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We Need a More Robust Learning Sciences Research Community

Michael Feldstein - Mon, 2016-04-11 17:00

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1069)

My latest Chronicle column is on how inherently difficult it is to evaluate learning science claims, particularly when they get boiled down to marketing claims about product efficacy, and how deep academic distrust of vendors makes this already incredibly difficult challenge nearly impossible.

Here’s where I stand on vendor participation in ed tech and learning science research:

On the one hand, vendors have access to data and resources that, for a variety of reasons, are difficult or even impossible for universities to access. They sometimes have millions of students using their products and relatively few internal barriers to doing certain kinds of large-scale effectiveness research (although to a certain degree, territoriality, bureaucracy, and poorly designed data architectures are universal problems). On the other hand, vendors should not under any circumstances be allowed to define the research agenda and arbitrate the validity of learning sciences claims for all of education. Theoretically, there is a simple solution to this. Higher ed knows how to do science. It knows how to review scientific claims. Vendor research should be put through the peer review process. They should publish enough information that their results can be evaluated and, when feasible, duplicated. Their reputations should be based in part on who is doing (or, at least, properly using) good scientific research. After all, most of the researchers at these companies are PhDs who are trained in the academic research process. There is no reason in the world why these companies can’t contribute to real, rigorous, peer-reviewed dialog and progress in the field.

Unfortunately, the current state of the learning sciences research community is weak and fragmented. There is incredibly good work going on in pockets here and there, but overall, it’s a mess. This is bad for many reasons. It both lets vendors get away with junk science claims while failing to reward good behavior. Worse, it effectively abdicates the central role that academia should be playing in driving the research agenda.

Snake-Oil

The post We Need a More Robust Learning Sciences Research Community appeared first on e-Literate.

May 4: Macy’s―Oracle HCM Cloud Customer Forum

Linda Fishman Hoyle - Mon, 2016-04-11 16:29

Join us for an Oracle HCM Cloud Customer Forum call on Wednesday, May 4, 2016. Terri Brown, VP Business Processes and Solutions at Macy’s, will talk about how the company is in the process of changing the way it manages its people. Macy's is executing on a transformational campaign internally called “HR Reinvent.” A huge part of this transformation has to do with all things human resources. 

To attract and retain the right talent with help from Oracle, Macy’s plans to go live on Oracle HCM Cloud, including Core HR, Benefits, Payroll, Recruiting, Onboarding, Social Sourcing, Goals, Performance, Talent Review and Succession, Compensation, and Learn by 2017 for all of its 185,000 employees.

Register now to attend the live Forum on Wednesday, May 04, 2016, at 9:00 a.m. PT and learn more about Macy’s experience and plans with Oracle HCM Cloud.

Historical Survey Of Competency-Based Education

Michael Feldstein - Mon, 2016-04-11 15:04

By Phil HillMore Posts (401)

I have previously written a primer on competency-based education (CBE) using SPT Malan’s seminal article as the basis for understanding the key elements. Chris Mallett, formerly associate provost at Western Governors University (WGU) and currently VP for online programs at Northeastern University, has just posted a broader historical survey on CBE that is well worth reading. His extensive first-hand knowledge of the development of CBE in higher ed adds another reason to read the article.

In “What’s old is new again . . . a CBE long read”, Chris traces the origins of CBE back further than does Malan.

The earliest American competency-based education initiatives are said to have emerged through the development of the training programs used to quickly prepare soldiers, airmen, and others who were needed in support of the nation’s efforts in World Word II (Joyce, 1971). The ability to deliver “precise and rapid training which considered the learner chiefly in terms of his capacity to respond to the training” was of paramount concern at the time (Joyce, 1971, p. 21). According to Gagne (as cited in Joyce, 1971), training programs deployed for these purposes were developed in four phases:

1. Program goals were identified with particular emphasis on behavioral elements and competencies to be achieved.

2. Behavioral elements and competencies were organized into coherent units.

3. Training exercises that aligned with desired behaviors and competencies were developed.

4. An evaluation system to assess acquisition of the desired behaviors and competencies was developed. Feedback from the system was provided to trainees and their instructors.

As seen in this excerpt, the article provides useful summaries of key concepts to help readers understand what CBE is and what it isn’t. Jumping ahead to the 1980s we get to a point that is crucial to understand – the focus on adult learners.

Early 1980s competency-based education programs used development methods and service practices similar to those used by the competency-based practitioners of the 1960s and 1970s. According to Kasworm (1980), the programs identified specific learning outcomes and used both pre- and post-assessment instruments to determine if competencies had been achieved and mastered. Course content, instructional strategies, and processes all varied by program and were deployed consistent with the needs of students. Most programs employed an adult-learner orientation and aspired to achieve the certification of mastery, not just minimal competence (1980).

All of the programs studied by Kasworm were designed with the realities of adult learners in mind and centered on prescribed objectives and outcomes (i.e., the competencies). Most offered flexibility of time and participation so that “students may begin their learning at any time, progress in their learning of competencies at their own pace, and have opportunities to return to inadequately learned concepts of skills until mastery (Kasworm, 1980, p. 19). Many programs offered personalized instruction. Pre-assessments were often used to diagnose skills and knowledge gaps. Post-learning assessment instruments provided for the certification of mastery. Most programs allowed for variable instruction, allowing students to select learning resources and experiences that would best meet their specific needs. Some competency-based education programs provided advisement or counseling. Some featured established competencies with an aligned, standard curriculum. Others directed students to curricular resources but left it to the learner to choose an appropriate path on his or her own (Kasworm, 1980).

Given the wide range of programs trying some flavor of CBE in the past few years, it is useful to see acknowledgement of the diversity of approaches.

The competency-based education practices Klein-Collins (2012) examined varied dramatically by institution. Some institutions emphasized competencies within traditional, instructor-led, credit-hour based systems. Klein-Collins described these institutions as offering “competency-focused programs” (2012, p. 31) in that leaders had applied a competencies framework to their existing, credit hour-based programs. Other institutions, she said, used “purely competency-based programs” (2012, p. 31) in lieu of traditional systems, creating efficiencies, learning flexibility, and economic advantages in the process. Among the latter group, institutions Klein-Collins examined all relied on the use assessments to verify students’ competencies and awarded credits and credentials strictly according to students’ performance with such instruments (2012).

Chris indicates that there will be future posts on the subject. I hope that he addresses two in particular:

  • What are the limits of CBE, or under what conditions should CBE be attempted?
  • What are examples of assignments and assessments within CBE programs that go beyond simple quizzes and multiple-choice assessments?

For those interested in CBE, go read the full article.

The post Historical Survey Of Competency-Based Education appeared first on e-Literate.

SQL On The Edge #9 – Azure SQL Database Threat Detection

Pythian Group - Mon, 2016-04-11 14:30

Despite being well documented for several years now, every now and then we still run into clients that have bad experiences because of SQL injection attacks. If you’re not familiar, a SQL injection attack happens when an attacker exploits an application vulnerability in how they pass queries and data into the database and insert their own malicious SQL code to be executed. If you want to see different examples and get the full details, the Wikipedia page is very comprehensive.

Depending on how the application is configured, this kind of attack can go all the way from enabling attackers to see data they shouldn’t, to dropping an entire database if your application is allowed to do so. The fact that it’s an application based vulnerability also means that it really depends on proper coding and testing of all inputs in the application to prevent it. In other words, it can be very time-consuming to go back and plug all the holes if the application wasn’t securely built from the ground up.

Built-in Threat Detection

To attack this issue, and as part of the ongoing security story of SQL Server, Microsoft has now invested in the feature called Database Threat Detection. When enabled, the service will automatically scan the audit records generated from the database and will flag any anomalies that it detects. There are many patterns of injections so it makes sense to have a machine be the one reading all the SQL and flagging them. MS is not disclosing the patterns or the algorithms in an effort to make working around the detection more difficult.

What about on-premises?

This feature right now is only available on Azure SQL Db. However, we all know that Azure SQL Db is basically the testing grounds for all major new features coming to the box product. I would not be surprised if the threat detection eventually makes it to the on-premises product as well (my speculation though, nothing announced about this).

Pre-requisites
For this new feature you will need Azure SQL Db, you will also need to have auditing enabled on the database. The current way this works is by analyzing the audit records so it’s 100% reactive, nothing proactive. You will need a storage account as well since that’s where the audit logs get stored. The portal will walk you through this whole process, we’ll see that in the demo video.

Current State
As I mentioned, right now the tool is more of a reactive tool as it only lets you know after it has detected the anomaly. In the future, I would love to see a preventive configuration where one can specify a policy to completely prevent suspicious SQL from running. Sure, there can always be false alarms, however, if all the application query patterns are known, this number should be very low. If the database is open to ad-hoc querying then a policy could allow to only prevent the queries or even shut down the database after several different alerts have been generated. The more flexible the configuration, the better, but in the end what I want to see is a move from alerting me to preventing the injection to begin with.

In the demo, I’m going to go through enabling Azure SQL threat detection, some basic injection patterns and what the alerts look like. Let’s check it out!

 

Categories: DBA Blogs

Enter the Exadata X6

Pythian Group - Mon, 2016-04-11 14:20

Data is exploding and Exadata is catching up. With the proliferation of cloud technology and in-memory databases; Oracle Exadata X6-2 and X6-8 has it all. It seems to be an ideal platform for hyper-convergence for any data center running Oracle products.

Following are some of the salient features of Oracle X6:

  • The compute nodes have twenty two-core Intel Xeon E5-2699 v4 processors
  • The memory is DDR4 and of size 256Gb and it can be expanded to 768Gb.
  • The local storage can now be upgraded to 8 drives from default of 4.
  • The cell servers have ten-core Intel Xeon E5-2630 v4 processors.
  • Flashcache has become massive here reaching up to 12.8TB. Full rack has 179TB of flash.
  • There will be up to 1.7 PB of disk capacity (raw) per rack.
  • The infiniband network will have 40Gb/second. There is no change to Infiniband. In X5 it became active/active – but that’s the only difference.
  • On the software side, there are many improvement but one thing which caught my eye is the feature that enables Storage Indexes to be moved along the data when a disk hits predictive failure or true failure. This surely will improve performance by a long way.

With X6, Exadata has surely come a long way forward.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Step 6 & 7: Setup OMS for EM13c in VMware ESXi 6.0.0

Arun Bavera - Mon, 2016-04-11 13:44
Step 6: Install and Configure the OMS on omsserver1.bavera.net and omsserver2.bavera.net
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Unzip all the files, and run em13100_linux64.bin which unzips the other files…into Disk<> folders.
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If you want to run pre-Req check this:
./em13100_linux64.bin -silent EMPREREQ_KIT=true  EMPREREQKIT_PROPERTY_FILE=/oracle/stage check.rsp -J-Djava.io.tmpdir=/oracle/stage
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMADV/install_em_exist_db_slnt.htm#EMADV109
From <http://www.redstk.com/saving-you-15-minutes-em13-1-blog-blitz-em-upgrade-pre-reqs/>
Also Refer:
https://oracle-base.com/articles/13c/cloud-control-13cr1-installation-on-oracle-linux-6-and-7
http://dbakevlar.com/2016/01/installing-a-new-enterprise-manager-13c-environment/
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/oem/install-upgrade/pr-install-em13-2835293.pdf
https://oemgc.wordpress.com/2015/12/27/upgrade-em12c-to-em13c-this-is-what-i-did/
http://www.gokhanatil.com/2015/12/how-to-upgrade-oracle-enterprise-manager-cloud-control-12c-to-em13c.html
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We ran into space issue where it required more disk space:
Allocate or resize disk size in Vsphere Client:
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Reboot machine and login as Root:
fdisk -l
Create new Physical partition from the new space 10B added to previous 30GB.
fdisk /dev/sda
Command (m for help): n
Partition type:
p primary (2 primary, 0 extended, 2 free)
e extended
Select (default p): p
Partition number (3,4, default 3):
First sector (62914560-83886079, default 62914560):
Using default value 62914560
Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (62914560-83886079, default 83886079):
Using default value 83886079
Partition 3 of type Linux and of size 10 GiB is set
Type:t choose:3
Choose: 8e to convert type Linux LVM
Changed type of partition 'Linux' to 'Linux LVM'
Choose:p
Save by choosing : w
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/36568/what-is-logical-volume-management-and-how-do-you-enable-it-in-ubuntu/
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/40702/how-to-manage-and-use-lvm-logical-volume-management-in-ubuntu/
https://www.rootusers.com/how-to-increase-the-size-of-a-linux-lvm-by-expanding-the-virtual-machine-disk/
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Reboot the Machine:
We will use : pvcreate, vgextend , lvextend and xfs_growfs to add this to our root partition '/'
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#lvdisplay
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On 4/3/2016 available plugins:
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Now Make sure the ports are according to ports you have configured in F5 LieRate Load Balancer
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This completes installation on node1: omsserver1.bavera.net
Note: Enable all the HTTP Listen ports for Managed Server, Admin Server, BIP Server as we are using HTTP ports for Load Balancing.
Step:1 Enable HTTP ports using the Admin Console:
Step 2: Unlock Console and Upload port using emctl commands
emctl status oms -details
[oracle@omsserver1 ~]$ emctl status oms -details
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 1
Copyright (c) 1996, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Enter Enterprise Manager Root (SYSMAN) Password :
Console Server Host : omsserver1.bavera.net
HTTP Console Port : 7788
HTTPS Console Port : 7803
HTTP Upload Port : 4889
HTTPS Upload Port : 4900
EM Instance Home : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1
OMS Log Directory Location : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1/sysman/log
OMS is not configured with SLB or virtual hostname
Agent Upload is locked.
OMS Console is locked.
Active CA ID: 1
Console URL: https://omsserver1.bavera.net:7803/em
Upload URL: https://omsserver1.bavera.net:4900/empbs/upload
WLS Domain Information
Domain Name : GCDomain
Admin Server Host : omsserver1.bavera.net
Admin Server HTTPS Port: 7102
Admin Server is RUNNING
Oracle Management Server Information
Managed Server Instance Name: EMGC_OMS1
Oracle Management Server Instance Host: omsserver1.bavera.net
WebTier is Up
Oracle Management Server is Up
JVMD Engine is Up
BI Publisher Server Information
BI Publisher Managed Server Name: BIP
BI Publisher Server is Up
BI Publisher HTTP Managed Server Port : 9701
BI Publisher HTTPS Managed Server Port : 9803
BI Publisher HTTP OHS Port : 9788
BI Publisher HTTPS OHS Port : 9851
BI Publisher is locked.
BI Publisher Server named 'BIP' running at URL: https://omsserver1.bavera.net:9851/xmlpserver
BI Publisher Server Logs: /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/user_projects/domains/GCDomain/servers/BIP/logs/
BI Publisher Log : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/user_projects/domains/GCDomain/servers/BIP/logs/bipublisher/bipublisher.log
[oracle@omsserver1 ~]$
=====================================================================================
Step 7: Register the SLB, Unlock HTTP upload and Console
We will use Self Signed Certificate:
openssl req -x509 -nodes -sha256 -days 3650 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout em13c.bavera.net.key -out em13c.bavera.net.crt
openssl rsa -in em13c.bavera.net.key -text > em13c.bavera.net.key.pem
openssl x509 -inform PEM -in em13c.bavera.net.crt > em13c.bavera.net.crt.pem
openssl x509 -noout -text -in em13c.bavera.net.crt
Note: Same Certificate has been imported in SSL Profile for LineRate Load Balancer
[oracle@omsserver1 ~]$ emctl secure oms -host em13c.bavera.net -secure_port 4900 -slb_port 4900 -slb_console_port 443 -slb_jvmd_http_port 7202 -slb_bip_http_port 8080 -trust_certs_loc /home/oracle/em13c.bavera.net.crt.pem
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 1
Copyright (c) 1996, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Securing OMS... Started.
Enter Enterprise Manager Root (SYSMAN) Password :
Enter Agent Registration Password :
Securing OMS... Successful
Restart OMS
[oracle@omsserver1 ~]$
emctl secure oms -unlock_upload -unlock_console
emctl secure unlock -console -upload
[oracle@omsserver1 ~]$ emctl secure unlock -console -upload
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 1
Copyright (c) 1996, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Enter Enterprise Manager Root (SYSMAN) Password :
OMS Console is unlocked. HTTP ports too can be used to access console.
BI Publisher is unlocked. HTTP ports too can be used to access BI Publisher.
Agent Upload is unlocked. Unsecure Agents may upload over HTTP.
Restart OMS.
emctl stop oms -all;emctl start oms
Verify the Load Balancer and Certificates:
emctl secdiag openurl -url https://em13c.bavera.net/empbs/upload
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[oracle@omsserver1 config]$ emctl status oms -details
Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c Release 1
Copyright (c) 1996, 2015 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
Enter Enterprise Manager Root (SYSMAN) Password :
Console Server Host : omsserver1.bavera.net
HTTP Console Port : 7788
HTTPS Console Port : 7803
HTTP Upload Port : 4889
HTTPS Upload Port : 4900
EM Instance Home : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1
OMS Log Directory Location : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/em/EMGC_OMS1/sysman/log
SLB or virtual hostname: em13c.bavera.net
HTTPS SLB Upload Port : 4900
HTTPS SLB Console Port : 443
HTTP SLB JVMD Port : 7202
Agent Upload is unlocked.
OMS Console is unlocked.
Active CA ID: 1
Console URL: https://em13c.bavera.net:443/em
Upload URL: https://em13c.bavera.net:4900/empbs/upload
WLS Domain Information
Domain Name : GCDomain
Admin Server Host : omsserver1.bavera.net
Admin Server HTTPS Port: 7102
Admin Server is RUNNING
Oracle Management Server Information
Managed Server Instance Name: EMGC_OMS1
Oracle Management Server Instance Host: omsserver1.bavera.net
WebTier is Up
Oracle Management Server is Up
JVMD Engine is Up
BI Publisher Server Information
BI Publisher Managed Server Name: BIP
BI Publisher Server is Up
BI Publisher HTTP Managed Server Port : 9701
BI Publisher HTTPS Managed Server Port : 9803
BI Publisher HTTP OHS Port : 9788
BI Publisher HTTPS OHS Port : 9851
BI Publisher HTTPS SLB Port : Not Set
BI Publisher HTTP SLB Port : 8080
BI Publisher is unlocked.
BI Publisher Server named 'BIP' running at URL: https://em13c.bavera.net:9851/xmlpserver
BI Publisher Server Logs: /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/user_projects/domains/GCDomain/servers/BIP/logs/
BI Publisher Log : /u01/app/oracle/em13c/gc_inst/user_projects/domains/GCDomain/servers/BIP/logs/bipublisher/bipublisher.log
[oracle@omsserver1 config]$
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Resecure/Unsecure the Agents with this new Load Balancer Host and HTTP Repository URL:
Cd $AGENT_HOME
./emctl secure agent -emdWalletSrcUrl https://em13c.bavera.net:4900/empbs/wallets/emd
If you want to Unsecure
./emctl unsecure agent
Goto sysman/config -> open emd.properties change the
REPOSITORY_URL= http://em13c.bavera.net:4889/empbs/upload/
Restart agent
Step:11 Add additional OMS on server omsserver2.bavera.net
Refer: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMBSC/install_addln_oms.htm#EMBSC177
Add the additional Agent on server2:
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Add the Additional OMS using the "Add Oracle Management Service" Deployment Procedure (preferred method)
From <http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMADV/ha_setup.htm#EMADV14396>
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMBSC/install_addln_oms.htm#EMBSC171
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(Current OMS Count + 1) x Processes Parameter Value Per OMS for the Current Deployment Size
SMALL, then the Processes parameter value to be set is computed this way: (1 + 1) x 300 = 600.
PROCESSES = 600
SESSIONS = (1.1 * PROCESSES) + 5
TRANSACTIONS = 1.1 * SESSIONS
alter system set processes = 600 scope = spfile;
alter system set sessions = 660 scope = spfile;
alter system set transactions = 726 scope = spfile;
shutdown immediate;
startup;
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Note: I had allocated 1GB RAM for this VM, which would have caused delay in deployment. I eventually increased it to 10GB
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Categories: Development

Step 5: Install the OMR Database12c for EM13c

Arun Bavera - Mon, 2016-04-11 13:43
Step 5: Install and Configure the OMR using DB Templates
Download: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/oem/enterprise-manager/downloads/db-templates-2767916.html
Install Document: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMBSC/appdx_seed_db_template.htm#EMBSC242
Create the clone of VM from omsserver2 and save as "192.168.50.50 emrep.bavera.net emrep"
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Use the DB Template downloaded from OTN to create the OMR Database.
Extract the 12.1.0.2.0_Database_Template_for_EM13_1_0_0_0_<platform>.zip file to the following location on the database host.
$<DB_HOME>/assistants/dbca/templates
For example,
/u01/software/oracle/database/dbhome_1/assistants/dbca/templates
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12.1.0.2.0_Database_Template_for_EM13_1_0_0_0_Small_deployment.dbc
Database Components Component Selected Oracle JVM true Oracle Text true Oracle Multimedia true Oracle OLAP true Oracle Spatial true Oracle Label Security true Sample Schemas false Oracle Application Express true Oracle Database Vault true
Initialization Parameters Name Value audit_file_dest {ORACLE_BASE}/admin/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/adump audit_trail DB cluster_database FALSE compatible 12.1.0.2.0 control_files ("{ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/control01.ctl", "{ORACLE_BASE}/fast_recovery_area/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/control02.ctl") db_block_size 8192 db_name diagnostic_dest {ORACLE_BASE} dispatchers (PROTOCOL=TCP) (SERVICE={SID}XDB) open_cursors 300 parallel_max_servers 8 parallel_min_servers 0 pga_aggregate_target 1000000000 processes 300 remote_login_passwordfile EXCLUSIVE session_cached_cursors 200 sga_target 3000000000 undo_tablespace UNDOTBS1
Character Sets Name Value Database Character Set WE8MSWIN1252 National Character Set AL16UTF16
Data Files Name Tablespace Size(M) {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/mgmt_ad4j.dbf MGMT_AD4J_TS 200 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/mgmt_depot.dbf MGMT_ECM_DEPOT_TS 40 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/mgmt.dbf MGMT_TABLESPACE 1300 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/sysaux01.dbf SYSAUX 680 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/system01.dbf SYSTEM 1020 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/undotbs01.dbf UNDOTBS1 1150 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/users01.dbf USERS 5 {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/temp01.dbf TEMP 2318
Control Files Name {ORACLE_BASE}/oradata/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/control01.ctl {ORACLE_BASE}/fast_recovery_area/{DB_UNIQUE_NAME}/control02.ctl
Redo Log Groups Group Size(K) 1 296960 2 296960 3 296960
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Note: remember to choose UTF8
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Afte the install make sure firewall is disabled as it is lab or enable 1521 manually in firewall rules for required Hosts
# systemctl stop firewalld
# systemctl disable firewalld
Removed symlink /etc/systemd/system/dbus-org.fedoraproject.FirewallD1.service.
Removed symlink /etc/systemd/system/basic.target.wants/firewalld.service.
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Apply latest DB Patchset: refer Document Version Download link Included in Windows Bundle 21948354.8 12.1.0.2.160119 (Jan 2016) Database Patch Set Update (DB PSU) Patch:21948354 12.1.0.2 Patch 160119
From <https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocumentDisplay?_afrLoop=91031286431995&id=1924126.1&_afrWindowMode=0&_adf.ctrl-state=jzzx3wr43_94>





























































Categories: Development

Step 3 & 4: Setup Load Balancer LineRate from F5 for EM13c

Arun Bavera - Mon, 2016-04-11 13:36
Step 3: Install and prepare the Load Balancer LineRate from F5 [free product]:
Download: https://linerate.f5.com/try/download
Doc: https://support.f5.com/kb/en-us/products/linerate/versions.2-6-1.html
http://linuxpoison.blogspot.com/2008/09/opensource-load-balancing-software.html
EM12cR5 - http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E24628_01/install.121/e24089/ha_setup.htm#EMADV14386
EM13c - https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMADV/ha_setup.htm#EMADV11590
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Account: admin/changeme
https://192.168.1.89:8443
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Put Phone Home Details with your F5 account and resubmit active license:
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Change password: type
configure
username admin secret "<password>"
write
Assign the IP address:
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Change the Hostname:
LROS(config)# configure
LROS(config)# hostname loadbalancer.bavera.net
*loadbalancer.bavera.net(config)# write
Building configuration...
[OK]
*loadbalancer.bavera.net(config)#show run
Step 4: Configure your Load Balancer for EM13c
From <https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMADV/ha_setup.htm#EMADV11590> for EM13c
https://192.168.1.89:8443/lrs/api/v1.0/status/app/proxy/stats/data/realServer/ccuc_omsserver1
https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMADV/ha_setup.htm#EMADV11590
Monitors we will be using: Cloud Control Service TCP Port Monitor Name Type Interval Timeout Send String Receive String Secure Console (when not using SSO) 7799 mon_ccsc https 5 16 GET /em/consoleStatus.jsp HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: \r\nConnection: Close \r\n\r\n Enterprise Manager Console is UP Secure Console (when using SSO) 7799 mon_ccsc https 5 15 GET /empbs/genwallet \r\n GenWallet Servlet activated Unsecure Console (when not using SSO) 7788 mon_ccuc http 5 16 GET /em/consoleStatus.jsp HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: \r\nConnection: Close \r\n\r\n Enterprise Manager Console is UP Unsecure BI Publisher Console 9788 mon_ccucbip http 5 16 GET /xmlpserver/services HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: \r\nConnection: Close \r\n\r\n And now... Some Services Secure Upload 4900 mon_ccsu https 60 181 GET /empbs/upload \r\n Http Receiver Servlet active! Agent Registration 4889 mon_ccar http 60 181 GET /empbs/genwallet \r\n GenWallet Servlet activated Always-On Monitoring Secure Upload 8081 mon_ccaom https 60 181 GET /upload \r\n Always On Monitoring is active
F5 LineRate Equivalent configure CLI commands: configure
health-monitor mon_ccuc
interval 5
timeout 16
server-down "8/10"
server-up "9/10"
type http
request-method GET
request-target "/em/consoleStatus.jsp"
admin-status online
write









configure
health-monitor mon_ccucbip
interval 5
timeout 16
server-down "8/10"
server-up "9/10"
type http
request-method GET
request-target "/xmlpserver/services"
admin-status online
write









configure
health-monitor mon_ccsu
interval 60
timeout 181
server-down "8/10"
server-up "9/10"
type http (value same for https)
request-method GET
request-target "/empbs/upload"
admin-status online
write









configure
health-monitor mon_ccar
interval 60
timeout 181
server-down "8/10"
server-up "9/10"
type http
request-method GET
request-target "/empbs/genwallet"
admin-status online
write









configure
health-monitor mon_ccaom
interval 60
timeout 181
server-down "8/10"
server-up "9/10"
type http (value same for https)
request-method GET
request-target "/upload "
admin-status online
write










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Real Servers in F5 LineRate: configure
real-server ccuc_omsserver1
ip address 192.168.50.41 7788
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccuc
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccucbip_omsserver1
ip address 192.168.50.41 9788
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccucbip
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccsu_omsserver1
ip address 192.168.50.41 4900
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccsu
service http (value same for https)
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccar_omsserver1
ip address 192.168.50.41 4889
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccar
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccaom_omsserver1
ip address 192.168.50.41 8081
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccaom
service http (value same for https)
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccuc_omsserver2
ip address 192.168.50.42 7788
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccuc
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccucbip_omsserver2
ip address 192.168.50.42 9788
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccucbip
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccsu_omsserver2
ip address 192.168.50.42 4900
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccsu
attach ssl profile ssl_prof_em13c.bavera.net
service http (value same for https)
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write










configure
real-server ccar_omsserver2
ip address 192.168.50.42 4889
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccar
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write









configure
real-server ccaom_omsserver2
ip address 192.168.50.42 8081
max-connections 1000
admin-status online
attach health-monitor mon_ccaom
service http (value same for https)
keepalive-timeout 3600
response-timeout 60
response-idle-timeout 60
write










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Pools we will be using: Cloud Control Services Pool Name Associated Health Monitor Load Balancing Members Secure Console pool_ccsc mon_ccsc Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:7799
OMS Host B:7799
Secure BI Publisher pool_ccscbip mon_ccscbip Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:9851
OMS Host B:9851
Unsecure Console pool_ccuc mon_ccuc Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:7788
OMS Host B:7788
Unsecure BI Publisher pool_ccucbip mon_ccucbip Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:9788
OMS Host B:9788
Secure Upload pool_ccsu mon_ccsu Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:4900
OMS Host B:4900
Agent Registration pool_ccar mon_ccar Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:4889
OMS Host B:4889
Always-On Monitoring Secure Upload pool_ccaom mon_ccaom Least Connections (member) OMS Host A:8081
OMS Host B:8081

F5 LineRate equivalent “real server group” for F5 Pool: configure
real-server group pool_ccuc
members by regex " ccuc_.*"
write


configure
real-server group pool_ccucbip
members by regex " ccucbip_.*"
write


configure
real-server group pool_ccsu
members by regex " ccsu_.*"
write


configure
real-server group pool_ccar
members by regex " ccar_.*"
write


configure
real-server group pool_ccaom
members by regex " ccaom_.*"
write




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TCP Profiles we will be using
CLOUD CONTROL SERVICE TCP PROFILE NAME Secure Console tcp_ccsc Secure BIP Console tcp_ccscbip Unsecure Console tcp_ccuc Unsecure BIP Console tcp_ccucbip Secure Upload tcp_ccsu Agent Registration tcp_ccar Always-On Monitoring Secure Upload tcp_ccaom

Persistence Profiles we will be using:
CLOUD CONTROL SERVICE F5 PERSISTENCE PROFILE NAME Type Timeout Expiration Secure Console sourceip_ccsc Source Address Affinity 3600 Not Applicable Secure BIP Console sourceip_ccscbip Source Address Affinity 3600 Not Applicable Unsecure Console sourceip_ccuc Source Address Affinity 3600 Not Applicable Unsecure BIP Console sourceip_ccucbip Source Address Affinity 3600 Not Applicable Agent Registration cookie_ccar Cookie Not Applicable 3600

configure
tcp-options-group tcp_ccuc
write

configure
tcp-options-group tcp_ccucbip
write

configure
tcp-options-group tcp_ccsu
write

configure
tcp-options-group tcp_ccar
write

configure
tcp-options-group tcp_ccaom
write




















Virtual Servers we will be using
Cloud Control Service Virtual Server Name Virtual IP and Port Protocol Profile (Client) HTTP Profile Source Address Translation iRule Defaut Pool Default Persistence Profile Secure Console vs_ccsc443 VIP:443 tcp_ccsc None Automap None pool_ccsc sourceip_ccsc Secure BI Publisher vs_ccscbip5443 VIP:5443 tcp_ccscbip None Automap None pool_ccscbip Sourceip_ccscbip Unsecure Console * vs_ccuc80 VIP:80 tcp_ccuc http Automap None pool_ccuc sourceip_ccuc Unsecure BI Publisher * vs_ccucbip8080 VIP:8080 tcp_ccucbip http Automap None pool_ccucbip sourceip_ccucbip Secure Upload vs_ccsu4900 VIP:4900 tcp_ccsu None Automap None pool_ccsu None Agent Registration vs_ccar4889 VIP:4889 tcp_ccar http Automap None pool_ccar cookie_ccar Always-On Monitoring Secure Upload vs_ccaom8081 VIP:8081 tcp_ccaom None Automap None pool_ccaom sourceip_aom
* These entries are not considered best practice and are not recommended as they provide unsecured and unencrypted access to Enterprise Manager. But we will be using the SSL termination at the Load Balancer, depending upon the Load Balancer security and Firewall and offloading the SSL processing and need for SSL certificate at each components at EM13c.

Management Service Ports Cloud Control Service TCP Port Monitor Name TCP Profile Name Persistence Profile Pool Name Virtual Server Name Virtual Server Port Secure Console 7799 mon_ccsc tcp_ccsc sourceip_ccsc pool_ccsc vs_ccsc443 443 Secure BI Publisher 9851 mon_ccscbip tcp_ccscbip sourceip_ccscbip pool_ccscbip vs_ccscbip5443 5443 Unsecure Console 7788 mon_ccuc tcp_ccuc sourceip_ccuc pool_ccuc vs_ccuc80 80 Unsecure BI Publisher 9788 mon_ccucbip tcp_ccucbip sourceip_ccucbip pool_ccucbip vs_ccucbip8080 8080 Secure Upload 4900 mon_ccsu tcp_ccsu None pool_ccsu vs_ccsu4900 4900 Agent Registration 4889 mon_ccar tcp_ccar cookie_ccar pool_ccar vs_ccar4889 4889 Always-On Monitoring Secure Upload 8081 mon_ccaom tcp_ccaom None pool_ccaom vs_ccaom8081 8081


configure
virtual-ip vs_ccuc80_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 80
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccuc
write
exit
configure
virtual-ip vs_ccuc443_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 443
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccuc
write
exit
















configure
virtual-ip vs_ccucbip8080_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 8080
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccucbip
write
exit









configure
virtual-ip vs_ccsu4900_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 4900
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccsu
write
exit









configure
virtual-ip vs_ccar4889_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 4889
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccar
write
exit









configure
virtual-ip vs_ccaom8081_ip
ip address 192.168.50.80 8081
admin-status online
service http
keepalive-timeout 3600
attach tcp-options-group tcp_ccaom
write
exit









configure
virtual-server vs_ccuc80
lb-algorithm round-robin
attach virtual-ip vs_ccuc80_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccuc
service http
persist source-ip
persist source-ip idle-timeout 3600
write
exit
exit
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configure
virtual-server vs_ccuc443
lb-algorithm round-robin
attach virtual-ip vs_ccuc443_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccuc
service http
persist source-ip
persist source-ip idle-timeout 3600
write
exit
exit























configure
virtual-server vs_ccucbip8080
lb-algorithm round-robin
attach virtual-ip vs_ccucbip8080_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccucbip
service http
persist source-ip
persist source-ip idle-timeout 3600
write
exit
exit











configure
virtual-server vs_ccsu4900
lb-algorithm round-robin
attach virtual-ip vs_ccsu4900_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccsu
service http

write
exit









configure
virtual-server vs_ccar4889
lb-algorithm round-robin
attach virtual-ip vs_ccar4889_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccar
service http
persist cookie agent12c
persist cookie agent12c expires 3600
write
exit
exit











configure
virtual-server vs_ccaom8081
lb-algorithm round-robin


attach virtual-ip vs_ccaom8081_ip default
attach real-server group pool_ccaom
service http
write
exit
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Create Self Signed Certificate and attach it to your Virtual IP’s

openssl req -x509 -nodes -sha256 -days 3650 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout em13c.bavera.net.key -out em13c.bavera.net.crt
openssl rsa -in em13c.bavera.net.key -text > em13c.bavera.net.key.pem
openssl x509 -inform PEM -in em13c.bavera.net.crt > em13c.bavera.net.crt.pem
openssl x509 -noout -text -in em13c.bavera.net.crt

emctl secure oms -host em13c.bavera.net -secure_port 4900 -slb_port 4900 -slb_console_port 443 -slb_jvmd_http_port 7202 -slb_bip_http_port 8080 -trust_certs_loc /home/oracle/em13c.bavera.net.crt.pem
Step 1: configure Key:
configure
4. Type:
key key_em13c.bavera.net
5. Type:
pem-format
6. Paste the text from the private key file and press Enter.
7. Type:
quit
8. Type:
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Step 2: Configure Certificate:
Open the primary certificate file in a text editor and copy the text.
2. Type:
configure
3. Type:
certificate cert_em13c.bavera.net
4. Type:
pem-format
5. Paste the text from the certificate file and press Enter.
6. Type:
quit











Step 3: To configure SSL termination:
Type:
configure
2. Type:
ssl profile ssl_prof_em13c.bavera.net
3. Type:
attach key key_em13c.bavera.net
4. Type:
attach certificate cert_em13c.bavera.net
5. Type:
virtual-ip vs_ccsu4900_ip
6. Type:
attach ssl profile ssl_prof_em13c.bavera.net
7. Type:
virtual-ip vs_ccuc443_ip
attach ssl profile ssl_prof_em13c.bavera.net
show virtual-ip vs_ccsu4900_ip
show virtual-ip vs_ccuc443_ip
8. Write






















After the install of OMS2:
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Categories: Development

Step 2: EM13c VM's Setup on VMWare ESXi 6.0.0

Arun Bavera - Mon, 2016-04-11 12:43
Step 2: Plan your network for EM13c Installation:
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# Private_Network - eth0 - node RAC interconnect
10.0.0.1 dbserver1-priv.bavera.net dbserver1-priv
10.0.0.2 dbserver2-priv.bavera.net dbserver2-priv
# Public_Network - eth1 - Host IP
192.168.50.11 dbserver1.bavera.net dbserver1
192.168.50.12 dbserver2.bavera.net dbserver2
192.168.50.41 omsserver1.bavera.net omsserver1
192.168.50.42 omsserver2.bavera.net omsserver2
192.168.50.50 emrep.bavera.net emrep
192.168.50.80 em13c.bavera.net em13c #LineRate Load Balancer VIP - Free Load Balancer from F5
192.168.50.90 oem13c.bavera.net em13c #BIG-IP Load Balancer VIP - May be later 90Days license only
# Virtual IP
192.168.50.21 dbserver1-vip.bavera.net dbserver1-vip
192.168.50.22 dbserver2-vip.bavera.net dbserver2-vip
# SCAN
192.168.50.31 dbserver-scan.bavera.net dbserver-scan
192.168.50.32 dbserver-scan.bavera.net dbserver-scan
192.168.50.33 dbserver-scan.bavera.net dbserver-scan
127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4
::1 localhost localhost.localdomain localhost6 localhost6.localdomain6
Vmware AMT: http://192.168.1.100:16992/ Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 To Internet DHCP eth0 DHCP 192.168.1.100
Vmware.bavera.net ( for vSphere Client) Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 To Internet DHCP(static) 64:00:6a:61:1b:62 vmnic0 DHCP 192.168.1.101
dbserver1.bavera.net Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method IP 1 Private RAC Interconnect- FIXED 00:0c:29:a3:be:2d eth0 Static 10.0.0.1 2 Public /Host IP -FIXED 00:0c:29:a3:be:37 eth1 Static 192.168.50.11 3 To Internet DHCP 00:0c:29:a3:be:41 eth2 DHCP 192.168.1.88
dbserver2.bavera.net Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 Private RAC Interconnect- FIXED 00:0c:29:a5:b0:2d eth0 Static 10.0.0.2 2 Public /Host IP -FIXED 00:0c:29:a5:b0:37 eth1 Static 192.168.50.12 3 To Internet DHCP 00:0c:29:a5:b0:41 eth2 DHCP 192.168.1.86
omsserver1.bavera.net Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 Public /Host IP -FIXED 00:0c:29:09:1a:f7 eth0 Static 192.168.50.41 2 To Internet DHCP 00:0c:29:09:1a:01 eth1 DHCP 192.168.1.74
omsserver2.bavera.net Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 Public /Host IP -FIXED eth1 Static 192.168.50.42 2 To Internet DHCP eth2 DHCP 192.168.1.90
loadbalancer.bavera.net Network Adapter Purpose MAC Address Interface Method 1 Public /Host IP -FIXED em1 Static 192.168.50.80 2 To Internet DHCP em0 DHCP 192.168.1.89
Step 3: Creating your VM inside ESXi 6.0.0
Login using vSPhere Client from your laptop/desktop:
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Step 4: Installing Linux in your VM
We will be using Oracle Linux 7 64 bit with EM 13c 13.1.0.0
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Browse Datastore and upload this ISO.
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Configure your VM for shared disk access and oracle user
/usr/sbin/groupadd -g 54321 oinstall
/usr/sbin/useradd -u 54321 -g oinstall -G dba,asmdba,backupdba,dgdba,kmdba oracle
mkdir -p /u01/app/oracle
chown oracle:oinstall /u01/app/oracle
mkdir -p /u01/app/oraInventory
chown oracle:oinstall /u01/app/oraInventory
chmod -R 775 /u01/app/oracle
chmod -R 775 /u01/app/oraInventory
chown oracle:oinstall /u01/app
echo "inventory_loc=/u01/app/oraInventory" >/etc/oraInst.loc
echo "inst_group=oinstall" >>/etc/oraInst.loc
mkdir -p /u02/shared; chown -R oracle:oinstall /u02/shared
[root@omsserver1 ~]# service nfs status
Redirecting to /bin/systemctl status nfs.service
● nfs-server.service - NFS server and services
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/nfs-server.service; disabled; vendor preset: disabled)
Active: inactive (dead)
Put /etc/hosts entries in omsserver1:
Put /etc/fstab entry for software access:
192.168.50.11:/u02/shared/ /u02/shared/ nfs defaults 0 0
Also, make sure dbserver1 which is the NFS server has allow entry for this server in /etc/exports
[root@dbserver1 ~]# cat /etc/exports
/u02/shared/ 192.168.50.12(rw,sync,no_root_squash)
/u02/shared/ 192.168.50.41(rw,sync,no_root_squash)
/u02/shared/ 192.168.50.42(rw,sync,no_root_squash)
Add or amend the following lines in the "/etc/sysctl.conf" file.
fs.file-max = 6815744
kernel.sem = 250 32000 100 128
kernel.shmmni = 4096
kernel.shmall = 1073741824
kernel.shmmax = 4398046511104
net.core.rmem_default = 262144
net.core.rmem_max = 4194304
net.core.wmem_default = 262144
net.core.wmem_max = 1048576
fs.aio-max-nr = 1048576
net.ipv4.ip_local_port_range = 9000 65500
Run the following command to change the current kernel parameters.
/sbin/sysctl -p
Add the following lines to the "/etc/security/limits.conf" file.
oracle soft nofile 1024
oracle hard nofile 65536
oracle soft nproc 16384
oracle hard nproc 16384
oracle soft stack 10240
oracle hard stack 32768
Install the following packages if they are not already present.
Amend the "/etc/security/limits.d/90-nproc.conf
# Change this
* soft nproc 1024
# To this
* - nproc 16384
vi /etc/fstab
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults,size=4g 0 0
Add oracle sudoers so that user can sudo as root as this is Test lab:
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https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/System_Administrators_Guide/sect-Managing_Services_with_systemd-Services.html
http://dbakevlar.com/2016/01/installing-a-new-enterprise-manager-13c-environment/
Install the VMWARE Tools
1. Click VM in the virtual machine menu, then click Guest > Install/Upgrade VMware Tools.
From <https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1018414>
Step 5: Clone your VM to create second VM
Now, the VM is ready for OMS installation, clone it and create omsserver2 from this
copy .vmx and .vmdk files to "omsserver2.bavera.net" folder 
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rename the file "omsserver1.bavera.net.vmx" to "omsserver2.bavera.net.vmx" 
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Ssh to vmware Host and change the vmdk to omsserver2
cd /vmfs/volumes/SSD/omsserver2.bavera.net
vmkfstools -E omsserver1.bavera.net.vmdk omsserver2.bavera.net.vmdk
[root@vmware:/vmfs/volumes/56e1c821-c906c26c-c53b-64006a611b62/omsserver2.bavera.net] vmkfstools -E omsserver1.bavera.net.vmdk omsserver2.bavera.net.vmdk
[root@vmware:/vmfs/volumes/56e1c821-c906c26c-c53b-64006a611b62/omsserver2.bavera.net] ls -ltr
total 31457288
-rw------- 1 root root 2896 Mar 27 16:11 omsserver2.bavera.net.vmx
-rw------- 1 root root 32212254720 Mar 27 16:11 omsserver2.bavera.net-flat.vmdk
-rw------- 1 root root 538 Mar 27 16:19 omsserver2.bavera.net.vmdk
Add this "vmx" file to inventory using vSphere Client:
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Now, edit Settings for this new VM, remove the old harddsk and add the copied vmdk as new harddisk
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Add new Harddisk:
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Note: For EM13c 30GB on root partition is not enough if you are going to have Linux OS also on the same mount:
Minimum CPU, RAM, Heap Size, and Hard Disk Space Requirements Per OMS Evaluation or Simple Installation Advanced Installation (SMALL) Advanced Installation (MEDIUM) Advanced Installation (LARGE) Deployment Size Evaluation or Simple Small Medium Large Configuration 1 OMS, <100 Targets, <10 Agents, <3 Concurrent User Sessions 1 OMS, <1000 Targets, <100 Agents, <10 Concurrent User Sessions 2 OMSes, >=1000 but <10,000 Targets, >=100 but <1000 Agents,>=10 but <25 Concurrent User Sessions 2 OMSes, >=10,000 Targets, >=1000 Agents, >=25 but <=50 Concurrent User Sessions 4 OMSes, >=10,000 Targets, >=1000 Agents, >=25 but <=50 Concurrent User Sessions CPU Cores/Host
(Can be shared with other processes)
2 4 6 12 6 RAMFoot 1
(With Oracle BI Publisher and JVMD Engine)
10 GB 10 GB 12 GB 24 GB 12 GB Hard Disk Space
(With Oracle Software Library, Oracle BI Publisher, and JVMD Engine)
24 GB 24 GB 24 GB 24 GB 24 GB Temporary Directory Hard Disk Space 10 GB 10 GB 10 GB 10 GB 10 GB Oracle WebLogic Server JVM Heap Size 1 GB 1.7 GB 4 GB 8 GB 4 GB
Footnote 1 The physical memory mentioned here includes .5 GB of RAM required for Oracle BI Publisher. At the time of installation, if you choose not to configure Oracle BI Publisher, then the actual physical memory required can be .5 GB less than what is mentioned here.
From <https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E63000_01/EMBSC/preinstall_req_hw.htm#EMBSC124>
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Note, down the MAC address for each network card, as it was cloned we have to change it later:
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Change the hostname in /etc/hostname ( Linux 7.2) for Linux 6 use /etc/sysconfig/network
Also, disable the selinux in /etc/sysconfig/selinux
Goto /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts change the ip address , also you can use network setting to change the ip
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Categories: Development

Step 1: Setup VMware ESXi 6.0.0

Arun Bavera - Mon, 2016-04-11 12:04
     
    My intention was to setup a personal EM13c lab using affordable hardware and software but application infrastructure and topology as much as similar to Production grade.
    Technorati Tags: , Dell PowerEdge T20 - Xeon E3-1225 @3.2 Ghz
    28GB RAM, 500GB SSD+1TB HDD
    VMWare ESXi 6.0.0.
    Oracle Linux 7.2 for OMS 13c and Database12c
    F5 LineRate Precision Load Balancer 2.6.1


    1. Get the cheap server you can afford, look for deals at slickdeals.net. I bought a DELL-T20 and additional 500GB SSD and extra RAM.
    2. Enable AMT ( ctrl+P) admin user: http://192.168.1.100:16992/index.htm?
    3. Use Rufus 2.7 to write the ISO image, other tools didn’t work
    4. https://www.vmware.com/support/developer/vcli/
    5. Make sure the machine boots from your ISO disk and install Vmware ESXi
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Categories: Development

Extend your SOA Domain with Insight

Darwin IT - Mon, 2016-04-11 11:43
Lately I wrote about how to install RealTime Integration Business Insight. It's about installing the software, actually. In the quickstart you'll read that you actually have to extend your domain as well.

It actually states that you can install it in your SOA QuickStart  installment as well, but I didn't try that (yet).

However, you need to extend your domain with the following items:
  • Insight SOA Agent 12.2.1 [soa]
  • Insight Service Bus Agent 12.2.1 [osb]
  • Insight 12.2.1 [soa]
To do so, shutdown your domain (if not done so), but (as I found needed) start (or leave it up) your infra database.

Set your FMW environment, as I put in my fmw12c_env.sh script:
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ cat ~/bin/fmw12c_env.sh
#!/bin/bash
echo set Fusion MiddleWare 12cR2 environment
export JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74
export FMW_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210
export WL_HOME=${FMW_HOME}/wlserver
export NODEMGR_HOME=/u01/app/work/domains/soabpm12c_dev/nodemanager

export SOA_HOME=$FMW_HOME/soa
export OSB_HOME=$FMW_HOME/osb
export MFT_HOME=$FMW_HOME/mft
#
echo call setWLSEnv.sh
. $FMW_HOME/wlserver/server/bin/setWLSEnv.sh
export PATH=$FMW_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin:$WL_HOME/common/bin/:$WL_HOME/server/bin:$PATH[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$
... and navigate to the $FMW_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin folder and start config.sh:

[oracle@darlin-vce-db ~]$ . fmw12c_env.sh
set Fusion MiddleWare 12cR2 environment
call setWLSEnv.sh
CLASSPATH=/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/lib/tools.jar:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/modules/features/wlst.wls.classpath.jar:

PATH=/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/server/bin:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/../oracle_common/modules/org.apache.ant_1.9.2/bin:/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/jre/bin:/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/sbin:/home/oracle/.local/bin:/home/oracle/bin:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/../oracle_common/modules/org.apache.maven_3.2.5/bin

Your environment has been set.
[oracle@darlin-vce-db ~]$ cd $FMW_HOME/oracle_common/common/bin
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ ls
clonedunpack.sh config_builder.sh pack.sh reconfig.sh
commBaseEnv.sh config.sh prepareCustomProvider.sh setHomeDirs.sh
commEnv.sh configWallet.sh printJarVersions.sh unpack.sh
commExtEnv.sh getproperty.sh qs_config.sh wlst.sh
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ ./config.sh

In the first screen set the radio button to 'Update an existing domain':

Then Click Next, and check the items listed above:

Click Next, Next, ... Finish.
If you would have checked the 'Deployments' checkbox under the Advanced Configuration, you could have reviewed that the particular deployments are automatically targeted to the BAM, OSB and SOA clusters.

After this you can start your servers and start using insight, for example beginning with the Set up of the Insight Demo Users. This is properly described in the Quickstart Guide. But, as I'm on to it, let me try right a way. The demo users setup is downloadable here. Download it and unzip it in a folder on your server.

First we'll have to set the environment. So I call my neat fmw12_env.sh script first (in a new terminal), and explicitly set the $MW_HOME variable:
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ . fmw12c_env.sh
set Fusion MiddleWare 12cR2 environment
call setWLSEnv.sh
CLASSPATH=/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/lib/tools.jar:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/modules/features/wlst.wls.classpath.jar:

PATH=/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/server/bin:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/../oracle_common/modules/org.apache.ant_1.9.2/bin:/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/jre/bin:/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/sbin:/home/oracle/.local/bin:/home/oracle/bin:/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/../oracle_common/modules/org.apache.maven_3.2.5/bin

Your environment has been set.
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ export MW_HOME=$FMW_HOME
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ echo $MW_HOME
/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ echo $JAVA_HOME
/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_74
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ echo $ANT_HOME
/u01/app/oracle/FMW12210/wlserver/../oracle_common/modules/org.apache.ant_1.9.2

We're going to call an ant script that apparently needs the following variables set:
  • MW_HOME= <Middleware home of the environment>
  • JAVA_HOME= <Location of java home>
  • ANT_HOME=$MW_HOME/oracle_common/modules/org.apache.ant_1.9.2
  • PATH=$JAVA_HOME/bin:$ANT_HOME/bin:$PATH
The first one is not set by my script (I called it $FMW_HOME), so I needed to set $MW_HOME to $FMW_HOME, the last three are set by my script.

Running the script with a developer topology domain (everything in the AdminServer or DefaultServer in the SOA QuickStart) will probably go ok. But a stuborn guy as I am tries to do this in a more production like topology with seperate SOA, OSB and BAM clusters. So it turns out that you need to adapt the insight.properties that is in the bin folder of the InsightDemoUserCreation.zip (also when you're not like me, you'll need to review it...).
After editing, mine looks like:

#Insight FOD Automation file

wls.host = darlin-vce-db
wls.port = 7001
soa_server_port = 7005
bam_server_port = 7006
userName = weblogic
passWord = welcome1
oracle_jdbc_url = jdbc:oracle:thin:@darlin-vce-db:1521:ORCL
db_soa_user = DEV_SOAINFRA
oracle_db_password = DEV_SOAINFRA
db_mds_user = DEV_MDS
mds.password = DEV_MDS
jdbc_driver = oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver

When all is right then you can run:
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ cd /media/sf_Stage/InsightDemoUserCreation/bin/
[oracle@darlin-vce-db bin]$ ant createInsightDemoUsers

Unfortunately I can't show you correct output since, although I seem to have set my properties correctly, I get failures. It turns out that my server (all in one VM) ran so slow, that Insight could not be started due to time outs in getting a database connection....
After restarting BAM all went well, except for the exceptions indicating that the users were already created.

Taking IBM Bluemix OpenWhisk for a Test Drive

Pas Apicella - Mon, 2016-04-11 04:27

OpenWhisk is a new event-driven platform that lets developers quickly and easily build feature-rich apps that automatically trigger responses to events. To read more about it view the link below. In this simple example we will explore it it's use from IBM Bluemix by returning Todays date.

https://developer.ibm.com/open/openwhisk/

Steps

1. Login to Bluemix using http://bluemix.net

2. Click on "Try OpenWhisk" as shown below


3. Once logged in to the new Bluemix Console you should see a screen as follows


At this point we can only use OpenWhisk from the command line

4. Click on "Configure CLI" button to install it

5. Once installed you can verify it's installed as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk/actions$ wsk --help
usage: wsk [-h] [-v] [--apihost hostname] [--apiversion version]
           {action,activation,namespace,package,rule,trigger,sdk,property,list}
           ...

OpenWhisk is a distributed compute service to add event-driven logic to your
apps.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -v, --verbose         verbose output
  --apihost hostname    whisk API host
  --apiversion version  whisk API version

available commands:
  {action,activation,namespace,package,rule,trigger,sdk,property,list}
    action              work with actions
    activation          work with activations
    namespace           work with namespaces
    package             work with packages
    rule                work with rules
    trigger             work with triggers
    sdk                 work with the SDK
    property            work with whisk properties
    list                list all triggers, actions, and rules in the registry

Learn more at https://developer.ibm.com/openwhisk fork on GitHub
https://github.com/openwhisk. All trademarks are the property of their
respective owners.

6. Now lets Set your OpenWhisk Namespace and Authorization Key. They are provided when you are taken to the install CLI for OpenWhisk, I simply create a script for this as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk$ cat set-namespace-key
wsk property set --auth your-rather-long-key --namespace "pasapi@au1.ibm.com_dev"

Once run you get output as follows

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk$ ./set-namespace-key
ok: whisk auth set
ok: namespace set to pasapi@au1.ibm.com_dev

7.  Now create an OpenWhisk JavaScript function as shown below

todaysdate.js

/**
 * Todays Date as an OpenWhisk action.
 */
function main(params) {
    var currentTime = new Date();
    return {payload:  'Todays date is, ' + currentTime + '!'};
}

8. Create the OpenWhisk action as shown below

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk/actions$ wsk action create todaysdate todaysdate.js
ok: created action todaysdate

9. Invoke the action as shown below

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk/actions$  wsk action invoke todaysdate --blocking --result
{
    "payload": "Todays date is, Mon Apr 11 2016 10:14:56 GMT+0000 (UTC)!"
}

10. Invoke it again this displaying the full Response Object as shown below

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk/actions$  wsk action invoke todaysdate --blocking
ok: invoked todaysdate with id dbb447b65b06433a8b511187011f5715
response:
{
    "result": {
        "payload": "Todays date is, Mon Apr 11 2016 10:19:07 GMT+0000 (UTC)!"
    },
    "status": "success",
    "success": true
}

11. We can view our current actions using a command as follows, you can see we have added the "todaysdate" function

pasapicella@pas-macbook-pro:~/ibm/bluemix/openwhisk/actions$ wsk list
entities in namespace: pasapi@au1.ibm.com_dev
packages
actions
/pasapi@au1.ibm.com_dev/todaysdate                            private
/pasapi@au1.ibm.com_dev/hello                                     private
triggers
rules

12. Now lets return to the Bluemix Web Console and click on "Inspect activity metrics and logs"
Here you can view what you have invoked


There is clearly more to OpenWhisk then just this BUT for more information the IBM Bluemix docs have some more demos to try out.

https://new-console.ng.bluemix.net/docs/openwhisk/index.htmlhttp://feeds.feedburner.com/TheBlasFromPas
Categories: Fusion Middleware

installing Tomcat through bitnami

Pat Shuff - Mon, 2016-04-11 01:07
This week we are going to focus on installing Tomcat on to cloud servers. Today we are going to take the easy route. We are going to use bitnami and look at timings of how long everything takes as well as the automatic configurations that it sets up. In previous lesions we talked about linking your cloud accounts to bitnami and will not repeat that instructions. For those that are new to public domain software, Tomcat is a public domain software package that allows you to host java applications similar to WebLogic. I won't get in to a debate over which is better because we will be covering how to install WebLogic in a later blog. I will give you all the information that you need to make that decision of which is best for our company and implementation.

We login to our oracle.bitnami.com web site and verify our account credentials.

We want to launch a Tomcat server so we search for Tomcat and hover over the icon. When we hover over the icon the word Launch appears and we click on this button.

Once we click Launch we get the virtual machine configuration screen.

Things to note on this screen are

  • the name is what you want to add to identify the virtual macine
  • the cloud account identifies which data center, if it is metered or un-metered, and what shapes will be available to this virtual machine
  • the network is automatically configured for ports 80 and 443 and enabled not only in the cloud network security configuration but in the operating system as well
  • the operating system gives you the option but we default to OEL 6.7
  • we could increase the disk size and select the memory/cpu option but it does not show us the cost because bitnami does not know if your account is metered or un-metered which have different costing models.

After we click the create button we get an update that shows us how the installation is progressing. The installation took just under 15 minutes to finish everything, launch the instance, and show us the configuration.

Once everything finishes we get the ip address, the passwords, and the ssh keys that were used to create this virtual machine.

We are able to open the link to the Tomcat server by clicking on the Go To The Application on the top right of the screen. This allows us to see the splash screen as well as access the management console.

When you click on the Access my Application you get the detailed information about the Tomcat server. We can go to the management console and look at the configuration as well as bring the server up and down.

At this point we have a valid configuration that we can see across the internet. The whole process took 15 minutes and did not require any editing or configurations other than selecting the configuration and giving the virtual machine a name.

Open Source Machine Learning for Oracle Developers

Gerger Consulting - Mon, 2016-04-11 00:32
Attend the webinar by Christy Maver and Scott Purdy and learn how you can apply Numenta's open source machine intelligence technology to fraud detection, anomaly detection, IT monitoring, geospatial data and more.

More than 110 people have already signed up. Register at this link.

Listen to Numenta's story from Jeff Hawkins:

Categories: Development

New A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA) for Mobile Application Framework

The recent Oracle MAF 2.3 release already available on OTN, is a major update of MAF coming less than 6 months after the last major release. This release has several new & exciting features,...

We share our skills to maximize your revenue!
Categories: DBA Blogs

Monitoring ADF 12c Client Request Time with Click History

Andrejus Baranovski - Sun, 2016-04-10 11:55
You must be excited to read this post, I will describe one very useful feature, available in ADF 12c. This feature - Click History. You can follow steps described by Duncan Mills, to enable and read click history data in server log. There is one more option available - we can read click history data from ADF request (captured by filter class) and log it in custom way (for later analysis). Click history gives such information as client request start/end time (you can calculate client request duration), component client ID, component type, action event type, etc. All this is useful to understand application performance perceived by the client.

Download sample application - DashboardApp.zip (it contains JET libraries, to render JET content within ADF). To test click history and view generated statistics, click on any button and selection component. Click history returns previous action statistics. Let's click on Cancel button:


You should see similar XML message printed in the log (click history statistics data):


To view it in readable way, you can copy it into XML file and format in JDEV:


Logged properties, useful to track client request performance:

1. CID - ECID number, identifies request
2. CST - client request start time
3. CET - client request end time
4. ETY - client event type
5. CLD - client component ID
6. CTY - client component type

XML message can be parsed and property values can be logged to DB for performance history analysis.

To enable click history, you only need to set parameter (true) in web.xml oracle.adf.view.faces.context.ENABLE_ADF_EXECUTION_CONTEXT_PROVIDER:


To read click history data from ADF request, we need to define custom filter in web.xml. Register filter under Faces Servlet:


In the filter, override doFilter and retrieve oracle.adf.view.rich.monitoring.UserActivityInfo parameter (this will return click history XML string, as above):

FBDA -- 6 : Some Bug Notes

Hemant K Chitale - Sun, 2016-04-10 09:27
Some MoS documents on FBDA Bugs

1.  Bug 16454223  :  Wrong Results  (more rows than expected)

2.  Bug 16898135  :  FBDA does not split partitions  (resulting in rows not being purged)

3.  Bug 18294320  :   ORA-01555 (ORA-2475) on SMON_SCN_TIME

4.  Bug 22456983  :   Limit on SMON_SCN_TIME affecting FBDA

5.  Document 2039070.1 :  Known Issues with Flashback Data Archive
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Categories: DBA Blogs

Recent Blog Series on Compression

Hemant K Chitale - Sun, 2016-04-10 09:16
These have been my recent posts on Compression.

1.  1.  BASIC Table Compression  (Feb-16)

2.  1b.  More on BASIC Table Compression  (Feb-16)

3.  2.  Compressed Table Partitions  (Mar-16)

4.  3.  Index (Key) Compression  (Mar-16)

4.  4.  RMAN (BASIC) Compression  (Mar-16)

5.  5.  OLTP Compression  (Mar-16)
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Categories: DBA Blogs