Fusion Middleware

Making DevOps Business Driven - a service view

Steve Jones - Wed, 2015-01-28 08:59
I've been doing a bit recently around DevOps and what I've been seeing is that companies that having been scaling DevOps tend to run into a problem: exactly what is a good boundary for a DevOps team? Now I've talked before about how Microservices are just SOA with a new logo, well there is an interesting piece about DevOps as well, its not actually a brand new thing.  Its an evolution and
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Big Data and the importance of Meta-Data

Steve Jones - Tue, 2015-01-20 09:00
Data isn't really respected in businesses, you can see that because unlike other corporate assets there is rarely a decent corporate catalog that shows what exists and who has it.  In the vast majority of companies there is more effort and automation put into tracking laptops than there is into cataloging and curating information. Historically we've sort of been able to get away with this
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Security Big Data - Part 7 - a summary

Steve Jones - Thu, 2015-01-15 09:00
Over six parts I've gone through a bit of a journey on what Big Data Security is all about. Securing Big Data is about layers Use the power of Big Data to secure Big Data How maths and machine learning helps Why its how you alert that matters Why Information Security is part of Information Governance Classifying Risk and the importance of Meta-Data The fundamental point here is that
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Securing Big Data Part 6 - Classifying risk

Steve Jones - Tue, 2015-01-13 09:00
So now your Information Governance groups consider Information Security to be important you have to then think about how they should be classifying the risk.  Now there are docs out there on some of these which talk about frameworks.  British Columbia's government has one for instance that talks about High, Medium and Low risk, but for me that really misses the point and over simplifies the
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Securing Big Data Part 5 - your Big Data Security team

Steve Jones - Mon, 2015-01-12 09:00
What does your security team look like today? Or the IT equivalent, "the folks that say no".  The point is that in most companies information security isn't actually something that is considered important.  How do I know this?  Well because basically most IT Security teams are the equivalent of the nightclub bouncers, they aren't the people who own the club, they aren't as important as the
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Securing Big Data - Part 4 - Not crying Wolf.

Steve Jones - Fri, 2015-01-09 09:00
In the first three parts of this I talked about how Securing Big Data is about layers, and then about how you need to use the power of Big Data to secure Big Data, then how maths and machine learning helps to identify what is reasonable and was is anomalous. The Target Credit Card hack highlights this problem.  Alerts were made, lights did flash.  The problem was that so many lights flashed and
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Securing Big Data - Part 3 - Security through Maths

Steve Jones - Thu, 2015-01-08 09:00
In the first two parts of this I talked about how Securing Big Data is about layers, and then about how you need to use the power of Big Data to secure Big Data.  The next part is "what do you do with all that data?".   This is where Machine Learning and Mathematics comes in, in other words its about how you use Big Data analytics to secure Big Data. What you want to do is build up a picture of
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Securing Big Data - Part 2 - understanding the data required to secure it

Steve Jones - Wed, 2015-01-07 09:00
In the first part of Securing Big Data I talked about the two different types of security.  The traditional IT and ACL security that needs to be done to match traditional solutions with an RDBMS but that is pretty much where those systems stop in terms of security which means they don't address the real threats out there, which are to do with cyber attacks and social engineering.  An ACL is only
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Securing Big Data - Part 1

Steve Jones - Tue, 2015-01-06 09:00
As Big Data and its technologies such as Hadoop head deeper into the enterprise so questions around compliance and security rear their heads. The first interesting point in this is that it shows the approach to security that many of the Silicon Valley companies that use Hadoop at scale have taken, namely pretty little really.  It isn't that protecting information has been seen as a massively
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Uber won't want drivers in the future

Steve Jones - Tue, 2014-10-14 10:30
I'm an Uber user, its a great service outside of cities with decent public transport.  But I have been thinking about where they will justify the $17bn valuation and give people a return on that $1.2bn investment.  At the same time I've been following the autonomous car pieces with interest and I think there is a pretty clear way this can end, especially as Uber have already said they are going
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3 film non-meme

Greg Pavlik - Sun, 2014-09-21 16:09
Riffing off previous post - was discussing with my wife last evening what we thought the three best "recent" films we had seen were. Here's my list:

1) Jia Zhangke's A Touch of Sin.

Reason: this is a powerful, powerful film that explores the effects of radical individualism, and economic inequality and of the overturning of normal, local, rooted communities. Banned by the Chinese government, it is as much a critique of the values of neoliberalism globally as it is of the current Chinese economic experiment.

2) Alejandro González Iñárritu's Biutiful.

Reason: a moving exploration of responsibility and ethics in the face of poverty, hopelessness and impending death. What do we make of the human spirit and our obligations to each other - and our obligations in the face of The Other?  Javier Bardem was birthed for this role - fantastic acting.

3) Pavel Lungin's The Island.

Reason: who is guilty before whom and for what? Take a director of Jewish background, give him a story that is loosely inspired by a hagiography of the fool-for-Christ Feofil of the Kieven Caves, and cast a retired-rock-star-current-recluse (Pyotr Mamonov) as a Orthodox monastic in the far north of Russia, and I would have quite low expectations for the outcome. What Lungin produced is instead not only his best film but I think one of the best films of the last 20 years.

Top 10 Book Meme

Greg Pavlik - Tue, 2014-09-16 11:48
What books have most impacted me? I picked books I have returned to over and over. Yes, I know this is solipsistic to publish, but its a fascinating thing to think through. I'm sure the list will not look right in a few months anyway. But here I go...

1 The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Reason: the best book ever written about the human condition.

2 Iob, LXX
Reason: bad things happen to good people, quite often.

3 I Am a Cat, Natsume Soseki
Reason: comedy is good for the soul. This is the funniest book I've ever read. Cheating here, but I'd probably add Gogol as a next choice.

4 The Symposium, Plato
Reason: love. And I'm an only partially reconstructed platonist.

5 Demons, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Reason: explains a big part of the 20th century. Makes 1984 look like crude propaganda.

6 Also Spracht Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche
Reason: Nietszche saw the enormity of the modern project clearly.

7 Life of Moses, Gregory of Nyssa
Reason: before structuralism, post structuralism, semiotics, and deconstruction, there was Gregory of Nyssa. And apokatastasis.

8 For the Time Being, WH Auden
Reason: aside from the fact that Auden is the best English language poet, this is a deeply moving meditation on Christmas in the anglophone experience. Read it several times each winter.

9 The Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri
Reason: great art meets allegory meets beauty in the search for meaning. Honestly, stuck with only one book this might be it.

10 Faust, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Reason: we are all compromised to one degree or another.

Test your WebLogic 12.1.3 enviroment with Robot

Edwin Biemond - Sun, 2014-08-10 12:42
Robot Framework is a generic test automation framework which has an easy-to-use tabular test data syntax and it utilizes the keyword-driven testing approach. This means we can write our tests in readable and understandable text. If we combine this with the REST Management interface of WebLogic 12.1.3 we are able to test every detail of a WebLogic domain configuration and when we combine this

Create with WLST a SOA Suite, Service Bus 12.1.3 Domain

Edwin Biemond - Thu, 2014-08-07 14:14
When you want to create a 12.1.3 SOA Suite, Service Bus Domain, you have to use the WebLogic config.sh utility.  The 12.1.3 config utility is a big improvement when you compare this to WebLogic 11g. With this I can create some complex cluster configuration without any after configuration. But if you want to automate the domain creation and use it in your own (provisioning) tool/script then you

Whistler, Microsoft and how far cloud has come

Steve Jones - Thu, 2014-08-07 10:00
In six years Microsoft has come from almost zero corporate knowledge about how cloud computing works to it being an integral part of their strategy.  Sure back in early 2008 there were some pieces of Microsoft that knew about cloud but that really wasn't a corporate view it was what a very few people inside the company knew. How do I know this? Well back in 2008 I was sitting on the top of a
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Test your Application with the WebLogic Maven plugin

Edwin Biemond - Thu, 2014-07-31 06:47
In this blogpost I will show you how easy it is to add some unit tests to your application when you use Maven together with the 12.1.3 Oracle software ( like WebLogic , JDeveloper or Eclipse OEPE). To demonstrate this, I will create a RESTful Person Service in JDeveloper 12.1.3 which will use the Maven project layout. We will do the following: Create a Project and Application based on a Maven

Silence

Greg Pavlik - Sat, 2014-07-26 11:26
Silence. Sometimes sought after, but in reality almost certainly feared - the absence of not just sound but voice. Silence is often associated with divine encounter - the neptic tradition of the Philokalia comes to mind - but also and perhaps more accurately with abandonment, divine or otherwise. I recently read Shusaku Endo's Silence, a remarkable work, dwelling on the theme of abandonment in the context of the extirpation of Kakure Kirishitan communities in Tokagawa Japan. Many resilient families survived and eventually came out of hiding in the liberalization in the mid-19th century, but the persecutions were terrible. Their story is deeply moving (sufficiently so that over time I find myself drawn to devotion to the image of Maria-Kannon). Endo's novel was not without controversy but remains one of the great literary accomplishments of the 20th century.

In fact, the reason for this post is a kind of double entendre on silence: the relative silence in literate western circles with respect to Japanese literature of the past century. Over the last month, I realized that virtually no one I had spoken with had read a single Japanese novel. Yet, like Russia of the 19th century, Japan produced a concentration of great writers and great novelists in the last 20th century that is set apart: the forces of of profound national changes (and defeat) created the crucible of great art. That art carries the distinctive aesthetic sense of Japan - a kind of openness of form, but is necessarily the carrier of universal, humanistic themes.

Endo is a writer in the post war period - the so-called third generation, and in my view the last of the wave of great Japanese literature. Read him. But don't stop - perhaps don't start - there. The early 20th century work of Natsume Soseki are a product of the Meiji period. In my view, Soseki is not only a father of Japenese literature but one of the greatest figures of world literature taken as a whole - I am a Cat remains one of my very favorite novels. Two troubling post-war novels by Yukio Mishima merit attention - Confessions of a Mask and the Sailor Who Fell From Grace with the Sea, both I would characterize broadly as existential masterpieces. The topic of identity in the face of westernization is also a moving theme in Osamu Dazai's No Longer Human. I hardly mean this as a complete survey - something in any case I am not qualified to provide -just a pointer toward something broader and important.

My encounter with contemporary Japanese literature - albeit limited - has been less impactful (I want to like Haruki Murakami in the same way I want to like Victor Pelevin, but both make me think of the distorted echo of something far better). And again like Russia, it is difficult to know what to make of Japan today - where its future will lead, whether it will see a cultural resurgence or decline. It is certain that its roots are deep and I hope she finds a way to draw on them and to flourish.


Spark: A Discussion

Greg Pavlik - Wed, 2014-07-23 09:36
A great presentation, worth watching in its entirety.

With apologies to my Hadoop friends but this is good for you too.

Exactly Wrong

Greg Pavlik - Mon, 2014-07-21 09:58
I normally avoid anything that smacks of a competitive discussion on what I consider to be a space for personal reflection. So while I want to disclose the fact that I am not disinterested in the points I am making from a professional standpoint, my main interest is to frame some architecture points that I think are extremely important for the maturation and success of the Hadoop ecosystem.

A few weeks back, Mike Olson of Cloudera spoke at Spark Summit on how Spark relates to the future of Hadoop. The presentation can be found here:

http://youtu.be/8kcdwnbHnJo

In particular I want to draw attention to the statement made at 1:45 in the presentation that describes Spark as the "natural successor to MapReduce" - it becomes clear very quickly that what Olson is talking about is batch processing. This is fascinating as everyone I've talked to immediately points out one obvious thing: Spark isn't a general purpose batch processing framework - that is not its design center. The whole point of Spark is to enable fast data access and interactivity.
 
The guys that clearly "get" Spark - unsurprisingly - are DataBricks. In talking with Ion and company, it's clear they understand the use cases where Spark shines - data scientist driven data exploration and algorithmic development, machine learning, etc. - things that take advantage of the memory mapping capabilities and speed of the framework. And they have offered an online service that allows users to rapidly extract value from cloud friendly datasets, which is smart.

Cloudera's idea of pushing SQL, Pig and other frameworks on to Spark is actually a step backwards - it is a proposal to recreate all the problems of MapReduce 1: it fails to understand the power of refactoring resource management away from the compute model. Spark would have to reinvent and mature models for multi-tenancy, resource managemnet, scheduling, security, scaleout, etc that are frankly already there today for Hadoop 2 with YARN.

The announcement of an intent to lead an implementation of Hive on Spark got some attention. This was something that I looked at carefully with my colleagues almost 2 years ago, so I'd like to make a few observations on why we didn't take this path then.

The first was maturity, in terms of the Spark implementation, of Hive itself, and Shark. Candidly, we knew Hive itself worked at scale but needed significant enhancement and refactoring for both new features on the SQL front and to work at interactive speeds. And we wanted to do all this in a way that did not compromise Hive's ability to work at scale - for real big data problems. So we focused on the mainstream of Hive and the development of a Dryad like runtime for optimal execution of operators in physical plans for SQL in a way that meshed deeply with YARN. That model took the learnings of the database community and scale out big data solutions and built on them "from the inside out", so to speak.

Anyone who has been tracking Hadoop for, oh, the last 2-3 years will understand intuitively the right architectural approach needs to be based on YARN. What I mean is that the query execution must - at the query task level - be composed of tasks that are administered directly by YARN. This is absolutely critical for multi-workload systems (this is one reason why a bolt on MPP solution is a mistake for Hadoop - it is at best a tactical model while the system evolves).  This is why we are working with the community on Tez, a low level framework for enabling YARN native domain specific execution engines. For Hive-on-Tez, Hive is the engine and Tez provides the YARN level integration for resource negotiation and coorindation for DAG execution: a DAG of native operators analogous the the execution model found in the MPP world (when people compare Tez and Spark, they are fundamentally confused - Spark could be run on Tez for example for a much deeper integration with Hadoop 2 for example). This model allows the full range of use cases from interactive to massive batch to be administered in a deeply integrated, YARN native way.

Spark will undoubtedly mature into a great tool for what it is designed for: in memory, interactive scenarios - generally script driven - and likely grow to subsume new use cases we aren't anticipating today. It is, however, exactly the wrong choice for scale out big data batch processing in anything like the near term; worse still, returning to a monolithic general purpose compute framework for all Hadoop models would be a huge regression and is a disastrously bad idea.

Dependent Rational Animals

Greg Pavlik - Sun, 2014-07-20 17:32
I wanted to briefly comment on Alisdair MacIntyre's lectures collected as "Dependent Rational Animals", but let me precede that with a couple of comments for context: first, as I alluded in my last post referencing Levinas, it is my view that the the ethics demands a certain primacy in any healthy conception of life and society; second, in the area of ethics, Macintyre's After Virtue is the book that has had perhaps the biggest impact on my own thinking.

One of the criticisms of MacIntyre is that his critique of rational ethics is, on the one hand, devastating; on the other hand, his positive case for working out a defense of his own position - a revivification of social ethics in the Aristotelian-Thomist tradition(s) was somewhat pro forma. I think this is legitimate in so far as it relates to After Virtue itself (I believe I have read the latest edition - 3 - most recently), though I am not enough of a MacIntyre expert to offer a defensible critique of his work overall.

I do, however, want to draw attention to Dependent Rational Animals specifically in this light. Here MacIntyre begins with is the position of human as animal - as a kind of naturalist starting point for developing another pass at the importance of the tradition of the virtues. What is most remarkable is that in the process of exploring the implications of our "animality" MacIntyre manages to subvert yet another trajectory of twentieth century philosophy, this time as it relates to the primacy of linguistics. The net effect is to restore philosophical discourse back toward the reality of the human condition in the context of the broader evolutionary context of life on earth without - and this I must say is the most amazing part of this book - resorting to fables-masked-as-science (evolutionary psychology).

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