Shay Shmeltzer

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Updated: 15 hours 32 min ago

Date Calculations and Queries with Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Fri, 2017-11-17 12:10

It's very easy to define a field in a custom object in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service to store a date, but when it comes to doing calculations and queries based on this date you'll find that you need to resort to a little bit of JavaScript calculations.

Here are a couple of useful things to know if you are trying to do that.

Calculating Age (or time passed from a date in years)

Let's assume you are storing information about employees and one of the pieces of information you have is their date of birth - the Birthday field in the image below.

How do you show their actual age in years on a page?

You can define a calculated field in your business object - and have VBCS use the "calculate value with formula" as the source for this field.

Your formula would be something like:

(new Date() -new Date($birthdate) )/ (60*60*24*1000*365)

You are calculating the difference between today's date and the birthday field and since the answer is in milliseconds you convert it to years by dividing by the number of milliseconds in a year.

Note that as you type in your formula the dialog shows you the results of the formula below the formula field - quite useful to verify that you are doing it right.

Now your page can show the age of your employees:

Filtering Based on Date

What if you wanted to limit the records shown in the table above to only show employees of a specific age?

The tricky part is that you'll need to do the calculation against the birthday field and not against the age field. The age field is not actually stored anywhere - rather it is calculated on the fly.

Let's take the table shown above and assume we want to limit it to show employees who are younger than 9 years. To do that we'll add a query condition to our table to check that the birthday is larger than the date of (today - 9 years).

The calculation of the date 9 years ago will be with a formula like this:

new Date($current_date-9*365*24*60*60*1000)

Now your table only shows older employees.

Want to have a more dynamic way to define the query criteria - you can adopt the approach I showed in the blog about Creating Custom Search/Query Pages with Visual Builder along with the techniques shown here.

One last note - since not every year has 365 days - the calculation for milliseconds conversion is not completely accurate - but it is quite close.

Categories: Development

Conditional Navigation based on Queries in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Wed, 2017-11-15 13:21

A couple of threads on the Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service forum asked about writing code in buttons in VBCS that compares values entered in a page to data in business objects and perform conditional navigation based on the values. In a past blog I showed the code needed for querying VBCS objects from the UI, but another sample never hurts, so here is another demo...

For this demo I'm going to show how to do it in a login flow - assuming you have a business object that keeps usernames and passwords, and you want to develop a page where a user types a user/pass combination and you need to verify that this is indeed a valid combination that exist in the business object.

(In reality, if you want to do user authentication in VBCS - you should use the built in security frameworks and not code it this way. I'm just using this as an example.)

Here is a quick video of the working app - with pointers to the components detailed below.

The first thing you'll do is create the business object that hosts the user/pass combination - note that in the video since "user" is a reserved word - the ID for the field is actually "user_" - which is what we'll use in our code later on.

 

Next you'll want to create a new page where people can insert a user/pass combination - to do that create a new page of type "Create" - this page will require you to associate it with a business object, so create a new business object. We won't actually keep data in this new business object. In the video and the code - this business object is called "query".

Now design your page and add the user and pass fields - creating parallel fields in the query business object (quser and qpass in the video). You can then remove the "Save" button that won't be use, and instead add a "validate" button.

For this new button we'll define a new custom action that will contain custom JavaScript code. Custom code should return either a success state - using resolve(); - or failure - using reject();

Based on the success or failure you can define the next action in the flow - in our case we are showing either a success or error message:

success flow

Now lets look at the custom JavaScript code:

require(['operation/js/api/Conditions', 'operation/js/api/Operator'], function (Conditions, Operator) { var eo = Abcs.Entities().findById('Users'); var passid = eo.getProperty('pass'); var userid = eo.getProperty('user_'); var condition = Conditions.AND( Conditions.SIMPLE(passid, Operator.EQUALS,$QueryEntityDetailArchetypeRecord.getValue('qpass') ), Conditions.SIMPLE(userid, Operator.EQUALS, $QueryEntityDetailArchetypeRecord.getValue('quser')) ); var operation = Abcs.Operations().read( { entity : eo, condition : condition }); operation.perform().then(function (operationResult) { if (operationResult.isSuccess()) { operationResult.getData().forEach(function (oneRecord) { resolve("ok"); }); } reject("none"); } ). catch (function (operationResult) { if (operationResult.isFailure()) { // Insert code you want to perform if fetching of records failed alert('didnt worked'); reject("error"); } }); });

Explaining the code:

  • Lines 2-4 - getting the pointers to the business object and the fields in it using their field id.
  • Lines 5-8 - defining a condition with AND - referencing the values of the fields on the page
  • Lins 9-11 - defining the operation to read data with the condition from the business object
  • Line 12 - executing the read operation
  • Line 14-18 - checking if a record has been returned and if it has then we are ok to return success - there was a user/pass combination matching the condition.
  • Line 19 - otherwise we return with a failure.

One recommendation, while coding JavaScript - use a good code editor that will help highlight open/close brackets matches - it would save you a lot of time.

For more on the VBCS JavaScript API that you can use for accessing business components see the doc.

Categories: Development

Introduction to Oracle Developer Cloud Service Issue Tracking REST Interfaces

Mon, 2017-11-06 13:38

The task tracking system in Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) helps your team manage your development priorities and process. DevCS offers a simple web interface for working with the system. However, in some cases you might want to build your own interfaces to interact with the issues. For example, you might want to build a system for end-users to report bugs in your app and you don't want to give them direct access to the DevCS web insterface. In the August 17 update of DevCS  we introduced a set of REST services that will let you build a custom interface that will interact with our issues repository.

The official documentation for the DevCS REST services is here.

I wanted to share some tips to help you get this going in your project. The results are in this short video demo, and the details are below.

Figuring Out The End Points

The documentation gives you the basic end-points you should be calling, but it took me a little bit of time to figure out the full URL to the end point. Turns out the URL is composed in the following way:

https://server/org-id/rest/org-id+project-id/issues/v2/issues

The first parts (server/org-id) are quite easy to get - just copy it from the URL of your project when you look at it in your browser.

The org-id+project-id part is something you can get by looking at the details of your maven repository URL - see the image below - what you are looking for is the part before the /maven/ at the end:

Note that in some projects this will also include a numeric value appended to the project name. Something like developer-oracletemplates_db-oss-devops_20266.

In the video sample below the result URL for the REST that returns the list of issues currently in the system ended up being:

https://myserver/developer-oracletemplates/rest/developer-oracletemplates_adf1221/issues/v2/issues

Creating New Issues

One of the useful services is the /issues/v2/issues/create-form service. It returns a json file that you can edit to specify information about a new task that you want to create.

Note that the file start with : {"createIssue":{"links":.... Before you use the file to insert a new issue, you'll need to remove the  {"createIssue": at the start and the corresponding } at the end of the file. Only then can you use it to submit the POST operation to create an issue.

In the video I used the following command to create the issue in the DevCS:

curl -X POST -u shay@oracle.com https://myserver/developer-oracletemplates/rest/developer-oracletemplates_adf1221/issues/v2/issues/ -d@issue.json -H 'Content-type:application/json'

(the -d allows you to specify the name of the file with the new issue, and the -H specifies the content format).

Now that you have access to the information you can create new systems on top of it using your favorite development tool. At the end of the video you can see a simple issue system I built with Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service - more on that in a future blog entry.

 

Categories: Development

Exporting and Importing Data from Visual Builder Cloud Service - with REST Calls

Thu, 2017-11-02 16:37

Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) makes it very easy to create custom objects to store your data. A frequent request we get is for a way to load and export data from these business objects. As John blogged, we added a feature to support doing this through the command line - John's blog shows you the basic options for the command line.

I recently needed to do this for a customer, and thought I'll share some tips that helped me get the functionality working properly - in case others need some help skipping bumps in the road.

Here is a demo showing both import and export and how to get them to work.

Exporting Data

Export is quite simple - you use a GET operation on a REST service, the command line for calling this using curl will look like this:

curl -u user:password https://yourserver/design/ExpImp/1.0/resources/datamgr/export > exp.zip

The result is a streaming of a zip file, so I just added a > exp.zip file to the command's end. The zip file will contain CSV files for each object in your application.

Don't forget to replace the bold things with your values for username and password, your VBCS server name and the name of the app you are using (ExpImp in my case).

Importing Data

Having the exported CSV file makes it easy to build a CSV file for upload - in the demo I just replaced and added values in that file. Next you'll use a similar curl command to call a POST method. It will look like this:

curl -X POST -u user:password https://yourserver/design/ExpImp/1.0/resources/datamgr/import/Employee?filename=Employee.csv -H "Origin:https://yourserver" -H "Content-Type:text/csv" -T Employee.csv -v

A few things to note.

You need to specify which object you want to import into (Employee after the /import/ in the command above), and you also need to provide a filename parameter that tell VBCS which file to import.

In the current release you need to work around a CORS security limitation - this is why we are adding a header (with the -H option) that indicate that we are sending this from the same server as the one we are running on. In an upcoming version this won't be needed.

We use the -T option to attach the csv file to our call.

Note that you should enable the "Enable basic authentication for business object REST APIs" security option for the application (Under Application Settings->Security). 

Using Import in Production Apps

In the samples above we imported and exported into an application that is still being developed - this is why we used the /design/ in our REST path.

If you want to execute things on an application that you published then replace the /design/ with /deployment/ 

One special note about live applications, before you import data into them you'll need to lock them. You can do this from the home page of VBCS and the drop down menu on the application.

 

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Categories: Development

Using Flyway to Manage Oracle DB Versions in the Cloud

Thu, 2017-10-19 13:11

This is another entry in my series about managing database scripts/schema as part of agile development. In the past I showed how to use simple SQL and Liquibase to manage schema creation/population scripts, and today I'll show you how to use Flyway.

Flyway log

Flyway is a free open source solution for managing "database migrations" - or basically helping you keep multiple database in synch by tracking and applying changes to the schema structure and data.

Flyway uses simple SQL scripts - which means you can use DB specific syntax - and tracks their execution in the database through a table it maintains. It is very easy to get started with and only has 6 commands that you need to be familiar with.

The main command is "migrate" which will check your database status, and then run all the newer scripts that have yet to be run on that instance.

Flyway uses a directory structure that contains a sql folder where you'll host all your SQL scripts. It uses a naming convention (that can be adjusted) where you start the file name with a Version number (V1, V1.1, V2.1) and then two "_" followed by a description - so something like V1__Create_Emp_Table - will show up as "Create Emp Table" when you issue the "info" command to find out what is the status of a database and which scripts have already run. By the way, the info command will also show you which new scripts are pending to be run on a specific database instance.

In the video below I show how to configure and use Flyway, and how to integrate it into an automatic DevOps process leveraging Oracle Developer Cloud Service. (including task tracking, Git version management of the source, and build execution of the scripts).

Flyway can integrate with various build framework (ant, maven, gradle etc), but since many DB folks are not familiar with those, I chose to use simple command lines in my demo to invoke Flyway. On my laptop and local MySQL DB I just used the Flyway command line utility. However Flyway is not installed by default in the DevCS servers, so I did a little trick:

Flyway is a Java program, so into my DevCS Git repository I uploaded the Flyway directory along with needed jars for flyway and the JDBC driver. Then I looked at the script for invoking the command line and found out the Java command they used and copied it into a regular shell command in my build:

java -cp lib/flyway-commandline-4.2.0.jar:lib/flyway-core-4.2.0.jar org.flywaydb.commandline.Main info -user=fw -password=$Password -url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@ipaddress:1521/servicename

The $Password refers to a build parameter which is encrypted.

The directory structure and files in my Git are shown in this image:

directory structure

 

Categories: Development

Introduction to Liquibase and Managing Your Database Source Code

Mon, 2017-10-16 10:35

In previous posts I showed how you can manage SQL scripts lifecycle with the help of Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) as part of an overall Oracle DB DevOps solution. I wanted to add one more utility that might act as an alternative or addition to the SQL script managing - Liquibase.

Liquibase logo

Liquibase is an open source solution for managing revisions of your databse schema scripts. It works across various types of databases, and supports various file formats for defining the DB structure. The feature that is probably most attractive in Liquibase is its ability to roll changes back and forward from a specific point - saving you from the need to know what was the last change/script you ran on a specific DB instance.

Liquibase uses scripts - referred to as "changesets" - to manage the changes you do to your DB. The changesets files can be in various formats including XML, JSON, YAML, and SQL. In the examples below I'm using the XML format.

As you continue to change an enhance your DB structure through the development lifecycle you'll add more changesets. A master file lists all the changeset files (or the directories where they are). In parallel Liquibase tracks in your database which changesets have already run. 

When you issue a liquibase update command, liquibase looks at the current state of your DB, and identifies which changes have already happened. Then it run the rest of the changes - getting you to the latest revision of the structure you are defining.

By integrating Liquibase into your overall code version management system and continuous integration platform you can synch up your database versions with your app version. In my case this would of course mean integration with Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) - which you get for free with the Oracle Database Cloud Service. In the video below I show a flow that covers:

  • Tracking my DBA tasks in the issue system
  • Modifying a local MySQL DB with Liquibase (doing forward and backward rolls)
  • Adding a change set defining a new table
  • Committing to Git
  • Automatic build implementing the changes in Oracle Database Cloud Service
  • Automatic testing with UT/PLSQL

Here is a quick 10 minute demo:

For those who want to try and replicate this, here are some resources:

A changeset that creates a "department" table with three columns:

A changeset that creates PL/SQL function, package and procedure. Note that in line 3 the dbms="oracle" means this script will only run when we are connected to an Oracle DB:

create or replace function betwnstr( a_string varchar2, a_start_pos integer, a_end_pos integer ) return varchar2 is begin return substr( a_string, a_start_pos, a_end_pos - a_start_pos+1 ); end; create or replace package test_betwnstr as -- %suite(Between string function) -- %test(Returns substring from start position to end position) procedure basic_usage; end; create or replace package body test_betwnstr as procedure basic_usage is begin ut.expect( betwnstr( '1234567', 2, 5 ) ).to_equal('2345'); end; end; A changeset that adds a record to a table. Line 8 has the rollback tag that defines how to do a rollback for this insert: delete from department where id=20

 

A few tips about my DevCS project and build setup.

1. For the sake of simplicity, I loaded the liquibase and JDBC jar files into my git repository - this makes it easy for my build steps to find the files and execute them. I'm guessing you could also use Maven to host those.

2. I use a password parameter for my build so I don't need to hardcode the password adding a bit of security to my build. Reference teh parameter in your build with a $ sign - $password

3. Want to learn more about test automation with ut/PLSQL - check out this blog entry.

 

 

Categories: Development

Creating Custom Search/Query Pages with Visual Builder

Fri, 2017-09-15 10:39

There is built in functionality in Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) that will let you attach an advanced filter to any table. This will give you the ability to define complex searches.

However, sometime people would want to create their own custom query pages. For example the default filter for a field searches for a letter in any place in the field - and maybe you just want to search for the first letter. Or maybe you want to display a nice selection list for filtering. There is a little trick that will let you achieve this, and I show it in the video:

The basic steps involve creating a new edit page with a new dummy business object. Then you add a table that is based on the real business object (the one with the data), and hook up the query of this table to the values of fields from the dummy business object. Then you add a button to do a "fetch all" on the table, and you are done.

At the end of the video you'll also see how to hook this page into your main menu.

Categories: Development

A Guide to Attending Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne for Free

Thu, 2017-09-14 11:32

This title seems like a click bait, but I'll try and show you that this is actually possible. (Especially if you act fast).

A pass to both conferences is not a cheap item, and with training budgets shrinking you might be running into problems getting approval to expense this to your company. But here are a couple of tricks you can use to get free access to OOW/JavaOne. Some would get you a full pass and some will get you into specific areas and sessions.

Full Pass

Be a Speaker

Well we are a bit late to the call for papers at this point, but you might still be able to become a co-speaker if you have a good customer story to tell that shows how you are using the product/technology that a talk is about. Oracle is always looking to feature customer stories in our sessions - it is always better when a customer shares their real live success. Look up the content catalog and locate sessions on products that you are successfully implementing - ping the speaker and they might want to add you as a co-speaker.

Apply for the Oracle Excellence Awards

We are late for getting in this year, but keep an eye for this for next year. Winners get a free pass to OOW. Details here.

JavaOne Special Discount

Right now you can get 50% off your JavaOne ticket price if you use this code DJFS2017. Register here https://www.oracle.com/javaone/register.html

Other Passes

So full pass might be hard to get for free, but you can get in on a big chunk of the action for free using 

The Discoverer pass

A Discoverer pass lets you into the exhibit halls and various keynotes. Getting into the exhibit hall is great if you want to meet product managers and learn about the latest versions (and upcoming versions too). Most of the PMs are going to do shifts at the Oracle Demoground in their product pods - so hang out there and you'll be able to chat with us.

Usually a Discoverer pass is $75 - but since you are reading this blog, you can get one for free - use the code CDFR2017. Register here.

Oracle Code

Want to get into some technical sessions - this year we are bringing Oracle Code back to San Francisco during OOW - and you can get into this part of the conference for free. Reg here:

https://developer.oracle.com/code/sanfrancisco-oct-2017

See you at the conference in a couple of weeks.

 

 

 

Categories: Development

Sending Emails from Visual Builder Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-09-11 12:23

Sending emails as a result of some changes to data is a common requirement we've been hearing from customers of Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS). In previous versions we already added a function that allows you to fire up the client email software from your app. In the new version we rolled out a couple of weeks ago we added a new function that can manage the whole email processing inside VBCS - on the backend/server/cloud side.

When you define a new trigger on a business object you now have the option to add "send email notification" step to your logic flow. 

When you are defining this, you'll be able to pick or define a template for your email. The email template can have parameters to increase reusability. These parameters can then have their value set from expressions that can include values of fields from your objects.

Here is a complete demo video that shows you how to add an email notification to an event on your business object:

Categories: Development

Advanced Code Search for Git in Oracle Developer Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-07-10 07:11

One of the new features introduced in a recent monthly update of Oracle Developer Cloud Service is the advanced code search box you can see at the top right when you look at your Git repositories. This is a separate search functionality from the regular project artifacts search the box does in the other section of DevCS.

search screen

This search functionality is language aware, supporting a variety of languages including Java, JavaScript, HTML and CSS. It scans and indexes your code to understand its structure. DevCS can then do context aware searches for objects in your code, providing you autosuggest and even supporting camelCasing in the search box.

In the short video below I show you how this works. I start by importing code from a random github project into DevCS - and then I perform a search and show you how to find out the files, lines of code & revision references to your search term. You'll also see how code navigation works in the browser.

For more information about this capability have a look at the documentation here.

 

Categories: Development

How Do I Start Learning Oracle ADF - The 12c Edition

Fri, 2017-06-30 17:42

The most popular blog entry on my blog has been the "How do I start Learning ADF" entry for years now. That entry however was last updated in 2012 (and written in 2010) - so I figured it is time to give it another update, point to more recent resources, fix broken links, and cover additional resources that appeared over the years.

So here is the ADF 12c version of that blog entry updated for 2017:

Get started with Oracle ADF in 6 steps

Step 1 - Learn Basic Java

Oracle ADF aims to reduce the amount of coding you need to do for a lot of the tasks you'll need for building an application, and if you follow some of the tutorials mentioned later you'll see how you can build advanced apps without coding. But, at the end of the day, you will write code when developing with ADF - and that code would be written in Java. You don't have to be a Java ninja to work in ADF, but you should be familiar with basic language concepts and constructs.

There are lots of resources out there that will teach you the language (by the way if you are on ADF 12.2.* you should learn the Java/JDK 8 syntax), one option is the Oracle Java Tutorials path. Searching online you'll be able to find many other resources for this task. Since Oracle ADF is based on Java EE architecture - you might want to also get a bit of understanding of that architecture - but don't worry about learning all of Java EE in details - ADF will make it much simpler for you.

While learning the language you should be practicing it with the development tool that you are going to use, if you are going to developer Oracle ADF applications then that tool will be Oracle JDeveloper. Get yourself familiar with the basic IDE features for coders by running through this IDE tutorial.

Step 2 - Get started with Oracle ADF

Now that you know the basics of the Java language (and maybe some Java EE concepts), it's time to start using the framework that will simplify your life. Start by reading the data sheet and technical paper to understand what ADF is all about.

Now get your hands dirty by completing the Overview tutorial for Oracle ADF - this will take you a couple of hours but by the end of it you'll have built a full blown application, and you will touch on most of the parts of the Oracle ADF architecture.

Two other tutorials you should do next will deepen your knowledge about the Oracle ADF Controller Layer and taskflows, and the Oracle ADF Faces UI layer. If you got more time, have a run through other tutorials from our site.

Step 3 - Getting Educated

Now that you have hands-on experience with Oracle ADF, it would be a good point to go and get some deeper knowledge about how the framework works. You can leverage the collection of free online lessons we recorded in the ADF Essentials channel. You don't have to watch all the videos, but I would definitely recommend that at a minimum you'll watch the overview, ADF business components, ADF Controller (both parts) and ADF Faces video. And then you must watch the video about the ADF bindings internal seminars (2 parts) - these are critical for you to understand the inner working of the ADF "magic layer" that makes development so simple. 

By the way if you prefer to get knowledge through live or online instructor-lead courses or by reading books - we have those too - see the list here.

Step 4 - RTFM

Ok, now you have a good grasp of the framework and how it works, it might be a good time to read the manual for Oracle ADF - "Developing Fusion Web Applications with Oracle Application Development Framework". This is the complete guide and you should read it to get more insight into the framework, best practices, and general guidelines. Note that the ADF documentation libraries has additional books about ADF Faces, ADF Desktop Integration, Administration guides and more.

Step 5 - Become an ADF Architect

Now that you know how to build ADF apps, it's time to learn how to architect more complex projects and work in a team environment. The resource to learn from is the ADF Architecture Square - where we discuss best practices, development guidelines, and most importantly how to architect a complete complex application. Here you can find docs and also a link to a set of videos on the ADF Architecture Square YouTube Channel. If you only have time to watch one video from that channel - go for the "Angels in the ADF Architecture". By the way, if you are looking for a platform for your team to collaborate on while building Oracle ADF applications - check out the Oracle Developer Cloud Service and the integration it provides with JDeveloper.

Step 6 - Join the Community

As you continue on your development road, there will be times when you'll want to know "How do I do X?" or "Why do I get this error?". The nice thing is that since many other developers are working with ADF, you can leverage their collective knowledge. Got a question - type it into google and it is likely that you'll find blog entries and youtube videos that explain how to solve your issue.

A great place to search for answers is the indexed collection of ADF and JDeveloper blog articles. Search by keywords or topics and you'll likely get great samples to help you achieve your task.

Still can't find the answer? Ask your question on our ADF community forum, just don't forget to follow the basic rules of asking questions on the forum.

Things keep evolving in the world of Oracle ADF, so to keep up to speed you should follow JDeveloper on Twitter for the latest news.

Over the years Oracle ADF has proven itself to be a great framework for enterprise applications, and each new release introduced further capabilities and simplifications - If you are just now joining the world of Oracle ADF you are in for a great ride. Have fun.

Categories: Development

Extending Oracle Database DevOps with Automated PL/SQL Unit Testing

Mon, 2017-06-05 14:57
 
Automated testing helps you locate problems earlier in the development cycle saving you precious time down the road. This is why it should be a key part of any DevOps cycle - and your database code shouldn't be an exception to this rule.This blog entry will teach you how to execute tests automatically following code changes that you do in your Oracle database.
 
In previous blog entires I showed you how to use Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS for short) for database development including how to track and manage tasks, version code changes, conduct code reviews, and automate code deployment to the database. This blog adds one more step to this lifecycle - automated testing.
 
For PL/SQL testing I'm using the open-source utPLSQL unit testing solution. The team behind this project just released a completely re-written version of the framework with features that allow you to add PL/SQL testing to continuous integration processes.

A full explanation of utPLSQL is outside of the scope of this blog (They have decent documentation to get you started). But in short, the concept is that you write PL/SQL procedures that test other procedures. The framework includes functions you invoke from your test functions to evaluate results as well as annotations that deliver meaningful messages and information when reporting test results. The utPLSQL utility is comprised of a set of database objects that you install in a new schema, and then you use their ut.run() procedure to execute test cases.

One nice feature built into the framework is the ability to produce test result reports in a format that is compatible with regular JUnit tests. With this functionality, I was able to get Developer Cloud Service to show me the test results nicely. Further more the built in support of DevCS for the SQLcl commands, made it simple to integrate the PL/SQL based framework as part of a generic build process without the need to install anything else on my continuous integration server.

Here is a quick video showing you the result and the configuration needed.
In the video I show how a check in of a PL/SQL script into the Git repository triggers a chain of events that ends with publishing test results. If the test fails the build is marked as failed - which can trigger an email being sent to you notifying you each time someone broke your code.
 
 
Some tips for configuration of such a chain:

My build pipeline has two jobs. The first one runs the SQL scripts in the database. This job is triggered by any change made to my Git repository. So when I update my git repository with a SQL script that has a new definition of a database object, the build immediately takes it and updates the definition in my development or QA database.
Once this build job finishes, it queues up the next job - the unit testing job.

The unit testing job is using SQLcl to run the following commands:

set serveroutput on;
set feedback off;
spool /workspace_directory/results.xml;
exec ut.run(ut_xunit_reporter());
spool off;

I spool the results of the test run into an xml file that I keep in the workspace directory for my job. (You can find out this directory by adding a shell command build step that does echo $WORKSPACE - an environment variable on the build server). Then I execute the ut.run procedure with the parameter that tells it to output the results as XUnit/JUnit format - doc on this option here. I turn serverouput on to get the results to show, and I turn feedback off to hide the message that the procedure successfully completed.

In the post build step I archive the results.xml file, and then I indicate that I want to publish the content of this file as test results.
 
Post Build Step

When your build finishes you'll see your build status visually and you can then drill down to see specific tests status.
Notice that you can also ask to be notified by email on the results of the build (the CC Me button).
 
 
Click on a specific run of a job to drill down into the test results
 
Test Summary
And click on a specific test suite to get the details of each test

Test Results Report

That's it. You now have a complete chain that will notify you the minute that a database change someone did breaks any tests, helping you deliver better code faster.
Categories: Development

Automating Processes With Application Builder and Process Cloud Services

Tue, 2017-05-30 18:33

Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service (ABCS) gives you a great way to build apps that track data, but what if your data is also involved in processes? What if you need to automate not just the data collection but also the human workflow interactions? The new integration between Oracle ABCS and Oracle Process Cloud Service (PCS) enables you to achieve this easily.

You can now create processes that are associated with ABCS business objects and interact with them directly from your Oracle ABCS user interfaces. This is a two way interaction patterns, where PCS processes can access information from Oracle ABCS business objects, and ABCS user interfaces can be created on top of these PCS processes to initiate and progress processes.

PCS integration in ABCS

In the video example below I'm developing a basic approval flow for travel requests. The video will show you how the integration works covering:

  • Associating a process with a business object
  • Accessing the business object values from your process
  • Setting security and connection between PCS and ABCS
  • Initiating PCS processes from an ABCS page
  • Creating custom to-do list pages in ABCS to show you your tasks
  • Creating custom task details pages in ABCS to progress tasks

As you'll see, all of these are quite simple and completely declarative to achieve with the visual development approach.

The combination of the products provide great value to the users of each one of those. PCS customers will love the ability to persist the data they use in their processes, and the ability to design even richer interfaces and reports. ABCS users will love the ability to automate and manage long running complex processes. 

 

 

 

Categories: Development

Leveraging Oracle JET Composite Components in Oracle application Builder Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-05-15 16:17

One of the new features of Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service (ABCS) in the May 2017 release is integration with Oracle JET's Composite Components Architecture (JET CCA).

Based on the Web Components standard, JET CCA provides a way to define reusable UI components (with logic) that can easily be incorporated into multiple applications.

The new feature in ABCS allows you to pick such components as extensions to the ABCS design time, providing an easy standard way to extend your UI capabilities. For example in the screenshot below you see a new slider component in the common components section, and how it looks like when added to the visual designer.

ABCS Design Time
 

In this blog entry we'll start by creating a very simple JET CCA component and then see how to add it to Oracle ABCS. (Thanks goes to John Brock who helped get this sample working).

To learn more about JET CCA have a look at their developer guide, and the sample in the Oracle JET Cookbook. We are going to start from that sample and build a very basic component. (For a deep guided tour of Oracle JET CCA check out Duncan's series of JET CCA blogs)

There are 5 files needed to define a component.

5 files in a directory

We'll start with the loader.js file - this file provides info on the other files involved in the component. Note that in the sample we are registering "slider" as the name of the component, in this file we are also indicating which jet components we are going to use and including them in the define section. Specifically we are adding the ojs/ojslider component here.

define(['ojs/ojcore', 'text!./demo-cca.html', './demo-cca', 'text!./component.json', 'css!./demo-cca','ojs/ojcomposite', 'ojs/ojslider'], function(oj, view, viewModel, metadata) { oj.Composite.register('slider', { view: {inline: view}, viewModel: {inline: viewModel}, metadata: {inline: JSON.parse(metadata)} }); } );

The next file we'll create is the component.json file. This file describes the meta data about our component. One of the key things you can define here is a set of properties that users of the components can set when they add it to their application. The nice thing in the ABCS integration is that these will show up at design time as properties in the visual editor.

In our component we are defining four properties that control the title, minimum, maximum, and actual value of a slider. Note that right now ABCS is using Oracle JET 2.3 and we need to specify this in the file.

{ "name": "Slider", "description": "A sample Oracle JET Slider CCA", "version": "1.0.0", "jetVersion": ">=2.3.0", "properties": { "title": { "description": "Name of slider", "type": "string" }, "min": { "description": "Numeric minimum", "type": "number" }, "max": { "description": "Numeric maximum", "type": "number" }, "value": { "description": "Slider value", "type": "number" } } }

Next we'll define the html file (demo-cca.html) that includes our UI. We are using regular HTML code here along with knockout.js binding of properties to values. You can use the $props prefix to refer to values of attributes we defined in the components.json file.

<div data-bind="text: 'Title: '+$props.title"></div>
  <input id="slider-id"
     data-bind="ojComponent: {
            component: 'ojSlider',
            max:$props.max,
            min:$props.min,
            step:10,
            value:$props.value
            }"/>
             

Next there is a css file - controlling the look and feel of the component. Since we are not doing any customization on the look and feel we'll create an empty file called demo-cca.css.

Next is the model file (demo-cca.js) - this file contains data and logic that can be accessed from the component. We'll create a basic file without any logic code in it.

define(['knockout'], function (ko) { function model(context) { var self = this; return model; } } )

Now that you have created the 5 files - simply zip them into a single zip file. This zip file is the file you'll give to your component users. In this case to the ABCS developer.


Go into your Application Settings -> Extensions in Oracle ABCS and choose to create a new UI component from zip file. Upload the zip file you just created. Then make sure to enable the component using the boolean control on the page.

Component extension

Switch over to the UI Designer and you'll see that there is a new component in the component palette.
Drag and drop it into your page - and you'll see the HTML code. Set the properties in the property inspector and you'll see them influencing the content of your page.
You can also bind the properties to the values of fields in your custom business objects.

Here is a quick video showing the integration.

 

Categories: Development

Getting Data from REST Services into Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service

Fri, 2017-05-12 11:09

In the latest version of Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service (ABCS) that we rolled out at the beginning of May we introduced a set of new code templates for creating Business Object Providers.

BOP templates screen

Business Object Providers - or BOPs for short - are a mechanism that allow you to extend ABCS and have it access external REST sources of data. In the video below I'm going to show you how to use the most basic template provided for BOPs - which allows you to create a read only BOP.

The template has 2 files that you need to change - one (RESTOperationProvider.js) that has the code for accessing the REST service and reading the results, and the other (RESTEntityProvider.js) has the code that defines the structure of the object you are creating.

In the video I'm using this URL - https://api.github.com/users/Oracle/repos - that gets you a list of projects/repositories that Oracle owns on Github:

Once you created a BOP you can add a new "external service" to your application in the data designer, and then you can use that object like you would any other.

Check it out:

 

Categories: Development

Passing Business Object Values to Custom UI Components in ABCS

Mon, 2017-05-08 18:54

This quick one is based on a customer question about Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service. The scenario is that we have a business object that has a field that contains the URL to an image. We want to be able to show that image on a page in Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service.

Image showing up

To do that I add a custom UI component object to the details (or edit) page of a record - then I switched the HTML of that object to be: <img id="logoimg"/>

custom code

 

I then added a button to the page and added a bit of custom JavaScript code in its action as follow:

var img = document.getElementById('logoimg'); img.src=$Company.getValue('Logo'); resolve();

This code simply locates the custom object on the page using the object id and then sets the src property of the img html tag to match the value of the field in the business object.

Code in Button

 

 

Categories: Development

I'm On a New Blog Platform!

Fri, 2017-05-05 12:15

This happens every several years, our blogging platform at Oracle is switching to a new environment, and my blog is one of those moving. In the next few days I'll be testing to see if content migration did its magic and everything works.

If you run into any broken entries/links/samples please drop me a line or just comment on the specific blog entry, and I'll try to fix things.

Categories: Development

Passing Business Object Values to Custom UI Components in ABCS

Mon, 2017-04-24 17:29

This quick one is based on a customer question about Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service. The scenario is that we have a business object that has a field that contains the URL to an image. We want to be able to show that image on a page in Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service.

animated GIF

To do that I add a custom UI component object to the details (or edit) page of a record - then I switched the HTML of that object to be: <img id="logoimg"/>

custom code

I then added a button to the page and added a bit of custom JavaScript code in its action as follow:

var img = document.getElementById('logoimg');

img.src=$Company.getValue('Logo');

resolve();

This code simply locates the custom object on the page using the object id and then sets the src property of the img html tag to match the value of the field in the business object.

Code in Button

Categories: Development

Custom UI Components in Oracle ABCS for Dynamic Image Display

Mon, 2017-04-24 17:29

This quick one is based on a customer question about Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service. The scenario is that we have a business object that has a field that contains the URL to an image. We want to be able to show that image on a page in Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service.

animated GIF

To do that I add a custom UI component object to the details (or edit) page of a record - then I switched the HTML of that object to be: <img id="logoimg"/>

custom code

I then added a button to the page and added a bit of custom JavaScript code in its action as follow:

var img = document.getElementById('logoimg');

img.src=$Company.getValue('Logo');

resolve();

This code simply locates the custom object on the page using the object id and then sets the src property of the img html tag to match the value of the field in the business object.

Code in Button

Categories: Development

Passing Values Between Pages in Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service

Thu, 2017-03-09 12:50

A common use case for applications that have multiple pages is passing values between pages. For example you might want to pick up a specific record or value in one page and then use that as a parameter for a query in another page.

In the February release or Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service as part of the extension hook points that we provide, we added support for shared resources. These are JavaScript libraries you can add to your application - and that can be used across your app.

In the demo below I show you how you can use the built-in sample template for a shared resource to define a variable, and then how that variable is exposed in various places in the product through the expression builder allowing you to set its value in one page and use that value in another one.

Check it out:

Categories: Development

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