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JRE 1.8.0_101/102 Certified with Oracle EBS 12.x

Steven Chan - Wed, 2016-07-20 02:07

Java logo

Java Runtime Environment 1.8.0_101 (a.k.a. JRE 8u101-b13) and its corresponding Patch Set Update (PSU) JRE 1.8.0_102 and later updates on the JRE 8 codeline are now certified with Oracle E-Business Suite 12.1 and 12.2 for Windows desktop clients.

All JRE 6, 7, and 8 releases are certified with EBS upon release

Our standard policy is that all E-Business Suite customers can apply all JRE updates to end-user desktops:

  • From JRE 1.6.0_03 and later updates on the JRE 6 codeline
  • From JRE 1.7.0_10 and later updates on the JRE 7 codeline 
  • From JRE 1.8.0_25 and later updates on the JRE 8 codeline
We test all new JRE releases in parallel with the JRE development process, so all new JRE releases are considered certified with the E-Business Suite on the same day that they're released by our Java team. 

You do not need to wait for a certification announcement before applying new JRE 6, 7, or 8 releases to your EBS users' desktops.

What's new in this release?

Oracle now releases a Critical Patch update (CPU) at the same time as the corresponding Patch Set Update (PSU) release for Java SE 8.

  • CPU Release:  JRE 1.8.0_101
  • PSU Release:  JRE 1.8.0_102
Oracle recommends that Oracle E-Business Suite customers use the CPU release (JRE 1.8.0_101) and only upgrade to the PSU release (1.8.0_102) if they require a specific bug fix.  For further information and bug fix details see Java CPU and PSU Releases Explained.

32-bit and 64-bit versions certified

This certification includes both the 32-bit and 64-bit JRE versions for various Windows operating systems. See the respective Recommended Browser documentation for your EBS release for details.

Where are the official patch requirements documented?

All patches required for ensuring full compatibility of the E-Business Suite with JRE 8 are documented in these Notes:

For EBS 12.1 & 12.2

EBS + Discoverer 11g Users

This JRE release is certified for Discoverer 11g in E-Business Suite environments with the following minimum requirements:

Implications of Java 6 and 7 End of Public Updates for EBS Users

The Oracle Java SE Support Roadmap and Oracle Lifetime Support Policy for Oracle Fusion Middleware documents explain the dates and policies governing Oracle's Java Support.  The client-side Java technology (Java Runtime Environment / JRE) is now referred to as Java SE Deployment Technology in these documents.

Starting with Java 7, Extended Support is not available for Java SE Deployment Technology.  It is more important than ever for you to stay current with new JRE versions.

If you are currently running JRE 6 on your EBS desktops:

  • You can continue to do so until the end of Java SE 6 Deployment Technology Extended Support in June 2017
  • You can obtain JRE 6 updates from My Oracle Support.  See:

If you are currently running JRE 7 on your EBS desktops:

  • You can continue to do so until the end of Java SE 7 Deployment Technology Premier Support in July 2016
  • You can obtain JRE 7 updates from My Oracle Support.  See:

If you are currently running JRE 8 on your EBS desktops:

Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JRE 8 for Windows desktop clients?

No.

This upgrade is highly recommended but remains optional while Java 6 and 7 are covered by Extended Support. Updates will be delivered via My Oracle Support, where you can continue to receive critical bug fixes and security fixes as well as general maintenance for JRE 6 and 7 desktop clients. Note that there are different impacts of enabling JRE Auto-Update depending on your current JRE release installed, despite the availability of ongoing support for JRE 6 and 7 for EBS customers; see the next section below.

Impact of enabling JRE Auto-Update

Java Auto-Update is a feature that keeps desktops up-to-date with the latest Java release.  The Java Auto-Update feature connects to java.com at a scheduled time and checks to see if there is an update available.

Enabling the JRE Auto-Update feature on desktops with JRE 6 installed will have no effect.

With the release of the January Critical patch Updates, the Java Auto-Update Mechanism will automatically update JRE 7 plug-ins to JRE 8.

Enabling the JRE Auto-Update feature on desktops with JRE 8 installed will apply JRE 8 updates.

Coexistence of multiple JRE releases Windows desktops

The upgrade to JRE 8 is recommended for EBS users, but some users may need to run older versions of JRE 6 or 7 on their Windows desktops for reasons unrelated to the E-Business Suite.

Most EBS configurations with IE and Firefox use non-static versioning by default. JRE 8 will be invoked instead of earlier JRE releases if both are installed on a Windows desktop. For more details, see "Appendix B: Static vs. Non-static Versioning and Set Up Options" in Notes 290807.1 and 393931.1.

What do Mac users need?

JRE 8 is certified for Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion), 10.9 (Mavericks), and 10.10 (Yosemite) desktops.  For details, see:

Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JDK 8 for EBS application tier servers?

No.

JRE is used for desktop clients.  JDK is used for application tier servers.

JRE 8 desktop clients can connect to EBS environments running JDK 6 or 7.

JDK 8 is not certified with the E-Business Suite.  EBS customers should continue to run EBS servers on JDK 6 or 7.

Known Iusses

Internet Explorer Performance Issue

Launching JRE 1.8.0_73 through Internet Explorer will have a delay of around 20 seconds before the applet starts to load (Java Console will come up if enabled).

This issue fixed in JRE 1.8.0_74.  Internet Explorer users are recommended to uptake this version of JRE 8.

Form Focus Issue

Clicking outside the frame during forms launch may cause a loss of focus when running with JRE 8 and can occur in all Oracle E-Business Suite releases. To fix this issue, apply the following patch:

References

Related Articles
Categories: APPS Blogs

JRE 1.7.0_111 Certified with Oracle E-Business Suite 12.x

Steven Chan - Wed, 2016-07-20 02:06

Java logo

Java Runtime Environment 1.7.0_111 (a.k.a. JRE 7u111-b13) and later updates on the JRE 7 codeline are now certified with Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12.x for Windows-based desktop clients.

All JRE 6, 7, and 8 releases are certified with EBS upon release

Our standard policy is that all E-Business Suite customers can apply all JRE updates to end-user desktops:

  • From JRE 1.6.0_03 and later updates on the JRE 6 codeline
  • From JRE 1.7.0_10 and later updates on the JRE 7 codeline 
  • From JRE 1.8.0_25 and later updates on the JRE 8 codeline
We test all new JRE releases in parallel with the JRE development process, so all new JRE releases are considered certified with the E-Business Suite on the same day that they're released by our Java team. 

You do not need to wait for a certification announcement before applying new JRE 6, 7, or 8 releases to your EBS users' desktops.

Effects of new support dates on Java upgrades for EBS environments

Support dates for the E-Business Suite and Java have changed.  Please review the sections below for more details:

  • What does this mean for Oracle E-Business Suite users?
  • Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JRE 7 for Windows desktop clients?
  • Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JDK 7 for EBS application tier servers?

32-bit and 64-bit versions certified

This certification includes both the 32-bit and 64-bit JRE versions for various Windows operating systems. See the respective Recommended Browser documentation for your EBS release for details.

Where are the official patch requirements documented?

EBS + Discoverer 11g Users

This JRE release is certified for Discoverer 11g in E-Business Suite environments with the following minimum requirements:

JRE 7 End of Public Updates

The JRE 7u79 release was the last JRE 7 update available to the general public.  Java is an integral part of the Oracle E-Business Suite technology stack, so EBS users will continue to receive Java SE 7 updates to the end of Java SE 7 Premier Support to the end of July 2016.

How can EBS customers obtain Java 7 updates after the public end-of-life?

EBS customers can download Java 7 patches from My Oracle Support.  For a complete list of all Java SE patch numbers, see:

Both JDK and JRE packages are now contained in a single combined download.  Download the "JDK" package for both the desktop client JRE and the server-side JDK package. 

Coexistence of multiple JRE releases Windows desktops

The upgrade to JRE 8 is recommended for EBS users, but some users may need to run older versions of JRE 6 or 7 on their Windows desktops for reasons unrelated to the E-Business Suite.

Most EBS configurations with IE and Firefox use non-static versioning by default. JRE 8 will be invoked instead of earlier JRE releases if both are installed on a Windows desktop. For more details, see "Appendix B: Static vs. Non-static Versioning and Set Up Options" in Notes 290807.1 and 393931.1.

Java Auto-Update Mechanism

With the release of the January 2015 Critical patch Updates, the Java Auto-Update Mechanism will automatically update JRE 7 plug-ins to JRE 8.

Coexistence of multiple JRE releases Windows desktops

The upgrade to JRE 8 is recommended for EBS users, but some users may need to run older versions of JRE 6 or 7 on their Windows desktops for reasons unrelated to the E-Business Suite.

Most EBS configurations with IE and Firefox use non-static versioning by default. JRE 8 will be invoked instead of earlier JRE releases if both are installed on a Windows desktop. For more details, see "Appendix B: Static vs. Non-static Versioning and Set Up Options" in Notes 290807.1 and 393931.1.

What do Mac users need?

Mac users running Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion), 10.8 (Mountain Lion), 10.9 (Mavericks), and 10.10 (Yosemite) can run JRE 7 or 8 plug-ins.  See:

Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JDK 7 for EBS application tier servers?

JRE is used for desktop clients.  JDK is used for application tier servers

JDK upgrades for E-Business Suite application tier servers are highly recommended but currently remain optional while Java 6 is covered by Extended Support. Updates will be delivered via My Oracle Support, where you can continue to receive critical bug fixes and security fixes as well as general maintenance for JDK 6 for application tier servers. 

Java SE 6 is covered by Extended Support until June 2017.  All EBS customers with application tier servers on Windows, Solaris, and Linux must upgrade to JDK 7 by June 2017. EBS customers running their application tier servers on other operating systems should check with their respective vendors for the support dates for those platforms.

JDK 7 is certified with E-Business Suite 12.  See:

Known Issues

When using Internet Explorer, JRE 1.7.0_01 had a delay of around 20 seconds before the applet started to load. This issue is fixed in JRE 1.7.0_95.

References

Related Articles
Categories: APPS Blogs

JRE 1.6.0_121 Certified with Oracle E-Business Suite 12.x

Steven Chan - Wed, 2016-07-20 02:05
Java logThe latest Java Runtime Environment 1.6.0_121 (a.k.a. JRE 6u121-b9) and later updates on the JRE 6 codeline are now certified with Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12.x for Windows-based desktop clients.

All JRE 6, 7, and 8 releases are certified with EBS upon release

Our standard policy is that all E-Business Suite customers can apply all JRE updates to end-user desktops:

  • From JRE 1.6.0_03 and later updates on the JRE 6 codeline
  • From JRE 1.7.0_10 and later updates on the JRE 7 codeline 
  • From JRE 1.8.0_25 and later updates on the JRE 8 codeline
We test all new JRE releases in parallel with the JRE development process, so all new JRE releases are considered certified with the E-Business Suite on the same day that they're released by our Java team. 

You do not need to wait for a certification announcement before applying new JRE 6, 7, or 8 releases to your EBS users' desktops.

Effects of new support dates on Java upgrades for EBS environments

Support dates for the E-Business Suite and Java have changed.  Please review the sections below for more details:

  • What does this mean for Oracle E-Business Suite users?
  • Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JRE 7 for Windows desktop clients?
  • Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JDK 7 for EBS application tier servers?

New EBS installation scripts

This JRE release is the first with a 3-digit Java version. Installing this in your EBS 11i and 12.x environments will require new installation scripts.  See the documentation listed in the 'References' section for more detail.

32-bit and 64-bit versions certified

This certification includes both the 32-bit and 64-bit JRE versions for various Windows operating systems. See the respective Deploying JRE documentation for your EBS release for details.

Implications of Java 6 End of Public Updates for EBS Users

The Support Roadmap for Oracle Java is published here:

The latest updates to that page (as of Sept. 19, 2012) state:

Java SE 6 End of Public Updates Notice

After February 2013, Oracle will no longer post updates of Java SE 6 to its public download sites. Existing Java SE 6 downloads already posted as of February 2013 will remain accessible in the Java Archive on Oracle Technology Network. Developers and end-users are encouraged to update to more recent Java SE versions that remain available for public download. For enterprise customers, who need continued access to critical bug fixes and security fixes as well as general maintenance for Java SE 6 or older versions, long term support is available through Oracle Java SE Support .

What does this mean for Oracle E-Business Suite users?

EBS users fall under the category of "enterprise users" above.  Java is an integral part of the Oracle E-Business Suite technology stack, so EBS users will continue to receive Java SE 6 updates from February 2013 to the end of Java SE 6 Extended Support in June 2017.

In other words, nothing changes for EBS users after February 2013. 

EBS users will continue to receive critical bug fixes and security fixes as well as general maintenance for Java SE 6 until the end of Java SE 6 Extended Support in June 2017. 

How can EBS customers obtain Java 6 updates after the public end-of-life?

Java 6 is now available only via My Oracle Support for E-Business Suite users.  You can find links to this release, including Release Notes, documentation, and the actual Java downloads here: Both JDK and JRE packages are contained in a single combined download after 6u45.  Download the "JDK" package for both the desktop client JRE and the server-side JDK package.

Coexistence of multiple JRE releases Windows desktops

The upgrade to JRE 8 is recommended for EBS users, but some users may need to run older versions of JRE 6 or 7 on their Windows desktops for reasons unrelated to the E-Business Suite.

Most EBS configurations with IE and Firefox use non-static versioning by default. JRE 8 will be invoked instead of earlier JRE releases if both are installed on a Windows desktop. For more details, see "Appendix B: Static vs. Non-static Versioning and Set Up Options" in Notes 290807.1 and 393931.1.

What do Mac users need?

Mac users running Mac OS X 10.10 (Yosemite) can run JRE 7 or 8 plug-ins.  See:

Will EBS users be forced to upgrade to JDK 7 for EBS application tier servers?

JRE is used for desktop clients.  JDK is used for application tier servers

JDK upgrades for E-Business Suite application tier servers are highly recommended but currently remain optional while Java 6 is covered by Extended Support. Updates will be delivered via My Oracle Support, where you can continue to receive critical bug fixes and security fixes as well as general maintenance for JDK 6 for application tier servers. 

Java SE 6 is covered by Extended Support until June 2017.  All EBS customers with application tier servers on Windows, Solaris, and Linux must upgrade to JDK 7 by June 2017. EBS customers running their application tier servers on other operating systems should check with their respective vendors for the support dates for those platforms.

JDK 7 is certified with E-Business Suite 12.  See:

References

Related Articles

Categories: APPS Blogs

12.1.0.2 New Features

Michael Dinh - Tue, 2016-07-19 21:51

Just a quick note as I play with CDB/PDB.

No more triggers!

PDB State Management Across CDB

select con_name, instance_name, state from DBA_PDB_SAVED_STATES;
alter pluggable database PDB1 SAVE STATE;
alter pluggable database ALL SAVE STATE;
alter pluggable database ALL DISCARD STATE;
alter pluggable database ALL OPEN;

startup force mount exclusive restrict;
drop database;

Drop database still does not clean up ADR.

[19:32]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/sqlplus/admin
$ sysdba

SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.2.0 Production on Tue Jul 19 19:32:38 2016

Copyright (c) 1982, 2014, Oracle.  All rights reserved.


Connected to:
Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> show con_name

CON_NAME
------------------------------
CDB$ROOT
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 PDB1                           READ WRITE NO
         4 PDB2                           MOUNTED
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> select con_name, instance_name, state from DBA_PDB_SAVED_STATES;

no rows selected

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> alter pluggable database all open;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 PDB1                           READ WRITE NO
         4 PDB2                           READ WRITE NO
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> alter pluggable database all SAVE state;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> select con_name, instance_name, state from DBA_PDB_SAVED_STATES;

CON_NAME INSTANCE_NAME STATE
-------- ------------- --------------
PDB2     cdb12c        OPEN
PDB1     cdb12c        OPEN

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> startup force;
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 1073741824 bytes
Fixed Size                  2932632 bytes
Variable Size             713031784 bytes
Database Buffers          352321536 bytes
Redo Buffers                5455872 bytes
Database mounted.
Database opened.
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 PDB1                           READ WRITE NO
         4 PDB2                           READ WRITE NO
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> alter pluggable database all DISCARD state;

Pluggable database altered.

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> select con_name, instance_name, state from DBA_PDB_SAVED_STATES;

no rows selected

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> startup force;
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 1073741824 bytes
Fixed Size                  2932632 bytes
Variable Size             713031784 bytes
Database Buffers          352321536 bytes
Redo Buffers                5455872 bytes
Database mounted.
Database opened.
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 PDB1                           MOUNTED
         4 PDB2                           MOUNTED
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> startup force mount exclusive restrict;
ORACLE instance started.

Total System Global Area 1073741824 bytes
Fixed Size                  2932632 bytes
Variable Size             713031784 bytes
Database Buffers          352321536 bytes
Redo Buffers                5455872 bytes
Database mounted.
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> !ls /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
cr_cdb.sql  hc_cdb12c.dat  hc_tmnt.dat  inittmnt.ora  lkCDB12C  lkTMNT_A  orapwcdb12c  orapwtmnt  spfilecdb12c.ora  spfiletmnt.ora

CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> drop database;

Database dropped.

Disconnected from Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY>
CDB$ROOT:(SYS@cdb12c):PRIMARY> exit
[19:39]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/sqlplus/admin
$ ps -ef|grep pmon
oracle    7151     1  0 13:04 ?        00:00:01 ora_pmon_tmnt
oracle   16898  5756  0 19:39 pts/1    00:00:00 grep pmon
[19:39]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/sqlplus/admin
$ ls /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
cr_cdb.sql  hc_cdb12c.dat  hc_tmnt.dat  inittmnt.ora  lkCDB12C  lkTMNT_A  orapwcdb12c  orapwtmnt  spfiletmnt.ora
[19:39]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/sqlplus/admin
$ ls /u01/app/oracle/diag/rdbms/
cdb12c  tmnt_a
[19:40]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/sqlplus/admin
$

Notes on vendor lock-in

Curt Monash - Tue, 2016-07-19 20:35

Vendor lock-in is an important subject. Everybody knows that. But few of us realize just how complicated the subject is, nor how riddled it is with paradoxes. Truth be told, I wasn’t fully aware either. But when I set out to write this post, I found that it just kept growing longer.

1. The most basic form of lock-in is:

  • You do application development for a target set of platform technologies.
  • Your applications can’t run without those platforms underneath.
  • Hence, you’re locked into those platforms.

2. Enterprise vendor standardization is closely associated with lock-in. The basic idea is that you have a mandate or strong bias toward having different apps run over the same platforms, because:

  • That simplifies your environment, requiring less integration and interoperability.
  • That simplifies your staffing; the same skill sets apply to multiple needs and projects.
  • That simplifies your vendor support relationships; there’s “one throat to choke”.
  • That simplifies your price negotiation.

3. That last point is double-edged; you have more power over suppliers to whom you give more business, but they also have more power over you. The upshot is often an ELA (Enterprise License Agreement), which commonly works:

  • For a fixed period of time, the enterprise may use as much of a given product set as they want, with costs fixed in advance.
  • A few years later, the price is negotiated, based on current levels of usage.

Thus, doing an additional project using ELAed products may appear low-cost.

  • Incremental license and maintenance fees may be zero in the short-term.
  • Incremental personnel costs may be controlled because the needed skills are already in-house.

Often those appearances are substantially correct. That’s a big reason why incumbent software is difficult to supplant unless the upstart substitute is superior in fundamental and important ways.

4. Subscriptions are closely associated with lock-in.

  • Most obviously, the traditional software industry gets its profits from high-margin support/maintenance services.
  • Cloud lock-in has rapidly become a big deal.
  • The open source vendors meeting lock-in resistance, noted above, have subscription business models.

Much of why customers care about lock-in is the subscription costs it’s likely to commit them to.

5. Also related to lock-in are thick single-vendor technology stacks. If you run Oracle applications, you’re going to run the Oracle DBMS too. And if you run that, you’re likely to run other Oracle software, and perhaps use Exadata hardware as well. The cloud ==> lock-in truism is an example of this point as well.

6. There’s a lot of truth to the generality that central IT cares about overall technology architecture, while line-of-business departments just want to get the job done. This causes departments to both:

  • Oppose standardization.
  • Like thick technology stacks.

Thus, departmental influence on IT both encourages and discourages lock-in.

7. IBM is all about lock-in. IBM’s support for Linux, Eclipse and so on don’t really contradict that. IBM’s business models is to squeeze serve its still-large number of strongly loyal customers as well as it can.

8. Microsoft’s business model over the decades has also greatly depended on lock-in.

  • Indeed, it exploited Windows/Office lock-in so vigorously as to incur substantial anti-trust difficulties.
  • Server-side Windows tends to be involved in thick stacks — DBMS, middleware, business intelligence, SharePoint and more. Many customers (smaller enterprises or in some cases departments) are firmly locked into these stacks.
  • Microsoft is making a strong cloud push with Azure, which inherently involves lock-in.

Yet sometimes, Microsoft is more free and open.

  • Office for Macintosh allowed the Mac to be a viable Windows competitor. (And Microsoft was well-paid for that, generating comparable revenue for per Mac to what it got for each Windows PC.)
  • Visual Studio is useful for writing apps to run against multiple DBMS.
  • Just recently, Microsoft SQL Server was ported to Linux.

9. SAP applications run over several different DBMS, including its own cheap MaxDB. That counteracts potential DBMS lock-in. But some of its newer apps are HANA-specific. That, of course, has the opposite effect.

10. And with that as background, we can finally get what led me to finally write this post. Multiple clients have complaints that may be paraphrased as:

  • Customers are locked into expensive traditional DBMS such as Oracle.
  • Yet they’re so afraid of lock-in now that they don’t want to pay for our vendor-supplied versions of open source database technologies; they prefer to roll their own.
  • Further confusing matters, they also are happy to use cloud technologies, including the associated database technologies (e.g. . Redshift or other Amazon offerings), creating whole new stacks of lock-in.

So open source vendors of NoSQL data managers and similar technologies felt like they were the only kind of vendor suffering from fear of lock-in.

I agree with them that enterprises who feel this way are getting it wrong. Indeed:

This is the value proposition that propelled Cloudera. It’s also a strong reason to give money to whichever MongoDB, DataStax, Neo Technology et al. sponsors open source technology that you use.

General disclosure: My fingerprints have been on this industry strategy since before the term “NoSQL” was coined. It’s been an aspect of many different consulting relationships.

Some enterprises push back, logically or emotionally as the case may be, by observing that the best internet companies — e.g., Facebook — are allergic to paying for software, even open source. My refutations of that argument include:

  • Facebook has more and better engineers than you do.
  • Facebook has a lot more servers than you do, and would presumably face much higher prices than you would if you each chose to forgo the in-house alternative.
  • Facebook pays for open source software in a different way than through subscription fees — it invents and enhances it. Multiple important projects have originated at Facebook, and it contributes to many others. Are you in a position to do the same thing?

And finally — most of Facebook’s users get its service for free. (Advertisers are the ones who pay cash; all others just pay in attention to the ads.) So if getting its software for free actually does screw up its SLAs (Service Level Agreements) — well, free generally comes with poorer SLAs than paid. But if you’re in the business of serving paying customers, then you might want to have paying-customer kinds of SLAs, even on the parts of your technology — e.g. websites urging people to do business with you — that you provide for free yourself.

Related links

Notes on vendor lock-in

DBMS2 - Tue, 2016-07-19 20:35

Vendor lock-in is an important subject. Everybody knows that. But few of us realize just how complicated the subject is, nor how riddled it is with paradoxes. Truth be told, I wasn’t fully aware either. But when I set out to write this post, I found that it just kept growing longer.

1. The most basic form of lock-in is:

  • You do application development for a target set of platform technologies.
  • Your applications can’t run without those platforms underneath.
  • Hence, you’re locked into those platforms.

2. Enterprise vendor standardization is closely associated with lock-in. The basic idea is that you have a mandate or strong bias toward having different apps run over the same platforms, because:

  • That simplifies your environment, requiring less integration and interoperability.
  • That simplifies your staffing; the same skill sets apply to multiple needs and projects.
  • That simplifies your vendor support relationships; there’s “one throat to choke”.
  • That simplifies your price negotiation.

3. That last point is double-edged; you have more power over suppliers to whom you give more business, but they also have more power over you. The upshot is often an ELA (Enterprise License Agreement), which commonly works:

  • For a fixed period of time, the enterprise may use as much of a given product set as they want, with costs fixed in advance.
  • A few years later, the price is negotiated, based on current levels of usage.

Thus, doing an additional project using ELAed products may appear low-cost.

  • Incremental license and maintenance fees may be zero in the short-term.
  • Incremental personnel costs may be controlled because the needed skills are already in-house.

Often those appearances are substantially correct. That’s a big reason why incumbent software is difficult to supplant unless the upstart substitute is superior in fundamental and important ways.

4. Subscriptions are closely associated with lock-in.

  • Most obviously, the traditional software industry gets its profits from high-margin support/maintenance services.
  • Cloud lock-in has rapidly become a big deal.
  • The open source vendors meeting lock-in resistance, noted above, have subscription business models.

Much of why customers care about lock-in is the subscription costs it’s likely to commit them to.

5. Also related to lock-in are thick single-vendor technology stacks. If you run Oracle applications, you’re going to run the Oracle DBMS too. And if you run that, you’re likely to run other Oracle software, and perhaps use Exadata hardware as well. The cloud ==> lock-in truism is an example of this point as well.

6. There’s a lot of truth to the generality that central IT cares about overall technology architecture, while line-of-business departments just want to get the job done. This causes departments to both:

  • Oppose standardization.
  • Like thick technology stacks.

Thus, departmental influence on IT both encourages and discourages lock-in.

7. IBM is all about lock-in. IBM’s support for Linux, Eclipse and so on don’t really contradict that. IBM’s business models is to squeeze serve its still-large number of strongly loyal customers as well as it can.

8. Microsoft’s business model over the decades has also greatly depended on lock-in.

  • Indeed, it exploited Windows/Office lock-in so vigorously as to incur substantial anti-trust difficulties.
  • Server-side Windows tends to be involved in thick stacks — DBMS, middleware, business intelligence, SharePoint and more. Many customers (smaller enterprises or in some cases departments) are firmly locked into these stacks.
  • Microsoft is making a strong cloud push with Azure, which inherently involves lock-in.

Yet sometimes, Microsoft is more free and open.

  • Office for Macintosh allowed the Mac to be a viable Windows competitor. (And Microsoft was well-paid for that, generating comparable revenue for per Mac to what it got for each Windows PC.)
  • Visual Studio is useful for writing apps to run against multiple DBMS.
  • Just recently, Microsoft SQL Server was ported to Linux.

9. SAP applications run over several different DBMS, including its own cheap MaxDB. That counteracts potential DBMS lock-in. But some of its newer apps are HANA-specific. That, of course, has the opposite effect.

10. And with that as background, we can finally get what led me to finally write this post. Multiple clients have complaints that may be paraphrased as:

  • Customers are locked into expensive traditional DBMS such as Oracle.
  • Yet they’re so afraid of lock-in now that they don’t want to pay for our vendor-supplied versions of open source database technologies; they prefer to roll their own.
  • Further confusing matters, they also are happy to use cloud technologies, including the associated database technologies (e.g. . Redshift or other Amazon offerings), creating whole new stacks of lock-in.

So open source vendors of NoSQL data managers and similar technologies felt like they were the only kind of vendor suffering from fear of lock-in.

I agree with them that enterprises who feel this way are getting it wrong. Indeed:

This is the value proposition that propelled Cloudera. It’s also a strong reason to give money to whichever MongoDB, DataStax, Neo Technology et al. sponsors open source technology that you use.

General disclosure: My fingerprints have been on this industry strategy since before the term “NoSQL” was coined. It’s been an aspect of many different consulting relationships.

Some enterprises push back, logically or emotionally as the case may be, by observing that the best internet companies — e.g., Facebook — are allergic to paying for software, even open source. My refutations of that argument include:

  • Facebook has more and better engineers than you do.
  • Facebook has a lot more servers than you do, and would presumably face much higher prices than you would if you each chose to forgo the in-house alternative.
  • Facebook pays for open source software in a different way than through subscription fees — it invents and enhances it. Multiple important projects have originated at Facebook, and it contributes to many others. Are you in a position to do the same thing?

And finally — most of Facebook’s users get its service for free. (Advertisers are the ones who pay cash; all others just pay in attention to the ads.) So if getting its software for free actually does screw up its SLAs (Service Level Agreements) — well, free generally comes with poorer SLAs than paid. But if you’re in the business of serving paying customers, then you might want to have paying-customer kinds of SLAs, even on the parts of your technology — e.g. websites urging people to do business with you — that you provide for free yourself.

Related links

Categories: Other

Notes from a long trip, July 19, 2016

DBMS2 - Tue, 2016-07-19 20:34

For starters:

  • I spent three weeks in California on a hybrid personal/business trip. I had a bunch of meetings, but not three weeks’ worth.
  • The timing was awkward for most companies I wanted to see. No blame accrues to those who didn’t make themselves available.
  • I came back with a nasty cough. Follow-up phone calls aren’t an option until next week.
  • I’m impatient to start writing. Hence tonight’s posts. But it’s difficult for a man and his cough to be productive at the same time.

A running list of recent posts is:

  • As a companion to this post, I’m publishing a very long one on vendor lock-in.

Subjects I’d like to add to that list include:

  • Spark (it’s prospering).
  • Databricks (ditto, appearances to the contrary notwithstanding).
  • Flink (it’s interesting as the streaming technology it’s now positioned to be, rather than the overall Spark alternative it used to be positioned as but which the world didn’t need).
  • DataStax, MemSQL, Zoomdata, and Neo Technology (also prospering).
  • Cloudera (multiple topics, as usual).
  • Analytic SQL engines (“traditional” analytic RDBMS aren’t doing well).
  • Enterprises’ inconsistent views about vendor lock-in.
  • Microsoft’s reinvention (it feels real).
  • Metadata (it’s ever more of a thing).
  • Machine learning (it’s going to be a big portion of my research going forward).
  • Transitions to the cloud — this subject affects almost everything else.

I’ll edit these lists as appropriate when further posts go up.

Let’s cover some other subjects right here.

1. While Kafka is widely agreed to be the universal delivery mechanism for streams, the landscape for companion technologies is confused.

  • Back in January I wrote that the leaders were mainly Spark Streaming, followed by Storm.
  • I overlooked the fact that Storm creator Twitter was replacing Storm with something called Heron.*
  • If there’s any buzz about Confluent’s replacement for distant-third-place contender Samza, I missed it.
  • Opinions about Spark Streaming are mixed. Some folks want to get away from it; others like it just fine.

And of course Flink is hoping to blow everybody else in the space away.

*But that kind of thing is not necessarily a death knell. Cassandra inventor Facebook soon replaced Cassandra with HBase, yet Cassandra is doing just fine.

As for the “lambda architecture” — that has always felt like a kludge, and various outfits are trying to obsolete it in various ways. As just one example, Cloudera described that to me during my visit as one of the main points of Kudu.

2. The idea that NoSQL does away with DBAs (DataBase Administrators) is common. It also turns out to be wrong. DBAs basically do two things.

  • Handle the database design part of application development. In NoSQL environments, this part of the job is indeed largely refactored away. More precisely, it is integrated into the general app developer/architect role.
  • Manage production databases. This part of the DBA job is, if anything, a bigger deal in the NoSQL world than in more mature and automated relational environments. It’s likely to be called part of “devops” rather than “DBA”, but by whatever name it’s very much a thing.

I had a moment of clarity on this point while visiting my clients at DataStax, and discussing their goal — shared by numerous companies — of being properly appreciated for the management tools they provide. In the room with me were CEO Billy Bosworth and chief evangelist Patrick McFadin — both of whom are former DBAs themselves.

3. I visited ClearStory, and Sharmila Mulligan showed me her actual sales database, as well as telling me some things about funding. The details are all confidential, but ClearStory is clearly doing better than rumor might suggest.

4. Platfora insisted on meeting circumstances in which it was inconvenient for me to take notes. So I have no details to share. But they sounded happy.

5. Pneubotics — with a cool new video on its home page — has found its first excellent product/market fit. Traditional heavy metallic robots are great at painting and related tasks when they can remain stationary, or move on rigid metal rails. Neither of those options works well, however, for large curved or irregular surfaces as might be found in the aerospace industry. Customer success for the leading soft robot company has ensued.

This all seems pretty close to the inspection/maintenance/repair area that I previously suggested could be a good soft robotics fit.

Categories: Other

Create 12c CDB using dbca or sqlplus ???

Michael Dinh - Tue, 2016-07-19 17:27

How do you typically create database, using dbca or sqlplus?

I am still surprised with all the bloatware added for creating database using dbca.

Also, is there a reason to prefix PDB with pdb?

[14:54]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ ll
total 28
-rw-r--r--. 1 oracle oinstall  801 Jul 19 12:59 cr_cdb.sql
-rw-rw----. 1 oracle oinstall 1544 Jul 19 13:06 hc_tmnt.dat
-rw-r--r--. 1 oracle oinstall  216 Jul 19 12:48 inittmnt.ora
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall   24 Jul 19 13:05 lkTMNT_A
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 5120 Jul 19 11:13 orapwtmnt
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 2560 Jul 19 13:36 spfiletmnt.ora

[14:54]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ cat /etc/oratab
grid:/u01/app/12.1.0.2/grid
tmnt:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1

[14:54]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ dbca -silent \
> -createDatabase -templateName General_Purpose.dbc -createAsContainerDatabase true \
> -gdbName cdb12c -sid cdb12c \
> -SysPassword oracle -SystemPassword oracle \
> -numberOfPdbs 2 -pdbName pdb \
> -pdbadminUsername pdba -pdbadminPassword oracle \
> -emConfiguration NONE \
> -redoLogFileSize 100 \
> -storageType FS -datafileDestination /oradata \
> -characterSet AL32UTF8 -nationalCharacterSet AL16UTF16 \
> -totalMemory 1024 -databaseType MULTIPURPOSE \
> -initparams audit_trail=NONE

Registering database with Oracle Restart
4% complete
Copying database files
5% complete
6% complete
12% complete
17% complete
22% complete
30% complete
Creating and starting Oracle instance
32% complete
35% complete
36% complete
37% complete
41% complete
44% complete
45% complete
48% complete
Completing Database Creation
50% complete
53% complete
55% complete
63% complete
71% complete
74% complete
Creating Pluggable Databases
79% complete
84% complete
100% complete
Look at the log file "/u01/app/oracle/cfgtoollogs/dbca/cdb12c/cdb12c.log" for further details.

[15:11]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ ll
total 48
-rw-r--r--. 1 oracle oinstall  801 Jul 19 12:59 cr_cdb.sql
-rw-rw----. 1 oracle oinstall 1544 Jul 19 15:10 hc_cdb12c.dat
-rw-rw----. 1 oracle oinstall 1544 Jul 19 13:06 hc_tmnt.dat
-rw-r--r--. 1 oracle oinstall  216 Jul 19 12:48 inittmnt.ora
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall   24 Jul 19 14:56 lkCDB12C
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall   24 Jul 19 13:05 lkTMNT_A
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 7680 Jul 19 15:07 orapwcdb12c
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 5120 Jul 19 11:13 orapwtmnt
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 3584 Jul 19 15:11 spfilecdb12c.ora
-rw-r-----. 1 oracle oinstall 2560 Jul 19 13:36 spfiletmnt.ora

[15:12]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ cat /etc/oratab
#Backup file is  /u01/app/12.1.0.2/grid/srvm/admin/oratab.bak.arrow line added by Agent
grid:/u01/app/12.1.0.2/grid
tmnt:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1
cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1:N          # line added by Agent

[15:12]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ sqlplus / as sysdba
SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.2.0 Production on Tue Jul 19 15:12:33 2016
Copyright (c) 1982, 2014, Oracle.  All rights reserved.
Connected to:
Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options

SQL> show con_name

CON_NAME
------------------------------
CDB$ROOT
SQL> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 PDB1                           READ WRITE NO
         4 PDB2                           READ WRITE NO
SQL> @/media/sf_working/sql/dba_registry.sql

NAME      COMP_ID      COMP_NAME                                VERSION                        STATUS
--------- ------------ ---------------------------------------- ------------------------------ --------------------------------------------
CDB12C    DV           Oracle Database Vault                    12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    APEX         Oracle Application Express               4.2.5.00.08                    VALID
CDB12C    OLS          Oracle Label Security                    12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    SDO          Spatial                                  12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    ORDIM        Oracle Multimedia                        12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    CONTEXT      Oracle Text                              12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    OWM          Oracle Workspace Manager                 12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    XDB          Oracle XML Database                      12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    CATALOG      Oracle Database Catalog Views            12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    CATPROC      Oracle Database Packages and Types       12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    JAVAVM       JServer JAVA Virtual Machine             12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    XML          Oracle XDK                               12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    CATJAVA      Oracle Database Java Packages            12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    APS          OLAP Analytic Workspace                  12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    XOQ          Oracle OLAP API                          12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
CDB12C    RAC          Oracle Real Application Clusters         12.1.0.2.0                     OPTION OFF

16 rows selected.

SQL> exit
Disconnected from Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options
Manually created CDB.
[15:14]oracle@arrow:cdb12c:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$ . oraenv <<< tmnt ORACLE_SID = [cdb12c] ? The Oracle base remains unchanged with value /u01/app/oracle 

[15:14]oracle@arrow:tmnt:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs 
$ sqlplus / as sysdba SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.2.0 Production on Tue Jul 19 15:14:10 2016 
Copyright (c) 1982, 2014, Oracle. All rights reserved. 
Connected to: 
Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production 
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options SQL> show con_name

CON_NAME
------------------------------
CDB$ROOT
SQL> show pdbs

    CON_ID CON_NAME                       OPEN MODE  RESTRICTED
---------- ------------------------------ ---------- ----------
         2 PDB$SEED                       READ ONLY  NO
         3 APRIL                          MOUNTED
SQL> @/media/sf_working/sql/dba_registry.sql

NAME      COMP_ID      COMP_NAME                                VERSION                        STATUS
--------- ------------ ---------------------------------------- ------------------------------ --------------------------------------------
TMNT      XDB          Oracle XML Database                      12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
TMNT      CATALOG      Oracle Database Catalog Views            12.1.0.2.0                     VALID
TMNT      CATPROC      Oracle Database Packages and Types       12.1.0.2.0                     VALID

SQL> exit
Disconnected from Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options
[15:14]oracle@arrow:tmnt:/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1/dbs
$

Extending Oracle SaaS with Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service - Simplified PaaS for SaaS

Shay Shmeltzer - Tue, 2016-07-19 16:18

One of the focus area for us when developing the new Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service (ABCS) was to create a tool that would make it very simple to enrich Oracle SaaS applications.

This integration is a key part of Oracle's PaaS for SaaS offering - where we have unique capabilities in our Platform as a Service offering for our Software as a Service customers.

With ABCS it is very easy to pick up objects from Oracle SaaS (through the built in service catalog) and then design new web and mobile interfaces that show data from those.

In addition you can then add your own custom fields and related objects with additional data you want to track.

Once your application is complete - you can then either run it as a stand-alone app, or embed it into an Oracle SaaS interface. 

I wrote two blogs and recorded two videos that show you the basics.

Creating Oracle ABCS application connected to Oracle SaaS

Embedding Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service Apps in Oracle Sales Cloud

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These videos are part of the new Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service YouTube Channel

And the blogs are published on the Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service OTN Community

We have more tutorials there to help you go even further - so check them out! 

Categories: Development

July 2016 Critical Patch Update Released

Oracle Security Team - Tue, 2016-07-19 14:51

Oracle today released the July 2016 Critical Patch Update.

This Critical Patch Update provides fixes for a wide range of product families including: Oracle Database Server, Oracle E-Business Suite, Oracle Industry Applications, Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Sun Products, Oracle Java SE, and Oracle MySQL.

Oracle recommends this Critical Patch Update be applied as soon as possible. A summary and analysis of this Critical Patch Update has been published on My Oracle Support (MOS Note 2161607.1)

For More Information:

The Critical Patch Update Advisory is located at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/security-advisory/cpujul2016-2881720.html

My Oracle Support Note 2161607.1 is located at https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&id=2161607.1 (MOS account required).

Critical Patch Update for July 2016 Now Available

Steven Chan - Tue, 2016-07-19 14:45

The Critical Patch Update (CPU) for July 2016 was released on July 19, 2016. Oracle strongly recommends applying the patches as soon as possible.

The Critical Patch Update Advisory is the starting point for relevant information. It includes a list of products affected, pointers to obtain the patches, a summary of the security vulnerabilities, and links to other important documents.

Supported products that are not listed in the "Supported Products and Components Affected" Section of the advisory do not require new patches to be applied.

The Critical Patch Update Advisory is available at the following location:

It is essential to review the Critical Patch Update supporting documentation referenced in the Advisory before applying patches.

The next four Critical Patch Update release dates are:

  • October 18, 2016
  • January 17, 2017
  • April 18, 2017
  • July 18, 2017
References Related Articles

Categories: APPS Blogs

The DBA Best Practices Series Part 3- Reducing Organizational Risk

Chris Foot - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:55

We learned in previous articles that it takes more than just being a great technician to keep your customers happy.  The theme of this series is that if you want to be viewed as a strategic resource in your organization, being a technical expert isn’t enough.  Because of the trade you have chosen, the DBA position provides you with an excellent opportunity to play a more strategic role in your organization.

Mapping columns from two tables ,if match replace with another string

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
Hi Tom, I have a question?could you assist regarding this issue? 1. I have two tables are order table and product table. 2. order table containing two columns are order test and order app.the column data format is order test ...
Categories: DBA Blogs

SQL Injections

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
Hi Tom, 1)What is the sql injection,And how to solve sql injection problems with an example program tom?
Categories: DBA Blogs

Tom Kyte's books

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
Hi Tom, I have some of your fine Oracle books. Effective Oracle by design and Expert Oracle Database Architecture (latest version). I prefer reading on an ipad rather than carrying them around with me. Is there a PDF version of these books? Do ...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Converting Row to Column and Vice-versa

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
Hi Tom, I have a table Assigned_Task. ENAME JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL ------ -------- -------- ------ ------ RASHMI 20 25 30 05 SOUMYA 11 21 09 15 BISWA 17 33 19 00 I want the output as below format: M...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Unique value in Oracle Collection variable

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
Hi team, I have one doubt on oracle collection while implementing on Scenario in my assignment. We need to have collection variable column (vARRAYS) inside a Table , Sample table structure looks like below id name list 1 ABC varra...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Alternatives for to_char(dt, 'DAY')

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2016-07-19 13:46
--->A simple SQL issue that I faced few days back. We normally perform some executions on weekends(SATURDAY or SUNDAY) like some sort of cleaning activity,stats gathering,partition creation etc. Please take caution If your are planning to achieve ...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Links for 2016-07-18 [del.icio.us]

Categories: DBA Blogs

The New Ask Tom

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2016-07-18 19:26
Why do parts of the new Ask Tom appear in another language? e.g. on the list of questions asked previously: Kedd Februar 18, 2003 (H. Feb 17, 2003, 0 days old) Thanks.
Categories: DBA Blogs

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