)
  • Active User Session Count (Session settings, active sessions)
  • Best Practices Analysis (quick view of Enterprise Manager Security configuration)

 

cc7

 

Apply privilege delegation template

Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.4 allows to apply a default privilege delegation template setting to one newly discovered host, or many already discovered hosts.

This new feature is very interesting for administrators when a lot of new host targets have been added to Enterprise Manager Cloud Control. We can also use emcli with the set_default_privilege_delegation verb to apply those privileges to hosts.

 

cc8

 

In the Setup Menu à Security, we select Privilege Delegation:

 

cc9

 

We can display the templates:

 

cc10

 

We apply the template to multiple hosts:

 

cc11

 

The SUDO_TEMPLATE has been successfully applied to mutliple hosts:

 

Emcli

New emcli verbs are available in the 12.1.0.4 version. The command emcli help will show you the new features.

The following ones are especially interesting:

  • get_not_updatable_agents: displays agents not updatable
  • get_updatable_agents: displays updatable Agents
  • update_agents:  performs Agent Update Prereqs and submits Agent Update Job
  • delete_incident_record:   deletes incidents based on the provided IDs, up to a maximum of 20 incidents.
  • resume_job: resumes a job
  • suspend_job:  suspends a job
  • clear_default_privilege_delegation_setting: clears the default privilege delegation settings for a platform.
  • set_default_privilege_delegation_setting: sets the default privilege delegation setting for one or more platforms
  • test_privilege_delegation_setting: tests Privilege Delegation Setting on a host

 

Plugin management

We can deploy multiple plugins from the Cloud Control Console in one operation. This new feature will help administrators to reduce the number of OMS restarts during the fastidious plugins deployment:

 

cc12

 

Metric alert message customization

Metric alert messages can be customized in order to be more understandable or to be compliant with the data centers' wording convention. As you can see in the following screenshot, checking the Edit Alert Message allows the Enterprise Manager Administrator to modify the error message:

 

cc13

 

Metric collection schedule enhancement

We now have the possibility to enter a starting time for a metric collection, if the schedule frequency is defined by days, by weeks, weekly or monthly. This new feature might be very interesting for administrators when the metric is time sensitive.

 

cc14

 

Advanced Threshold Management

With Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.4, the Advanced Threshold Management new feature allows us to compute adaptive thresholds (self-adjusting) or time-based thresholds.

Now, in the Metric and collections settings, you can display different kinds of metrics:

 

cc15

 

Adaptive thresholds

Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.4 has improved the alerting mechanism with the adaptive thresholds. Generally the normal expected set metrics values are depending on the workload of the target, so the threshold value is too low or too high. The adaptive thresholds are calculated about a target’s baseline value.

For example (see below), you can define a warning or a critical threshold to high (95 %), very high (99 %), severe (99,9 %) and extreme value (99.99 %).

Select Adaptive Threshold:

 

cc16

 

cc17

 

Select Quick Configuration:

 

cc18

 

Choose Primary OLTP, for example:

 

cc19

 

Select Finish:

 

cc20

 

Then you can edit and modify the thresholds values:

 

cc21

 

Time based statics thresholds

As database activity is quite different during the day where a lot of users are conected, and the night where the main activity is concerning the batch jobs, this new feature allows the administrators to define higher thresholds value for a metric during the night.

For example in the Metric and Collection Settings:

 

cc22

 

We select Advanced Threshold Management in the Related Links:

 

cc23

 

By selecting the Threshold Change Frequency, you can adapt the warning and critical values, depending of the time of the day (or week):

cc24

 

Day is 7 AM to 7 PM in target timezone, night means 7 PM to 7 AM in target timezone, weekdays means Monday to Friday, and weekend means Sunday and Saturday.

 

Incident rule set simulator

The new Rule Set Simulator in the Incident Rule screen displays you the rules to which the event will apply. By this way administrators can test its rules without executing the actins specified in the rules like emailing or opening tickets.

 

cc25

cc26

 

Incident manager

There are some new features in the incident screen manager screen.

When looking at an incident, the related event tab displays recent configuration changes, helping administrators to solve the problem:


cc27

 

The notification tab displays now all the notifications sent for the event or the incident (email, SNMP traps …).

 

SNMP V3

The new SNMP version 3 protocols offer more security sending information from Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.4 and third party management systems. SNMPv3 includes three important services: authentication, privacy, and access control.

 

cc28

 

Faster target Down notifications

The target down detection (concerning hosts, database instance, WebLogic Server, Management Agent) has been improved in terms of quickness of detection. Oracle documentation says the target down monitoring is detected within seconds, the tests I made showed me it was true, the target down incident has been generated in some seconds.

 

Enhanced agent and host down detection

Every Enterprise Administrator has encountered problems with agents going down or not communicating anymore with the OMS. The new Enterprise Manager 12.1.0.4 version has added a sub status icon allowing the administrator to discover the reason why the agent is in an unreachable state.

 

cc29

 

When an agent goes down unexpectedly, in the Manager Cloud Control agent page you can select the symptom analysis icon which may help you to determine the root cause of the problem:

 

cc30

 

When an agent goes down unexpectedly, you can select the symptom analysis icon in the Manager Cloud Control agent page which may help you to determine the root cause of the problem.

 

Role and target property when adding a target

When adding a target database to a host managed by an agent 12.1.0.4, we have the possibility to specify the global target properties:

 

cc31

 

We can also explicitly specify a group for the targets:

 

cc32

 

New Job progress screen

 

oracle@vmtestoraem12c:/home/oracle/ [oms12c] emctl set property -name oracle.sysman.core.jobs.ui.useAdfExecutionUi -value true

Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c Release 4

Copyright (c) 1996, 2014 Oracle Corporation.

All rights reserved.

SYSMAN password:

Property oracle.sysman.core.jobs.ui.useAdfExecutionUi has been set to value true for all Management Servers

OMS restart is not required to reflect the new property value

 

Before setting this property to true, when selecting a job we only could view the following screen:

 

cc33

 

After setting the property to true:

 

cc34

 

Conclusion

A lot of new interesting features are present in the 12.1.0.4 version. I would particularly mention the Advanced Threshold Management and the new Security Console, which will help administrators to be more and more proactive in their job.

Datafile space reclaimable report.

DBA Scripts and Articles - Thu, 2014-09-18 14:45

This script will help you find the space reclaimable in your datafiles, it finds the High Water Mark of all your datafiles (the minimum size) and then report the following information: Datafile Size Datafile HWM Percentage of space reclaimable Command to resize the datafile Total space reclaimable in your datafiles Percentage of space reclaimable in your datafiles Find space reclaimable [...]

The post Datafile space reclaimable report. appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

PeopleTools Simplifies Internet Explorer Certifications

PeopleSoft Technology Blog - Thu, 2014-09-18 14:17

With the GA of PeopleTools 8.54 a couple months ago, customers have been reviewing the certification requirements for PeopleTools 8.54 as they plan their upgrades.  A number of questions have come up recently dealing with certified browsers.  Just last month, I blogged about the Internet Explorer requirements required to support the new Fluid UI.

We’ve made a change recently to simplify the Internet Explorer browser environment for PeopleTools.  Oracle has moved to model where we will support all of the operating systems that Microsoft supports for a particular release of IE.  When the certification details are reviewed on the Certifications tab in MyOracleSupport, we will no longer call out each of the supported operating systems.

Following this change, I’ve received some additional browser related inquiries.  Some customers were hoping that this would mean Windows XP could hang around in their environment a bit longer.  A question was raised as to whether or not we would support PeopleSoft running IE 11 on Windows XP. Yes, that’s the operating system that was released back on Oct 25, 2001.  The very simple answer is a very firm ‘NO’.  Microsoft’s mainstream support for Windows XP ended back in 2009, and extended support ended in of April of this year.  Microsoft is even attempting to make it clear that XP is dead.  PeopleSoft can’t support dead operating systems.

New IE browser releases will continue to require explicit certification testing prior to certification – at least for now.  When a new release is certified, it will be certified across all operating systems that Microsoft supports the release with mainstream support. 

Do you have a question on browser certifications?  For this or other platform certification questions, be sure to attend PeopleTools Roadmap – Platforms (session CON7590) at Openworld on Wednesday, Oct 1, at 12:45 in Moscone West - room 2022.  See you there!

Oracle Applications Cloud Release 8 User Experience Rapid Development Kit

Angelo Santagata - Thu, 2014-09-18 12:10

Good resources from the UX Team

If you’re building or integrating the Oracle Applications Cloud or building SaaS through PaaS, use the User Experience Rapid Development Kit laid out here to get the guidance you need and point you to the right tools to use.

The Oracle Applications User Experience team has released a User Experience Rapid Development Kit on simplified user interface (UI), the same user experience design in Oracle Applications Cloud release 8. The kit is designed to help Oracle ADF developers get up to speed quickly so they can start designing and building the Oracle Applications Cloud simplified UIs, which are the tablet-friendly UIs for Oracle Sales Cloud and Oracle HCM Cloud, in a matter of hours.

The User Experience Rapid Development Kit contains the following tools:

  • Coded ADF page templates.
  • Coding tips from Oracle’s developers.
  • ADF screen overlays showing the use of components in the simplified UI.
  • An eBook on user experience (UX) design patterns and guidelines(right), and example wireframe stencils of page types and components in Microsoft Visio and Balsamiq Mockups formats.
  • Sample wireframe of a simplified UI page flow.

How would you like to get started?

Tell me more about the simplified user interface for Oracle Applications Cloud.

Show me demos of simplified UI in the Oracle Applications Cloud.

What’s coming next in the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience?

Start Designing and Building a Simplified User Interface

Learn more

Helix: View of an LMS designed for competency-based education

Michael Feldstein - Thu, 2014-09-18 11:42

Within higher education, we tend to talk about LMS solutions based on an institutional perspective – which systems can serve as the official LMS for an entire institution. While this view is important and forms the basis for my LMS graphics, the emergence of new educational delivery models has led to the development of some interesting program-specific LMS models. One example that I have already written about is 2U’s platform (built on top of Moodle and Adobe Connect) for their specific Online Service Provider (OSP) business.

One educational model that is becoming more and more important is competency-based education (CBE). One of the challenges for this model is that the traditional LMS – based on a traditional model using grades, seat time and synchronous cohort of students – is not easily adapted to serve CBE needs. As described in this CBE primer:

OBE [Outcome-based education] can be implemented in various modalities, including face-to-face, online and hybrid models.

Competency-based education (CBE) is a narrower concept, a subset or instance of OBE, where the outcomes are more closely tied to job skills or employment needs, and the methods are typically self-paced. Again based on the Malan article, the six critical components of CBE are as follows:

  1. Explicit learning outcomes with respect to the required skills and concomitant proficiency (standards for assessment)
  2. A flexible time frame to master these skills
  3. A variety of instructional activities to facilitate learning
  4. Criterion-referenced testing of the required outcomes
  5. Certification based on demonstrated learning outcomes
  6. Adaptable programs to ensure optimum learner guidance

Enter Helix (again)

In 2008 Altius Education, started by Paul Freedman, worked with Tiffin University to create a new entity called Ivy Bridge College. The goal of Ivy Bridge was to help students get associate degrees and then transfer to a four-year program. Altius developed the Helix LMS specifically for this mission. All was fine until the regional accrediting agency shut down Ivy Bridge with only three months notice.[1]

The end result was that Altius sold the LMS and much of the engineering team to Datamark in 2013. Datamark is an educational services firm with a focus on leveraging data. With the acquisition of the Helix technology, Datamark could expand into the teaching and learning process, leading them to rebrand as Helix Education – a sign of the centrality of the LMS to the company’s strategy. Think of Helix Education now as an OSP (a la carte services that don’t require tuition revenue sharing) with an emphasis on CBE programs.

I asked the Helix team to give me a demo of their tool, with permission to do screen grabs, to get a better sense of the system design and inter-relationship with CBE. The goal is to understand some of the nuances brought about by a CBE design focus, based on 3 of the 6 components from SPT Malan. I am not trying to judge better or worse in terms of LMS design but rather to get a better visualization of the implications of CBE.

First – the main page:

classroom

1) Explicit Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes are embedded throughout the course, including the ability to allow a pretest and determine the starting set of competencies.

pretest_feedback

From a faculty and / or course designer standpoint, there is also a view to determine the coverage of competencies within the course.

OutcomesCoverageReport

2) Flexible Time Frame

The system gives estimates of the time required for most tasks and allows the student to choose their own course plan. The “schedule” then adjusts based on the course plan.

CreateCoursePlan

Because the course is essentially self-paced, Helix adds some features to allow peer assessment and discussions, often in an asynchronous manner (based on current and past discussions of students at the same point in the course, but allowing real-time faculty interaction).

Answer Forum - student

Students can ‘like’ and choose to ‘follow’ different discussions. I asked if students can ‘follow’ other students, and the answer was no (but possible in roadmap).

AnswerForum

6) Adaptable Programs / Learner Guidance

This one was interesting, as Helix allows students to select different levels of guidance – hints, examples, step-by-step, etc.

practice

Notes
  • I am doing some research to see if I can get other examples from CBE programs, but there seems to be movement of newer educational models, including CBE, becoming more likely to develop program-specific LMS solutions.
  • While the Helix team stated that the assessments (formative and summative) can be set up with essays or other non-multiple-choice formats, the overall view of this platform gives a good view of the fairly prescriptive, objectivist nature of CBE.[2]
  • Helix stated several times during the demo that the LMS could be applied to non-CBE programs, but my focus was on the CBE nature of the system.
  • Helix is building up its management team, including several key hires with a background at eCollege (acquired by Pearon in 2007), Western Governors University and DeVry University.
  • Finally, this feature is not CBE-based, but I do like the ability for students to provide feedback on lessons within the course itself.

LessonFeedback

  1. More on that sad tale in this post as well as this Chronicle article.
  2. See Tony Bates article for more on this topic.

The post Helix: View of an LMS designed for competency-based education appeared first on e-Literate.

How to transition government databases to the cloud

Chris Foot - Thu, 2014-09-18 10:37

Public authorities are regarding the benefits of moving operations to the cloud with a grain of salt. 

While security will be a concern no matter what the technology, the primary reason why officials are so apprehensive of cloud computing is a perceived lack of control. A number of organizations already outsource to remote database administration services to secure environments and keep critical solutions operable, but putting an entire infrastructure in the hands of a private company is quite jarring. 

Hesitating to advance 
InformationWeek contributor Elena Malykhina noted a survey of 153 government IT executives conducted by MeriTalk, which discovered 43 percent of respondents compared transitioning processes to the cloud to giving his or her son keys to a new convertible. The research also acknowledged the following findings:

  • Out of nine in 10 agencies, 42 percent are keeping security responsibilities on-remise while 41 percent are obligating cloud vendors to obtain cloud defense certifications.
  • Exactly half of respondents are incapable of identifying which departments own certain data.
  • More than half (55 percent) believe cloud technology will make it easier for authorities to organize digital information

As one can see, the general sentiment among many federal IT managers is that they lack the expertise and assistance needed to manage their databases and transition those implementations to cloud environments. 

The rules of the trade 
It's possible for remote DBAs to help allay these concerns. Replicating databases before migration and monitoring environments post-transition are both possible when outside assistance is received. With this in mind, there are several rules Government Computer News advised authorities to keep in mind in regard to cloud technology:

  1. Employ virtualization beforehand: In short, virtualization optimizes servers by allowing them to run more applications than is conventionally possible. The technology provides the basis of cloud computing.
  2. It doesn't have to be public: Surrendering all operations to a cloud provider isn't necessary. Private and hybrid environments are both valid options, as they allow organizations to exercise more control over their architectures. 
  3. Look for compliance: One thing many government entities are already doing quite well is searching for cloud providers that satisfy standards defined by the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program. 
  4. Start with applications: Use Software-as-a-Service deployments before transitioning all IT assets over to the cloud. This will get users and administrators used to the technology. 

Cloud computing isn't anything to be fearful of, but that doesn't mean cautionary steps shouldn't be taken. Consulting specialists to diagnose a provider's capabilities will give agencies a clear idea of whether a particular hosting company is the right fit for them. 

The post How to transition government databases to the cloud appeared first on Remote DBA Experts.

OOW - Focus On Oracle Support

Chris Warticki - Thu, 2014-09-18 08:00
Focus On Oracle Support   Monday, Sep 29, 2014

Conference Sessions

Best Practices for Maintaining and Supporting Oracle Enterprise Manager
Farouk Abushaban, Senior Principal Technical Analyst, Oracle
2:45 PM - 3:30 PM Intercontinental - Grand Ballroom C CON8567 Oracle WebLogic Server: Best Practices for Troubleshooting Performance Issues
Laurent Goldsztejn, Principal Engineer, Proactive Support, Oracle
4:00 PM - 4:45 PM Moscone South - 270 CON8307 Oracle Exadata: Maintenance and Support Best Practices
Christian Trieb, CDO, Paragon Data GmbH
Jaime Figueroa, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
Bennett Fleisher, Customer Support Director, Oracle
4:00 PM - 4:45 PM Moscone South - 310 CON8259 Monday, Sep 29, 2014

Conference Sessions

Best Practices for Maintaining and Supporting Oracle Database
Balaji Bashyam, Vice President, Oracle
Roderick Manalac, Consulting Tech Advisor, Oracle
11:45 AM - 12:30 PM Moscone South - 310 CON8270 Prevention: Best Practices for Proactively Supporting Oracle E-Business Suite
Deidre Engstrom, Sr. Director, EBS, Proactive Support, Oracle
1:30 PM - 2:15 PM Moscone West - 2020 CON8575 Understanding Patching for Your Oracle Fusion Cloud Services
Marc Lamarche, Senior Director, Global Fusion HCM Support, Oracle
5:15 PM - 6:00 PM Moscone West - 3007 CON8476 Tuesday, Sep 30, 2014

Conference Sessions

Best Practices for Maintaining Oracle Fusion Middleware
Ken Vincent, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
10:45 AM - 11:30 AM Moscone West - 3022 CON8285 Oracle Database 12c Upgrade: Tools and Best Practices from Oracle Support
Agrim Pandit, Principal Software Engineer, Oracle
5:00 PM - 5:45 PM Moscone South - 310 CON8236 Wednesday, Oct 01, 2014

Conference Sessions

Oracle Solaris: Best Practices for Maintenance and Upgrades
Walter Fisch, Director, Solaris & Network Domain, Oracle
Alfred Mayerhofer, Sr Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
10:15 AM - 11:00 AM Intercontinental - Grand Ballroom A CON8312 Composite Deployment in Oracle SOA Suite
Antonella Giovannetti, SOA Proactive Support Engineer, Oracle
11:30 AM - 12:15 PM Moscone South - 236 CON8568 Best Practices: SQL Tuning Made Easier with SQLTXPLAIN (SQLT)
Mauro Pagano, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
12:45 PM - 1:30 PM Moscone South - 310 CON8266 Proactive Support Best Practices: Oracle E-Business Suite Payables and Payments
Stephen Horgan, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
Andrew Lumpe, Senior Principal Support Engineer, Oracle
2:00 PM - 2:45 PM Moscone West - 3006 CON8479 Sys Admin Best Practices: Maintaining Oracle Server and Storage Systems
Daniel Green, Sr Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
Jeff Nieusma, Senior Principal Engineer, Oracle
3:30 PM - 4:15 PM Intercontinental - Intercontinental C CON8313 Thursday, Oct 02, 2014

Conference Sessions

JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Performance Tips and Baseline Tuning
James Booth, Senior Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
9:30 AM - 10:15 AM Moscone West - 2020 CON8323 System Support: Learn How to Automate Service Requests and Improve Resolution Time
Remco Lengers, Sr. Manager Proactive Support, Oracle
Michael Mcdonnell, X86 & ES Automation Lead, Oracle
10:45 AM - 11:30 AM Marriott Marquis - Salon 1/2/3* CON9132 Best Practices for Maintaining Your Oracle RAC Cluster
William Burton, Consulting Member of Technical Staff, Oracle
Scott Jesse, Customer Support Director, RAC, Storage & RAC Assurance, Oracle
Bryan Vongray, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Moscone South - 310 CON8252 PeopleSoft: Support in the Age of Update Manager
Ganesan Sankaran, Principal Support Engineer, Oracle
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Moscone West - 2020 CON8325 Best Practices for Maintaining Siebel CRM
PREM Lakshmanan, Senior Director Customer Support, Oracle
Iain Mcgonigle, Senior Director, Customer Support, Oracle
12:45 PM - 1:30 PM Moscone West - 3009 CON8314 Best Practices for Patching and Maintaining Oracle E-Business Suite
Jason Brincat, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
Bill Burbage, Sr Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
1:15 PM - 2:00 PM Moscone West - 3006 CON8478 Best Practices for Maintaining Primavera EPPM Solutions
Michael Kieffer, Senior Manager, Oracle
Mary Wiedenman, Sr. Program Manager, Oracle
2:30 PM - 3:15 PM Marriott Marquis - Salon 1/2/3* CON8576 Thursday, Oct 02, 2014

Conference Sessions

Best Practices for Supporting Oracle Hyperion EPM and Business Intelligence Solutions
Dave Valociek, Senior Director, Customer Support, Technology - EPM/BI, Oracle
Mitra Veluri, Senior Principal Technical Support Engineer, Oracle
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Moscone West - 3008 CON8309    My Oracle Support Monday Mix

Monday, Sep 29

Join us for a fun and relaxing happy hour at the annual My Oracle Support Monday Mix happening Monday, September 29 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the ThirstyBear Brewing Company – just a 3 minute walk from Moscone Center. Admission is free for Premier Support customers with your Oracle OpenWorld badge. For more information, visit oracle.com/goto/mondaymix 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM ThirstyBear Brewing Company Oracle Support Stars Bar & Mini Briefing Center

Monday, Sep 29

Visit us Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday during exhibition hall hours. Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and services, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 6:00 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

Tuesday, Sep 30

Visit us Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday during exhibition hall hours. Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and services, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 6:00 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

Wednesday, Oct 29

Visit us Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday during exhibition hall hours. Ask the stars of Oracle Support your toughest questions, learn about proactive support tools and services, and win a prize at one of our 10-minute mini-briefings where you are sure to leave with valuable tips and best practices based on our experience supporting Oracle customers around the globe. 9:45 AM - 3:45 PM Moscone West Exhibition Hall, 3461 and 3908

To secure a seat in a session, please use Schedule Builder to add to your Schedule.

Can chatting make you more productive?

David Haimes - Thu, 2014-09-18 07:39

According to the CEB Corporate Leadership Council High Performance Survey, 2012, the average worker collaborates with 10 or more people to accomplish day to day tasks.  That is a lot of chatting.  We think that this chatting needs to be be tied to the business transaction you are working with and the best way to do that is by having the collaboration tool as part of your ERP application.  This is what you get with Oracle ERP Cloud.  I have discussed what social is in the ERP Cloud world in my earlier post Socializing the Finance Department that you can review to get a background.  The key message here is that the collaboration must be tied to a transaction.  Take a look at the video below to illustrate the point and see it in action.

I think you will agree this type of chatting, or as Alan Leposfsky (@alanlepo) of Constellation Research would call it, purposeful collaboration, clearly does make you and your organization more productive.


Categories: APPS Blogs

Getting The Users’ Trust – Part 2

Rittman Mead Consulting - Thu, 2014-09-18 04:35

Last time I wrote about the performance aspects of a BI system and how they could affect a user’s confidence. I concluded by mentioning that incorrect data might be generated by poorly coded ETL routines causing data loss or duplication. This time I am looking more at the quality of the data we load (or don’t load).

Back in the 1990’s I worked with a 4.5 TB DWH that had a single source for fact and reference data, that is the data loaded was self-consistent. Less and less these days we find a single source DWH to be the case; we are adding multiple data sources (both internal and external). Customers can now appear on CRM, ERP, social media, credit referencing, loyalty, and a whole host of other systems. This proliferation of data sources gives rise to a variety of issues we need to be at least aware of, and in reality, should be actively managing. Some of these issues require us to work out processing rules within our data warehouse such as what do we do with fact data that arrives before its supporting reference data; I once had a system where our customer source could only be extracted once a week but purchases made by new customers would appear in our fact feed immediately after customer registration. Obviously, it is a business call on whether we publish facts that involve yet to be loaded customers straight away or defer those loads until the customer has been processed in the DWH. In the case of my example we needed to auto-create new customers in the data warehouse with just the minimum of data, the surrogate key and the business key and then do a SCD type 1update when the full customer data profile is loaded the following week. Technical issues such as these are trivial, we formulate and agree a business rule to define our actions and we implement it in our ETL or, possibly, the reporting code. In my opinion the bigger issues to resolve are in Data Governance and Data Quality.

Some people combine Data Quality and Governance together as a single topic and believe that a single solution will put all right. However, to my mind, they are completely separate issues. Data quality is about the content of the data and governance is about ownership, providence and business management of the data. Today, Data Governance is increasingly becoming a regulatory requirement, especially in finance.

Governance is much more than the data lineage tools we might access in ETL tools such as ODI and even OWB. ETL lineage is about source to target mappings; our ability to say that ‘bank branch name’ comes from this source attribute, travels through these multiple ODI mappings and finally updates that column in our BANK_BRANCH dimension table. In true Data Governance we probably do some or all of these:

  • Create a dictionary of approved business terms. This will define every attribute in business terms and also provide translations between geographic and business-unit centric ways of viewing data. In finance one division may talk about “customer”, another division will say “investor”, a third says “borrower”; in all three cases we are really talking about the same kind of object, a person. This dictionary should go down to the level of individual attribute and measures and include the type of data being held such as text, currency, date-time, these data types are logical types and not physical types as seen on the actual sources. It is important that this dictionary is shared throughout the organisation and is “the true definition” of what is reported.
  • Define ownership (or stewardship) for the approved business data item.
  • Map business data sources and targets to our approved list of terms (at attribute level). It is very possible that some attributes will have multiple potential sources, in such cases we must specify which source will be the master source.
  • Define processes to keep our business data aligned.  
  • Define ownership for the sources for design (and for static data such as ISO country codes, content) change accountability. Possibility integrate into change notification mechanism of change process.
  • Define data release processes for approved external reference data.
  • Define data access and redaction rules for compliance purposes.
  • Build-in audit and control.
As you can see we are not, in the main, talking data content, instead we are improving our description of the business data over that are already held in database data dictionaries and XSD files. This is still metadata and is almost certainly best managed in some kind of Data Governance application. One tool we might consider for this is Oracle Data Relationship Manager from the Hyperion family of products. If we want to go more DIY it may be possible to leverage some of the data responsibility features of Oracle SQL Developer Data Modeller.

Whereas governance is about using the right data and having processes and people to guarantee it is correctly sourced, Data Quality is much finer in grain and looks at the actual content. Here a tool such as Oracle Enterprise Data Quality is invaluable. By the way I have noticed that OEDQ version 12 has recently been released, I have a blog on this in the pipeline.

I tend to divide Data Quality into three disciplines:

  • Data Profiling is always going to be our first step. Before we fix things we need to know what to fix! Generally, we try to profile a sample of the data and assess it column by column, row by row to build a picture of the actual content. Typically we look at data range, nulls, number of distinct values and in the case of text data: character types used (alpha, letter case, numeric, accents, punctuation etc), regular expressions. From this we develop a plan to tackle quality, for example on a data entry web-page we may want to tighten processing rules to prevent certain “anticipated” errors; more usually we come up with business rules to apply in our next stage. 
  • Data Assessment. Here we test the full dataset against the developed rules to identify data that conforms or needs remedy. This remedy could be referring the data back to the source system owner for correction, providing a set of data fixes to apply to the source which can be validated and applied as a batch, creating processes to “fix” data on the source at initial data entry, or (and I would strongly advise against this for governance reasons) dynamically fix in an ETL process. The reason I am against fixing data downstream in ETL is that the data we report on in our Data Warehouse is not going to match the source and this will be problematic when we try to validate if our data warehouse fits reality.
  • Data de-duplication. This final discipline of our DQ process is the most difficult, identifying data that is potentially duplicated in our data feed. In data quality terms a duplicate is where two or more rows refer to what is probably (statistically) the same item, this is a lot more fuzzy than an exact match in database terms; people miskey data, call centre staff mis-hear names, companies merge and combine data sets, I have even seen customers registering a new email address because they can not be bothered to reset their password on a e-selling website. De-duplication is important to improve the accuracy of BI in general, it is nigh-on mandatory for organisations that need to manage risk and prevent fraud.
Data Quality is so important to trusted BI; without it we run the risk that our dimensions do not roll-up correctly and that we under-report by separating our duplicates. However, being correct at the data warehouse is only part of the story, these corrections also need to be on the sources; to do that we have to implement processes and disciplines throughout the organisation.   For BI that users can trust we need to combine both data management disciplines. From governance we need to be sure that we are using the correct business terms for all attributes and that the data displayed in those attributes has made the correct journey from the original source. From quality we gain confidence that we are correctly aggregating data in our reporting.   At the end of the day we need to be right to be trusted.

 

 

Categories: BI & Warehousing