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Fusion Middleware

The Other

Greg Pavlik - Thu, 2014-07-03 11:33
It is the nature of short essays or speeches that they can at best explore the surface of an idea. This is a surprisingly difficult task, since ideas worth exploring usually need to be approached with some rigor. The easy use of the speech form is to promote an idea to listeners or readers who already share a common view - that is one reason speeches are effective forms for political persuasion for rallying true believers. It's much more difficult to create new vantage points or vistas into a new world - a sense of something grander that calls for further exploration.

Yet this is exactly what Ryszard Kapuscinski accomplishes in his series of talks published as The Other. Here, the Polish journalist builds on his experience and most importantly on the reflections on the Lithuanian-Jewish philosopher Emmanual Levinas to reflect on how the encounter with the Other in a broad, cross cultural sense is the defining event - and opportunity - in late (or post) modernity. For Kapuscinski, the Other is the specifically the non-European cultures in which he spent most of his career as a journalist. For another reader it might be someone very much like Kapuscinski himself.

There are three simple points that Kapuscinski raises that bear attention:

1) The era we live in provides a unique, interpersonal opportunity for encounter with the Other - which is to say that we are neither in the area of relative isolation from the Other that dominated much of human history nor are we any longer in the phase of violent domination that marked the period of European colonial expansion. We have a chance to make space for encounter to be consistently about engagement and exchange, rather than conflict.

2) This encounter cannot primarily technical, its must be interpersonal. Technical means are not only anonymous but more conducive to inculcating mass culture rather than creating space for authentic personal engagement. The current period of human history - post industrial, urbanized, technological - is given to mass culture, mass movements, as a rule - this is accelerated by globalization and communications advances. And while it is clear that the early "psychological" literature of the crowd - and I am thinking not only of the trajectory set by Gustave LeBon, but the later and more mature reflections of Ortega y Gasset - were primarily reactionary, nonetheless they point consistently to the fact that the crowd involves not just a loss of identity, but a loss of the individual: it leaves little room for real encounter and exchange.

While the increasing ability to encounter different cultures offers the possibility of real engagement,  at the same time modern mass culture is the number one threat to the Other - in that it subordinates the value of whatever is unique to whatever is both common and most importantly sellable. In visiting Ukraine over the last few years, what fascinated me the most were the things that made the country uniquely Ukrainian. Following a recent trip, I noted the following in a piece by New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof on a visit to Karapchiv: "The kids here learn English and flirt in low-cut bluejeans. They listen to Rihanna, AC/DC and Taylor Swift. They have crushes on George Clooney and Angelina Jolie, watch “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy,” and play Grand Theft Auto. The school here has computers and an Internet connection, which kids use to watch YouTube and join Facebook. Many expect to get jobs in Italy or Spain — perhaps even America."

What here makes the Other both unique and beautiful is being obliterated by mass culture. Kristof is, of course, a cheerleader for this tragedy, but the true opportunity Kapuscinski asks us to look for ways to build up and offer support in encounter.

3) Lastly and most importantly, for encounter with the Other to be one of mutual recognition and sharing, the personal encounter must have an ethical basis. Kapuscinski observes that the first half of the last century was dominated by Husserl and Heidegger - in other words by epistemic and ontological models. It is no accident, I think, that the same century was marred by enormities wrought by totalizing ideologies - where ethics is subordinated entirely, ideology can rage out of control. Kapuscinski follows Levinas in response - ultimately seeing the Other as a source of ethical responsibility is an imperative of the first order.

The diversity of human cultures is, as Solzhenitzyn rightly noted, the "wealth of mankind, its collective personalities; the very least of them wears its own special colors and bears within itself a special facet of God's design." And yet is only if we can encounter the Other in terms of mutual respect and self-confidence, in terms of exchange and recognition of value in the Other, that we can actually see the Other as a treasure - one that helps ground who I am as much as reveals the treasure for what it is. And this is our main challenge - the other paths, conflict and exclusion, are paths we cannot afford to tread.

Maven support for 12.1.3 Service Bus & SOA Suite artifacts

Edwin Biemond - Fri, 2014-06-27 14:56
With the 12.1.3 release of Oracle Service Bus and Oracle SOA Suite we finally can build all our soa projects with Maven. And this time we can do it natively without calling a utility like configjar or ANT from Maven . We start by setting all the required variables like JAVA_HOME,M2_HOME and PATH export JAVA_HOME=/Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk1.7.0_45.jdk/Contents/Home/jre export M2_HOME=

Open Source as religion - when the Bazaar becomes a Cathedral

Steve Jones - Fri, 2014-06-27 09:00
The seminal book on Open Source development "Cathedral and the Bazaar" talks eloquently about the difference between commercial software development and open source development.  In the past few years however there has been another shift, a shift where companies are actively releasing their technology into Open Source as a competitive differentiation.  A claim of 'we are open' because the source
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Pivotal Cloud Foundry Installed lets create an ORG / USER to get started

Pas Apicella - Thu, 2014-06-26 18:16
I installed Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.2 recently and the commands below is what I run using the CLI to quickly create an ORG and a USER to get started with. Below assumes your connected as the ADMIN user to set a new ORG up.

Cloud Foundry CLI Commands as follows

cf api {cloud end point}
cf create-org pivotal
cf create-user pas pas
cf set-org-role pas pivotal OrgManager
cf target -o pivotal
cf create-space development
cf create-space test
cf create-space production
cf set-space-role pas pivotal production SpaceDeveloper
cf set-space-role pas pivotal development SpaceDeveloper
cf set-space-role pas pivotal test SpaceDeveloper
cf login -u pas -p pas -s developmenthttp://feeds.feedburner.com/TheBlasFromPas
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Announcing Fishbowl’s Technical Support Offerings for Oracle WebCenter

support_logo

Supporting an enterprise software system like Oracle WebCenter is no easy task. Technical complexities, customizations, and multiple versions make it difficult to resolve issues quickly and keep the system up and running. Without a dedicated and knowledgeable support team, WebCenter environments can suffer from system downtime, poor performance, and frustrated users.

Join Fishbowl Solutions for a webinar as they discuss their Oracle WebCenter technical support offerings. These offerings include specific technical services to support WebCenter administrators, end users, as well as customized environments. If you are a WebCenter administrator, power user, or an IT Director/Manager that oversees your company’s WebCenter environment, this webinar is for you. Come hear how Fishbowl’s support offerings could help you increase up-time, improve SR issue resolution, and ensure overall user satisfaction.

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

  • The reasons Fishbowl is best positioned to be your single point of contact for Oracle WebCenter technical support
  • What support services does Fishbowl offer and what does each include
  • The benefits Cascade Corporation has already realized with Fishbowl’s Enterprise Support offering for Oracle WebCenter

Date: Thursday, June 12th
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 PM EST, 12 – 1:00 PM CST

Register: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/941379506

 

The post Announcing Fishbowl’s Technical Support Offerings for Oracle WebCenter appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Telling Tales

Greg Pavlik - Sun, 2014-06-08 17:50
After struggling to find time for many months, I finally was able to sit down and watch without interruption Benjamin Bagby's Beowulf performance - an adaptation that relies on Bagby's voice and a reconstruction of a 6th century 6 tone Anglo-Saxon harp. The performance is engrossing and provokes a strong imaginative response, one that would have been communally experienced. Of course the only way to revive a sense of communal experience in the case of Bagby is to see him perform live - however, given the performance is entirely in Old English and as such most unintelligible without subtitles, I think a digital adaptation may be a necessary tradeoff. In many ways, Bagby's Beowulf is a reminder of how impoverished our notion of entertainment is - ephemeral, base, isolating and essentially throw away as a rule.

By the way, it's not entirely the case that the English are unable to create something of the same texture today - several times during the performance I thought of Judith Weir's one person, unaccompanied opera King Harald's Saga. Weir's work is much shorter, principally a musical composition and less poetically rich, so it is difficult to compare the two directly: Beowulf remains the provenance of a balladeer first and foremost, and this is a genre that more and more feels lost to our world - poetry today rarely seems to be meant to be read allowed and even more rarely follows epic formats. This is a lost social phenomena, for which we are impoverished: in fact, the last long work of a balladeer I read was Ethiopian Enzira Sebhat, itself a medieval work dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The closest - though only indirectly comparable - works to the Enzira Sebhat that I am aware of currently being composed are akathistos hymns of the Russian Orthodox tradition. And while many of those recent compositions are less-than-accomplished literary works, they unquestionably represent a rich and living and at times very beautiful means of transmission of communal memory and values. I am not aware of any recent akathistos compositions that have the expressive beauty and originality of the Byzantine hymnographer Romanos the Melodist, the modern akathist has sometimes proven a source of inspiration for exceptionally great art: the late Sir John Tavener's setting of the "thanksgiving akathist" being perhaps the most significant case in point.

Memories of the way we were...

Greg Pavlik - Sat, 2014-05-31 15:13
The fascinating thing about Hadoop is the obviousness of its evolutionary needs. For example, MapReduce coupled with reliable scale out storage was a powerful - even revolutionary - effect for organizations with both lots of and multi-structured data. Out of the gate, Hadoop unlocked data "applications" that were for all intents and purposes unimplementable. At the same time, it didn't take much imagination to see that separating the compute model from resource management would be essential for future applications that did not fit well with MapReduce itself. It took a lot of work and care to get YARN defined, implemented and hardened, but the need for YARN itself was fairly obvious. Now it is here and Hadoop is no longer about "batch" data processing.

Note, however, it takes a lot of work to make the evolutionary changes available. In some cases, bolt on solutions have emerged to fill the gap. For key value data management, HBase is a perfect example. Several years ago, Eric Baldeschwieler was pointing out that HDFS could have filled that role. I think he was right, but the time it would take to get "HBase-type" functionality implemented via HDFS would have been a very long path indeed. In that case, the community filled the gap with HBase and it is being "back integrated" into Hadoop via YARN in a way that will make for a happier co-existence.

Right now we are seeing multiple new bolt on attempts to add functionality to Hadoop. For example, there are projects to add MPP databases on top of Hadoop itself. It's pretty obvious that this is at best a stop gap again - and one that comes at a pretty high price - I don't know of anyone that seriously thinks that a bolt on MPP is ultimately the right model for the Hadoop ecosystem. Since the open source alternatives look to be several years away from being "production ready", that raises an interesting question: is Hadoop evolution moving ahead at a similar or even more rapid rate to provide a native solution - a solution that will be more scalable, more adaptive and more open to a wider range of use cases and applications - including alternative declarative languages and compute models?

I think the answer is yes: while SQL on Hadoop via Hive is really the only open source game in town for production use cases - and its gotten some amazing performance gains in the first major iteration on Tez that we'll talk more about in the coming days - its clear that the Apache communities are beginning to deliver a new series of building blocks for data management at scale and speed: Optiq's Cost Based Optimizer; Tez for structuring multi-node operator execution; ORC and vectorization for optimal storage and compute; HCat for DDL. But what's missing? Memory management. And man has it ever been missing - that should have been obvious as well (and it was - one reason that so many people are interested in Spark for efficient algorithm development).

What we've seen so far has been two extremes available when it comes to supporting memory management (especially for SQL) - all disk and all memory. An obvious point here is that neither is ultimately right for Hadoop. This is a long winded intro to point to two, interrelated pieces by Julian Hyde and Sanjay Radia unveiling a model that is being introduced across multiple components called Discardable In-memory Materialized Query (DIMMQ). Once you see this model, it becomes obvious that the future of Hadoop for SQL - and not just SQL - is being implemented in real time. Check out both blog posts:

http://hortonworks.com/blog/dmmq/

http://hortonworks.com/blog/ddm/


MDM isn't about data quality its about collaboration

Steve Jones - Tue, 2014-05-27 09:00
I'm going to state a sacrilegious position for a moment: the quality of data isn't a primary goal in Master Data Management Now before the perfectly correct 'Garbage In, Garbage Out' statement let me explain.  Data Quality is certainly something that MDM can help with but its not actually the primary aim of MDM. MDM is about enabling collaboration, collaboration is about the cross-reference
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Data Lakes will replace EDWs - a prediction

Steve Jones - Fri, 2014-05-23 14:14
Over the last few years there has been a trend of increased spending on BI, and that trend isn't going away.  The analyst predictions however have, understandably, been based on the mentality that the choice was between a traditional EDW/DW model or Hadoop.  With the new 'Business Data Lake' type of hybrid approach its pretty clear that the shift is underway for all vendors to have a hybrid
Categories: Fusion Middleware

A Framework Approach to Building an Oracle WebCenter Intranet, Extranet, or Portal

Whether you already have or are planning to build an Oracle WebCenter-based intranet, extranet or customer portal, its overall success hinges on its time to market, ability to scale, and the presence of user productivity tools. Attend this webinar to see how Fishbowl’s Portal Solution Accelerator (PSA) can provide an extensible framework that bundles reusable templates and page layouts, standards-based portlets, and in-place security administration. Join us to discover how this framework can be applied to build or improve your corporate intranet, partner extranet, or customer portal.

Date: Thursday, May 22nd
Time: 1:00 PM EST
Register: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/236838418

 

The post A Framework Approach to Building an Oracle WebCenter Intranet, Extranet, or Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Deep Dive: Oracle WebCenter Tips and Traps!

Bex Huff - Tue, 2014-04-08 17:26

I'm currently at IOUG Collaborate 2014 in Las Vegas, and I recently finished my 2-hour deep dive into WebCenter. I collected a bunch of tips & tricks in 5 different areas: metadata, contribution, consumption, security, and integrations:


Deep Dive: Oracle WebCenter Content Tips and Traps! from Brian Huff

As usual, a lot of good presentations this year, but the Collaborate Mobile App makes it a bit tough to find them...

Bezzotech will be at booth 1350, right by Oracle, be sure to swing by and register for a free iPad, or even a free consulting engagement!

read more

Categories: Fusion Middleware

This blog is now closed.

Billy Cripe - Mon, 2013-10-14 12:14

Thank you for visiting.  This blog has been closed down and merged with the WebCenter Blog, which contains blog posts and other information about ECM, WebCenter Content, the content-enabling of business applications and other relevant topics.  Please be sure to visit and bookmark https://blogs.oracle.com/webcenter/ and subscribe to stay informed about these topics and many more.   From there, use the #ECM hashtag to narrow your focus to topics that are strictly related to ECM.

See you there! 

Categories: Fusion Middleware

New Continuous Integration tutorial published

Lynn Munsinger - Mon, 2012-07-02 09:44
Hot off the press – a new continuous integration tutorial. It’s really not just about continuous integration, though! You’ll find it useful even if you aren’t using a continuous integration server like Hudson. It’s useful if you are doing any part of the scenario it documents: Setting up Team Productivity Center for your team and [...]

Advanced ADF eCourse, Part Deux

Lynn Munsinger - Tue, 2012-06-19 15:11
In February, we published the first in a series of FREE(!) online advanced ADF training: http://tinyurl.com/advadf-part1 The response to that course has been overwhelmingly positive as more and more people are moving past the evaluation/prototype stages with ADF and looking for more advanced topics. I’m pleased to relay the good news that the 2nd part [...]

Fun with Hudson, Part 1.1

Lynn Munsinger - Tue, 2012-06-05 09:19
Earlier I posted that I had used the following zip command in the ‘execute shell’ action for my Hudson build job: zip -r $WORKSPACE/builds/$JOB_NAME-$BUILD_NUMBER * -x ‘*/.svn/*’ -x ‘*builds/*’ This zips up the content of the exported source, so that I can send it on to team members who need the source of each build [...]

Hiring a Curriculum Developer

Lynn Munsinger - Tue, 2012-05-15 09:34
If you are an instructional designer with an eye for technologies like ADF, or if you are an ADF enthusiast and excel at creatively producing technical content, then ADF Product Management would like to hear from you. We’re looking for a curriculum developer to join our ADF Curriculum team, which is tasked with ensuring that [...]

Hiring a Curriculum Developer

Lynn Munsinger - Tue, 2012-05-15 09:34
If you are an instructional designer with an eye for technologies like ADF, or if you are an ADF enthusiast and excel at creatively producing technical content, then ADF Product Management would like to hear from you. We’re looking for a curriculum developer to join our ADF Curriculum team, which is tasked with ensuring that [...]

New ADF Insider on Layouts

Lynn Munsinger - Mon, 2012-03-26 13:22
I’ve published an ADF Insider session that helps de-mystify the ADF Faces components and how to work with them (and not against them), when building ADF applications. There’s also some great information on building ADF prototypes. Take a look here: http://download.oracle.com/otn_hosted_doc/jdeveloper/11gdemos/layouts/layouts.html

New ADF Insider on Layouts

Lynn Munsinger - Mon, 2012-03-26 13:22
I’ve published an ADF Insider session that helps de-mystify the ADF Faces components and how to work with them (and not against them), when building ADF applications. There’s also some great information on building ADF prototypes. Take a look here: http://download.oracle.com/otn_hosted_doc/jdeveloper/11gdemos/layouts/layouts.html