Shay Shmeltzer

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Oracle Blogs
Updated: 1 hour 52 min ago

Oracle's No-Cost Platinum-Level Support Is the New Baseline in the Cloud Market

Fri, 2018-05-18 18:36

Companies may give up their servers, storage, and entire data centers when they move to the cloud, but their need for support services doesn’t go away, it changes. Recognizing a growing need for enterprise-class support in the cloud, Oracle is making its Platinum-level support services available at no additional cost to all customers of Oracle Fusion software-as-a-service applications.

“Our objective is to put out a service capability that is simply the best—bar none,” said Oracle CEO Mark Hurd, in announcing that a range of support services would be available for Oracle Fusion enterprise resource planning, enterprise performance management, human capital management, supply chain, manufacturing, and sales and service cloud applications.

The SaaS support services include 24/7 rapid-response technical support, proactive technical monitoring, success planning, end-user adoption guidance, and education resources.

“Most of our customers are going to cloud,” Hurd said in a briefing with journalists at Oracle’s headquarters in Redwood Shores, California. As that happens, he said, “it’s important for someone in the industry, particularly an industry leader in these mission-critical applications, to take a position” on what level of service that transition demands.

“SaaS application support offerings need to become more agile and responsive,” Hurd added. “We need to provide our SaaS customers with everything they need for rapid, low-cost implementations and a successful rollout to their users.”

Catherine Blackmore, Oracle group vice president of North America Customer Success, said Oracle will also offer new advanced services, including dedicated support and certified expertise, for customers that need a higher level of support. “We have a shared interest in our customers’ success, so we’re going above and beyond to ensure our customers have everything they need to succeed,” she said.

Cloud Levels the Playing Field

Oracle also announced the names of first-time cloud customers and others that are expanding their use of Oracle Cloud services. They include Alsea, Broadcom, Exelon, Gonzaga University, Heineken Urban Polo, Providence St. Joseph Health, Sinclair Broadcast Group, and T-Mobile US.

In a Q&A with the journalists, Hurd was asked about his outlook for SaaS adoption outside of the United States and, in particular, in the Latin America region. He said modern cloud applications can be “game changing” for businesses in places where outdated software applications are still the norm.

“You don’t need armies of experts and system integrators,” Hurd said.

Oracle develops thousands of features that are made available regularly to its SaaS application customers. “That’s a feature stream you don’t have to manage from a data center that you don’t have to operate,” Hurd said.

Self-Driving Technology

Hurd pointed to Oracle’s development of autonomous technologies, including the recently introduced Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud Service, as another big area of focus at the company. “It gets upgraded, optimized, secured, patched, and tuned, all automatically without any human intervention,” he said.

As the next step in the delivery of autonomous cloud services, Oracle announced the availability of three new Oracle Cloud Platform services with built-in artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms: Oracle Autonomous Analytics CloudOracle Autonomous Integration Cloud, and Oracle Autonomous Visual Builder Cloud.

Categories: Development

Modern Customer Experience 2018 was Legendary

Fri, 2018-05-18 17:53

During his keynote at Modern Customer Experience 2018, Des Cahill, Head CX Evangelist, stated that CX should stand for Continuous Experimentation. He encouraged 4,500 enthusiastic marketers, customer service, sales, and commerce professional us to try new strategies, to take risks, strive to be remarkable, and triumph through sheer determination.

Casey Neistat echoed Des, challenging us to “do what you can’t,” while best-selling author Cheryl Strayed inspired us to look past our fears and be brave. “Courage isn’t success,” she reminded us, “it’s doing what’s hard regardless of the outcome.”

CX professionals today face numerous challenges: the relentless rise of customer expectations, the accelerating pace of innovation, evolving regulations like GDPR, increase ROI, plus the constant pressure to raise the bar. Modern Customer Experience not only inspired attendees to become the heroes of their organization, but it armed each with the tools to do so.

If you missed Carolyne-Matseshe Crawford, VP of Fan Experience at Fanatics talk about how her company’s culture pervades the entire customer experience, or how Magen Hanrahan VP of Product Marketing at Kraft Heinz is obsessed with data driven marketing tactics, give them a watch. And don’t miss Comcast’s Executive VP, Chief Customer Experience Officer, Charlie Herrin, who wants to build proactive customer experience and dialogue into Comcast’s products themselves with artificial intelligence.

The Modern Customer Experience X Room showcased CX innovation, like augmented and virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things. But it wasn’t all just mock-ups and demos, a Mack Truck, a Yamaha motorcycle, and an Elgin Street Sweeper were on display, showcasing how Oracle customers put innovation to use to create legendary customer experiences.

Attendees were able to let off some steam during morning yoga and group runs. They relived the 90s with Weezer during CX Fest, and our Canine Heroes from xxxxx were a highlight of everyone’s day.

But don’t just take it from us. Here’s what a few of our attendees had to say about the event.

“Modern Customer Experience gives me the ability to learn about new products on the horizon, discuss challenges, connect with other MCX participants, learn best practices and understand we’re not alone in our journey.” – Matt Adams, Sales Cloud Manager, ArcBest

 “Modern Customer Experience really allows me to do my job more effectively. Without it, I don’t know where I would be! It’s the best conference of the year.” – Joshua Parker, Digital Marketing and Automation Manager, Rosetta Stone

We’re still soaking it all in. You can watch all the highlights from Modern Customer Experience keynotes on YouTube, and peruse the event’s photo slideshow. Don’t forget to share your images on social media, with #ModernCX and sign up for alerts when registration for Modern Customer Experience 2019 opens!

Categories: Development

The Most Important Stop on Your Java Journey

Fri, 2018-05-18 14:52

Howdy, Pardner. Have you moseyed over to JavaRanch lately? Pull up a stool at the OCJA or OCJP Wall of Fame and tell your tale or peruse the tales of others. 

Ok - I'm not so great at the cowboy talk, but if you're serious about a Java career and haven't visited JavaRanch, you are missing out! 

JavaRanch, a self-proclaimed "friendly place for Java greenhorns [beginners]" was created in 1997 by Kathy Sierra, co-author of at least 5 Java guides for Oracle Press. The ranch was taken over in subsequent years by Paul Wheaten who continues to run this space today.

In addition to a robust collection of discussion forums about all things Java, JavaRanch provides resources to learn and practice Java, book recommendations, and resources to create your first Java program and test your Java skills.

One of our favorite features of JavaRanch remains the Walls of Fame! This is where you can read the personal experiences of other candidates certified on Java. Learn from their processes and their mistakes. Be inspired by their accomplishments. Share your own experience. 

Visit the Oracle Certified Java Associate Wall of Fame

Visit the Oracle Certified Java Professional Well of Fame

Get the latest Java Certification from Oracle

Oracle Certified Associate, Java SE 8 Programmer

Oracle Certified Professional, Java SE 8 Programmer

Oracle Certified Professional, Java SE 8 Programmer (upgrade from Java SE 7)

Oracle Certified Professional, Java SE 8 Programmer (upgrade from Java SE 6 and all prior versions)

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Test Your Java Knowledge With FREE Sample Questions

Program Your Future With Java

Categories: Development

What's New with Oracle Certification - May

Fri, 2018-05-18 14:49
Stay up to date with the Oracle Certification Program.
Keep informed with new exams released into production,
get information on current promotions, and learn about new program announcements. New Exams and Certifications

Oracle Mobile Cloud Enterprise 2018 Associate Developer | 1Z0-927: This certification covers implementation topics of related Oracle Paas Services such as: Visual Builder Cloud Service, Java Cloud Service, Developer Cloud Service, Application Container Cloud Service, and Container Native Apps. This certification validates understanding of the Application Development portfolio and capacity to configure the services.

Oracle Management Cloud 2018 Associate | 1Z0-930: Passing this exams demonstrates the skills and knowledge to architect and implement Oracle Management Cloud. This individual can configure Application Performance Monitoring, Oracle Infrastructure Monitoring, Oracle Log Analytics, Oracle IT Analytics, Oracle Orchestration, Oracle Security Monitoring and Analytics and Oracle Configuration and Compliance.

Oracle Cloud Security 2018 Associate | 1Z0-933: Passing this exam validates understanding of Oracle Cloud Security portfolio and capacity to configure the services. This certification covers topics such as: Identity Security Operations Center Framework, Identity Cloud Service, CASB Cloud Service, Security Monitoring and Analytics Cloud Service, Configuration and Compliance Service, and services Architecture and Deployment.

Oracle Data Integration Platform Cloud 2018 Associate | 1Z0-935: Passing this exam validates understanding of Oracle Application Integration to implement the service. This certification covers topics such as: Oracle Cloud Application Integration basics, Application Integration: Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC), Service-Oriented Architecture Cloud Service (SOACS), Integration API Platform Cloud Service, Internet of Things - Cloud Service (IOTCS), and Oracle's Process Cloud Service.

Oracle Analytics Cloud 2018 Associate | 1Z0-936: Passing this exam provides knowledge required to perform provisioning, build dimensional modelling and create data visualizations. The certified professional can use Advanced Analytics capabilities, create a machine learning model and configure Oracle Analytics Cloud Essbase.

Explore All Certifications

 

How Does the DBA Keep Their Role Relevant? 

By having the skills to meet the new demands for business optimization along with a reputation of continuous learning and improvement. Check out how training + certification keeps a DBA relevant. Read full article.

 

Benefits of Upgrading Your OCA certification to Database 12c Release 2

Building upon the competencies in the Oracle Database 12c OCA certification, the Oracle Certified Professional (OCP) for Oracle Database 12c includes the advanced knowledge and skills required of top-performing database administrators which includes development and deployment of backup, recovery and Cloud computing strategies. Find out how to upgrade with this exam!

Categories: Development

Filtering a Table, List or Other Collections in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Wed, 2018-05-16 18:36

A common use case when working with data is to try and filter it.

For example if you have a set of records shown in a table in the UI the user might want to filter those to show specific rows.

In the video below I show you the basic way to achieve this using the filterCriterion of ServiceDataProvider variables - the type of variable that populates tables and lists.

Basically each SDP has an attribute called filterCriterion that accepts a structure that can contain arrays of conditions. You can then map a criteria that leverage for example a page level variable connected to a field.

FilterCriterion setting

In the criteria you'll specify

  • an attribute - this will be the column id (not title) of your business object
  • a value - this is the value you are filtering based on - usually a pointer to a variable in your page
  • An operator (op) - the filterCriterion is using operators like $eq or $ne - these are based on the Oracle JET AttributeFilterOperator - a full list of the operators is here.

In the video I end up with a filterCriterion that is:

{ "criteria": [ { "value": "{{ $page.variables.filterVar }}", "op": "{{ \"$eq\"\n }}", "attribute": "{{ \"traveler\"\n }}" } ], "op": "{{ \"$or\"\n }}" }

Since you can have multiple criteria you can also specify an operator on them - either an or ($or) or an and ($and) - these are CompoudOperators from Oracle JET.

By the way, this will work automatically for your Business Objects, however if you want to apply this to data from a random REST service - then that service will need to have filtering transformation defined for it.

 

Categories: Development

Reflecting Changes in Business Objects in UI Tables with Visual Builder

Wed, 2018-05-16 11:52

While the quick start wizards in Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) make it very easy to create tables and other UI components and bind them to business objects, it is good to understand what is going on behind the scenes, and what the wizards actually do. Knowing this will help you achieve things that we still don't have wizards for.

For example - let's suppose you created a business object and then created a UI table that shows the fields from that business object in your page. You probably used the "Add Data" quick start wizard to do that. But then you remembered that you need one more column added to your business object, however after you added that one to the BO, you'll notice it is not automatically shown in the UI. That makes sense since we don't want to automatically show all the fields in a BO in the UI.

But how do you add this new column to the UI?

The table's Add Data wizard will be disabled at this point - so is your only option to drop and recreate the UI table? Of course not!

 

If you'll look into the table properties you'll see it is based on a page level ServiceDataProvider ( SDP for short) variable. This is a special type of object that the wizards create to represent collections. If you'll look at the variable, you'll see that it is returning data using a specific type. Note that the type is defined at the flow level - if you'll look at the type definition you'll see where the fields that make up the object are defined.

Type Definition

It is very easy to add a new field here - and modify the type to include the new column you added to the BO. Just make sure you are using the column's id - and not it's title - when you define the new field in the items array.

Now back in the UI you can easily modify the code of the table to add one more column that will be hooked up to this new field in the SDP that is based on the type.

Sounds complex? It really isn't - here is a 3 minute video showing the whole thing end to end:

As you see - a little understanding of the way VBCS works, makes it easy to go beyond the wizards and achieve anything.

Categories: Development

Leveraging "On Field Value Changes" Event in Visual Builder Cloud Service - Redone

Tue, 2018-05-15 16:08

With the new Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) released this month, some of my past how-to's that shows tricks in VBCS are no longer valid/needed.

The direct access we provide to both REST services and the UI components in your application make things that in the past required code or hacking much simpler.

Here is one example - reacting to value change events on fields and modifying other UI components based on them.

Input component have a "value" event that you can hook into and provide an action chain that will be executed when the value change.

In the video below you see for example how I can use a value selected in a drop down list to control whether other components on the page are shown or hidden.

To do this, you define a page variable that you can change in the "value" event. You can then rely on that page variable to control another component behavior.

As you can see - no coding needed - just drag and drop your way to create the functionality.

action chain

 

 

Categories: Development

Why Are You So Quiet?

Wed, 2018-05-09 12:19

You might have noticed that this blog didn't post new entries in the past couple of months, and you might have wondered why.

Well the answer is that I've been publishing content on some other related blogs around the Oracle blogsphere.

If you want to read those have a look at my author page here:

https://blogs.oracle.com/author/shay-shmeltzer

As you'll see we have new versions of both Visual Builder Cloud Service and Developer Cloud Service - both with extensive updates to functionality.

Working and learning those new versions and producing some demos is another reason I wasn't that active here lately.

That being said, now that both are out there - you are going to see more blogs coming from me.

But as mentioned at the top - these might be published in other blogs too.

So to keep up to date you might want to subscribe to this feed:

https://blogs.oracle.com/author/shay-shmeltzer/rss

See you around,

Shay

Categories: Development

Using an "On Field Value Changes" Event in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-12-11 16:51

This entry is based on previous entries from John and Shray that deal with the same topic and provide the same type of solution. John's entry was created before VBCS provided the UI id for components, and Shray's entry is dealing with a more complex scenario that also involve fetching new data. So I figured I'll write my version here - mostly for my own future reference if I'll need to do this again.

The Goal is to show how you can modify the UI shown in a VBCS page in response to data changes in fields. For example how to hide or show a field based on the value of another field.

To do this, you need to hook into the HTML lifecycle of your VBCS page and subscribe to events in the UI. Then you code the changes you want to happen. Your gateway into manipulating/extending the HTML lifecycle in VBCS is the custom component available in the VBCS component palette. It provides a way to add your own HTML+JavaScript into an existing page.

The video below shows you the process (along with a couple of small mistakes along the route):

The basic steps to follow:

Find out the IDs of the business object field whose value changes you want to listen to. You'll also need to know the IDs of the UI component you want to manipulate - this is shown as the last piece of info in the property inspector when you click on a component. 

Once you have those you'll add a custom component into your page, and look up the observable that relates to the business object used in the page. This can be picked up from the "Generated Page Model (read-only)" section of the custom component and it will look something like : EmpEntityDetailArchetype

Next you are going to add a listener to your custom component model. Add it after the lines 

//the page view model this.pageViewModel = params.root;

your code would look similar to this:

this._listener = this.pageViewModel.Observables.EmpEntityDetailArchetype.item.ref2Job.currentIDSingle.subscribe(function (value) { if (value === "2") { $("#pair-currency-32717").show(); } else { $("#pair-currency-32717").hide(); } }); CustomComponentViewModel.prototype.dispose = function () { this._listener.dispose(); };

Where you will replace the following:

  • EmpEntityDetailArchetype  should be replaced with the observable for your page model.
  • ref2Job  should be replaced with the id of the column in the business object whose value you are monitoring.
  • pair-currency-32717 should be replaced with the id of the UI component you want to modify. (in our case show/hide the component).

You can of course do more than just show/hide a field with this approach.

Categories: Development

Date Calculations and Queries with Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Fri, 2017-11-17 12:10

It's very easy to define a field in a custom object in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service to store a date, but when it comes to doing calculations and queries based on this date you'll find that you need to resort to a little bit of JavaScript calculations.

Here are a couple of useful things to know if you are trying to do that.

Calculating Age (or time passed from a date in years)

Let's assume you are storing information about employees and one of the pieces of information you have is their date of birth - the Birthday field in the image below.

How do you show their actual age in years on a page?

You can define a calculated field in your business object - and have VBCS use the "calculate value with formula" as the source for this field.

Your formula would be something like:

(new Date() -new Date($birthdate) )/ (60*60*24*1000*365)

You are calculating the difference between today's date and the birthday field and since the answer is in milliseconds you convert it to years by dividing by the number of milliseconds in a year.

Note that as you type in your formula the dialog shows you the results of the formula below the formula field - quite useful to verify that you are doing it right.

Now your page can show the age of your employees:

Filtering Based on Date

What if you wanted to limit the records shown in the table above to only show employees of a specific age?

The tricky part is that you'll need to do the calculation against the birthday field and not against the age field. The age field is not actually stored anywhere - rather it is calculated on the fly.

Let's take the table shown above and assume we want to limit it to show employees who are younger than 9 years. To do that we'll add a query condition to our table to check that the birthday is larger than the date of (today - 9 years).

The calculation of the date 9 years ago will be with a formula like this:

new Date($current_date-9*365*24*60*60*1000)

Now your table only shows older employees.

Want to have a more dynamic way to define the query criteria - you can adopt the approach I showed in the blog about Creating Custom Search/Query Pages with Visual Builder along with the techniques shown here.

One last note - since not every year has 365 days - the calculation for milliseconds conversion is not completely accurate - but it is quite close.

Categories: Development

Conditional Navigation based on Queries in Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service

Wed, 2017-11-15 13:21

A couple of threads on the Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service forum asked about writing code in buttons in VBCS that compares values entered in a page to data in business objects and perform conditional navigation based on the values. In a past blog I showed the code needed for querying VBCS objects from the UI, but another sample never hurts, so here is another demo...

For this demo I'm going to show how to do it in a login flow - assuming you have a business object that keeps usernames and passwords, and you want to develop a page where a user types a user/pass combination and you need to verify that this is indeed a valid combination that exist in the business object.

(In reality, if you want to do user authentication in VBCS - you should use the built in security frameworks and not code it this way. I'm just using this as an example.)

Here is a quick video of the working app - with pointers to the components detailed below.

The first thing you'll do is create the business object that hosts the user/pass combination - note that in the video since "user" is a reserved word - the ID for the field is actually "user_" - which is what we'll use in our code later on.

 

Next you'll want to create a new page where people can insert a user/pass combination - to do that create a new page of type "Create" - this page will require you to associate it with a business object, so create a new business object. We won't actually keep data in this new business object. In the video and the code - this business object is called "query".

Now design your page and add the user and pass fields - creating parallel fields in the query business object (quser and qpass in the video). You can then remove the "Save" button that won't be use, and instead add a "validate" button.

For this new button we'll define a new custom action that will contain custom JavaScript code. Custom code should return either a success state - using resolve(); - or failure - using reject();

Based on the success or failure you can define the next action in the flow - in our case we are showing either a success or error message:

success flow

Now lets look at the custom JavaScript code:

require(['operation/js/api/Conditions', 'operation/js/api/Operator'], function (Conditions, Operator) { var eo = Abcs.Entities().findById('Users'); var passid = eo.getProperty('pass'); var userid = eo.getProperty('user_'); var condition = Conditions.AND( Conditions.SIMPLE(passid, Operator.EQUALS,$QueryEntityDetailArchetypeRecord.getValue('qpass') ), Conditions.SIMPLE(userid, Operator.EQUALS, $QueryEntityDetailArchetypeRecord.getValue('quser')) ); var operation = Abcs.Operations().read( { entity : eo, condition : condition }); operation.perform().then(function (operationResult) { if (operationResult.isSuccess()) { operationResult.getData().forEach(function (oneRecord) { resolve("ok"); }); } reject("none"); } ). catch (function (operationResult) { if (operationResult.isFailure()) { // Insert code you want to perform if fetching of records failed alert('didnt worked'); reject("error"); } }); });

Explaining the code:

  • Lines 2-4 - getting the pointers to the business object and the fields in it using their field id.
  • Lines 5-8 - defining a condition with AND - referencing the values of the fields on the page
  • Lins 9-11 - defining the operation to read data with the condition from the business object
  • Line 12 - executing the read operation
  • Line 14-18 - checking if a record has been returned and if it has then we are ok to return success - there was a user/pass combination matching the condition.
  • Line 19 - otherwise we return with a failure.

One recommendation, while coding JavaScript - use a good code editor that will help highlight open/close brackets matches - it would save you a lot of time.

For more on the VBCS JavaScript API that you can use for accessing business components see the doc.

Categories: Development

Introduction to Oracle Developer Cloud Service Issue Tracking REST Interfaces

Mon, 2017-11-06 13:38

The task tracking system in Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) helps your team manage your development priorities and process. DevCS offers a simple web interface for working with the system. However, in some cases you might want to build your own interfaces to interact with the issues. For example, you might want to build a system for end-users to report bugs in your app and you don't want to give them direct access to the DevCS web insterface. In the August 17 update of DevCS  we introduced a set of REST services that will let you build a custom interface that will interact with our issues repository.

The official documentation for the DevCS REST services is here.

I wanted to share some tips to help you get this going in your project. The results are in this short video demo, and the details are below.

Figuring Out The End Points

The documentation gives you the basic end-points you should be calling, but it took me a little bit of time to figure out the full URL to the end point. Turns out the URL is composed in the following way:

https://server/org-id/rest/org-id+project-id/issues/v2/issues

The first parts (server/org-id) are quite easy to get - just copy it from the URL of your project when you look at it in your browser.

The org-id+project-id part is something you can get by looking at the details of your maven repository URL - see the image below - what you are looking for is the part before the /maven/ at the end:

Note that in some projects this will also include a numeric value appended to the project name. Something like developer-oracletemplates_db-oss-devops_20266.

In the video sample below the result URL for the REST that returns the list of issues currently in the system ended up being:

https://myserver/developer-oracletemplates/rest/developer-oracletemplates_adf1221/issues/v2/issues

Creating New Issues

One of the useful services is the /issues/v2/issues/create-form service. It returns a json file that you can edit to specify information about a new task that you want to create.

Note that the file start with : {"createIssue":{"links":.... Before you use the file to insert a new issue, you'll need to remove the  {"createIssue": at the start and the corresponding } at the end of the file. Only then can you use it to submit the POST operation to create an issue.

In the video I used the following command to create the issue in the DevCS:

curl -X POST -u shay@oracle.com https://myserver/developer-oracletemplates/rest/developer-oracletemplates_adf1221/issues/v2/issues/ -d@issue.json -H 'Content-type:application/json'

(the -d allows you to specify the name of the file with the new issue, and the -H specifies the content format).

Now that you have access to the information you can create new systems on top of it using your favorite development tool. At the end of the video you can see a simple issue system I built with Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service - more on that in a future blog entry.

 

Categories: Development

Exporting and Importing Data from Visual Builder Cloud Service - with REST Calls

Thu, 2017-11-02 16:37

Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) makes it very easy to create custom objects to store your data. A frequent request we get is for a way to load and export data from these business objects. As John blogged, we added a feature to support doing this through the command line - John's blog shows you the basic options for the command line.

I recently needed to do this for a customer, and thought I'll share some tips that helped me get the functionality working properly - in case others need some help skipping bumps in the road.

Here is a demo showing both import and export and how to get them to work.

Exporting Data

Export is quite simple - you use a GET operation on a REST service, the command line for calling this using curl will look like this:

curl -u user:password https://yourserver/design/ExpImp/1.0/resources/datamgr/export > exp.zip

The result is a streaming of a zip file, so I just added a > exp.zip file to the command's end. The zip file will contain CSV files for each object in your application.

Don't forget to replace the bold things with your values for username and password, your VBCS server name and the name of the app you are using (ExpImp in my case).

Importing Data

Having the exported CSV file makes it easy to build a CSV file for upload - in the demo I just replaced and added values in that file. Next you'll use a similar curl command to call a POST method. It will look like this:

curl -X POST -u user:password https://yourserver/design/ExpImp/1.0/resources/datamgr/import/Employee?filename=Employee.csv -H "Origin:https://yourserver" -H "Content-Type:text/csv" -T Employee.csv -v

A few things to note.

You need to specify which object you want to import into (Employee after the /import/ in the command above), and you also need to provide a filename parameter that tell VBCS which file to import.

In the current release you need to work around a CORS security limitation - this is why we are adding a header (with the -H option) that indicate that we are sending this from the same server as the one we are running on. In an upcoming version this won't be needed.

We use the -T option to attach the csv file to our call.

Note that you should enable the "Enable basic authentication for business object REST APIs" security option for the application (Under Application Settings->Security). 

Using Import in Production Apps

In the samples above we imported and exported into an application that is still being developed - this is why we used the /design/ in our REST path.

If you want to execute things on an application that you published then replace the /design/ with /deployment/ 

One special note about live applications, before you import data into them you'll need to lock them. You can do this from the home page of VBCS and the drop down menu on the application.

 

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Categories: Development

Using Flyway to Manage Oracle DB Versions in the Cloud

Thu, 2017-10-19 13:11

This is another entry in my series about managing database scripts/schema as part of agile development. In the past I showed how to use simple SQL and Liquibase to manage schema creation/population scripts, and today I'll show you how to use Flyway.

Flyway log

Flyway is a free open source solution for managing "database migrations" - or basically helping you keep multiple database in synch by tracking and applying changes to the schema structure and data.

Flyway uses simple SQL scripts - which means you can use DB specific syntax - and tracks their execution in the database through a table it maintains. It is very easy to get started with and only has 6 commands that you need to be familiar with.

The main command is "migrate" which will check your database status, and then run all the newer scripts that have yet to be run on that instance.

Flyway uses a directory structure that contains a sql folder where you'll host all your SQL scripts. It uses a naming convention (that can be adjusted) where you start the file name with a Version number (V1, V1.1, V2.1) and then two "_" followed by a description - so something like V1__Create_Emp_Table - will show up as "Create Emp Table" when you issue the "info" command to find out what is the status of a database and which scripts have already run. By the way, the info command will also show you which new scripts are pending to be run on a specific database instance.

In the video below I show how to configure and use Flyway, and how to integrate it into an automatic DevOps process leveraging Oracle Developer Cloud Service. (including task tracking, Git version management of the source, and build execution of the scripts).

Flyway can integrate with various build framework (ant, maven, gradle etc), but since many DB folks are not familiar with those, I chose to use simple command lines in my demo to invoke Flyway. On my laptop and local MySQL DB I just used the Flyway command line utility. However Flyway is not installed by default in the DevCS servers, so I did a little trick:

Flyway is a Java program, so into my DevCS Git repository I uploaded the Flyway directory along with needed jars for flyway and the JDBC driver. Then I looked at the script for invoking the command line and found out the Java command they used and copied it into a regular shell command in my build:

java -cp lib/flyway-commandline-4.2.0.jar:lib/flyway-core-4.2.0.jar org.flywaydb.commandline.Main info -user=fw -password=$Password -url=jdbc:oracle:thin:@ipaddress:1521/servicename

The $Password refers to a build parameter which is encrypted.

The directory structure and files in my Git are shown in this image:

directory structure

 

Categories: Development

Introduction to Liquibase and Managing Your Database Source Code

Mon, 2017-10-16 10:35

In previous posts I showed how you can manage SQL scripts lifecycle with the help of Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) as part of an overall Oracle DB DevOps solution. I wanted to add one more utility that might act as an alternative or addition to the SQL script managing - Liquibase.

Liquibase logo

Liquibase is an open source solution for managing revisions of your databse schema scripts. It works across various types of databases, and supports various file formats for defining the DB structure. The feature that is probably most attractive in Liquibase is its ability to roll changes back and forward from a specific point - saving you from the need to know what was the last change/script you ran on a specific DB instance.

Liquibase uses scripts - referred to as "changesets" - to manage the changes you do to your DB. The changesets files can be in various formats including XML, JSON, YAML, and SQL. In the examples below I'm using the XML format.

As you continue to change an enhance your DB structure through the development lifecycle you'll add more changesets. A master file lists all the changeset files (or the directories where they are). In parallel Liquibase tracks in your database which changesets have already run. 

When you issue a liquibase update command, liquibase looks at the current state of your DB, and identifies which changes have already happened. Then it run the rest of the changes - getting you to the latest revision of the structure you are defining.

By integrating Liquibase into your overall code version management system and continuous integration platform you can synch up your database versions with your app version. In my case this would of course mean integration with Oracle Developer Cloud Service (DevCS) - which you get for free with the Oracle Database Cloud Service. In the video below I show a flow that covers:

  • Tracking my DBA tasks in the issue system
  • Modifying a local MySQL DB with Liquibase (doing forward and backward rolls)
  • Adding a change set defining a new table
  • Committing to Git
  • Automatic build implementing the changes in Oracle Database Cloud Service
  • Automatic testing with UT/PLSQL

Here is a quick 10 minute demo:

For those who want to try and replicate this, here are some resources:

A changeset that creates a "department" table with three columns:

A changeset that creates PL/SQL function, package and procedure. Note that in line 3 the dbms="oracle" means this script will only run when we are connected to an Oracle DB:

create or replace function betwnstr( a_string varchar2, a_start_pos integer, a_end_pos integer ) return varchar2 is begin return substr( a_string, a_start_pos, a_end_pos - a_start_pos+1 ); end; create or replace package test_betwnstr as -- %suite(Between string function) -- %test(Returns substring from start position to end position) procedure basic_usage; end; create or replace package body test_betwnstr as procedure basic_usage is begin ut.expect( betwnstr( '1234567', 2, 5 ) ).to_equal('2345'); end; end; A changeset that adds a record to a table. Line 8 has the rollback tag that defines how to do a rollback for this insert: delete from department where id=20

 

A few tips about my DevCS project and build setup.

1. For the sake of simplicity, I loaded the liquibase and JDBC jar files into my git repository - this makes it easy for my build steps to find the files and execute them. I'm guessing you could also use Maven to host those.

2. I use a password parameter for my build so I don't need to hardcode the password adding a bit of security to my build. Reference teh parameter in your build with a $ sign - $password

3. Want to learn more about test automation with ut/PLSQL - check out this blog entry.

 

 

Categories: Development

Creating Custom Search/Query Pages with Visual Builder

Fri, 2017-09-15 10:39

There is built in functionality in Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS) that will let you attach an advanced filter to any table. This will give you the ability to define complex searches.

However, sometime people would want to create their own custom query pages. For example the default filter for a field searches for a letter in any place in the field - and maybe you just want to search for the first letter. Or maybe you want to display a nice selection list for filtering. There is a little trick that will let you achieve this, and I show it in the video:

The basic steps involve creating a new edit page with a new dummy business object. Then you add a table that is based on the real business object (the one with the data), and hook up the query of this table to the values of fields from the dummy business object. Then you add a button to do a "fetch all" on the table, and you are done.

At the end of the video you'll also see how to hook this page into your main menu.

Categories: Development

A Guide to Attending Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne for Free

Thu, 2017-09-14 11:32

This title seems like a click bait, but I'll try and show you that this is actually possible. (Especially if you act fast).

A pass to both conferences is not a cheap item, and with training budgets shrinking you might be running into problems getting approval to expense this to your company. But here are a couple of tricks you can use to get free access to OOW/JavaOne. Some would get you a full pass and some will get you into specific areas and sessions.

Full Pass

Be a Speaker

Well we are a bit late to the call for papers at this point, but you might still be able to become a co-speaker if you have a good customer story to tell that shows how you are using the product/technology that a talk is about. Oracle is always looking to feature customer stories in our sessions - it is always better when a customer shares their real live success. Look up the content catalog and locate sessions on products that you are successfully implementing - ping the speaker and they might want to add you as a co-speaker.

Apply for the Oracle Excellence Awards

We are late for getting in this year, but keep an eye for this for next year. Winners get a free pass to OOW. Details here.

JavaOne Special Discount

Right now you can get 50% off your JavaOne ticket price if you use this code DJFS2017. Register here https://www.oracle.com/javaone/register.html

Other Passes

So full pass might be hard to get for free, but you can get in on a big chunk of the action for free using 

The Discoverer pass

A Discoverer pass lets you into the exhibit halls and various keynotes. Getting into the exhibit hall is great if you want to meet product managers and learn about the latest versions (and upcoming versions too). Most of the PMs are going to do shifts at the Oracle Demoground in their product pods - so hang out there and you'll be able to chat with us.

Usually a Discoverer pass is $75 - but since you are reading this blog, you can get one for free - use the code CDFR2017. Register here.

Oracle Code

Want to get into some technical sessions - this year we are bringing Oracle Code back to San Francisco during OOW - and you can get into this part of the conference for free. Reg here:

https://developer.oracle.com/code/sanfrancisco-oct-2017

See you at the conference in a couple of weeks.

 

 

 

Categories: Development

Sending Emails from Visual Builder Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-09-11 12:23

Sending emails as a result of some changes to data is a common requirement we've been hearing from customers of Oracle Visual Builder Cloud Service (VBCS). In previous versions we already added a function that allows you to fire up the client email software from your app. In the new version we rolled out a couple of weeks ago we added a new function that can manage the whole email processing inside VBCS - on the backend/server/cloud side.

When you define a new trigger on a business object you now have the option to add "send email notification" step to your logic flow. 

When you are defining this, you'll be able to pick or define a template for your email. The email template can have parameters to increase reusability. These parameters can then have their value set from expressions that can include values of fields from your objects.

Here is a complete demo video that shows you how to add an email notification to an event on your business object:

Categories: Development

Advanced Code Search for Git in Oracle Developer Cloud Service

Mon, 2017-07-10 07:11

One of the new features introduced in a recent monthly update of Oracle Developer Cloud Service is the advanced code search box you can see at the top right when you look at your Git repositories. This is a separate search functionality from the regular project artifacts search the box does in the other section of DevCS.

search screen

This search functionality is language aware, supporting a variety of languages including Java, JavaScript, HTML and CSS. It scans and indexes your code to understand its structure. DevCS can then do context aware searches for objects in your code, providing you autosuggest and even supporting camelCasing in the search box.

In the short video below I show you how this works. I start by importing code from a random github project into DevCS - and then I perform a search and show you how to find out the files, lines of code & revision references to your search term. You'll also see how code navigation works in the browser.

For more information about this capability have a look at the documentation here.

 

Categories: Development

How Do I Start Learning Oracle ADF - The 12c Edition

Fri, 2017-06-30 17:42

The most popular blog entry on my blog has been the "How do I start Learning ADF" entry for years now. That entry however was last updated in 2012 (and written in 2010) - so I figured it is time to give it another update, point to more recent resources, fix broken links, and cover additional resources that appeared over the years.

So here is the ADF 12c version of that blog entry updated for 2017:

Get started with Oracle ADF in 6 steps

Step 1 - Learn Basic Java

Oracle ADF aims to reduce the amount of coding you need to do for a lot of the tasks you'll need for building an application, and if you follow some of the tutorials mentioned later you'll see how you can build advanced apps without coding. But, at the end of the day, you will write code when developing with ADF - and that code would be written in Java. You don't have to be a Java ninja to work in ADF, but you should be familiar with basic language concepts and constructs.

There are lots of resources out there that will teach you the language (by the way if you are on ADF 12.2.* you should learn the Java/JDK 8 syntax), one option is the Oracle Java Tutorials path. Searching online you'll be able to find many other resources for this task. Since Oracle ADF is based on Java EE architecture - you might want to also get a bit of understanding of that architecture - but don't worry about learning all of Java EE in details - ADF will make it much simpler for you.

While learning the language you should be practicing it with the development tool that you are going to use, if you are going to developer Oracle ADF applications then that tool will be Oracle JDeveloper. Get yourself familiar with the basic IDE features for coders by running through this IDE tutorial.

Step 2 - Get started with Oracle ADF

Now that you know the basics of the Java language (and maybe some Java EE concepts), it's time to start using the framework that will simplify your life. Start by reading the data sheet and technical paper to understand what ADF is all about.

Now get your hands dirty by completing the Overview tutorial for Oracle ADF - this will take you a couple of hours but by the end of it you'll have built a full blown application, and you will touch on most of the parts of the Oracle ADF architecture.

Two other tutorials you should do next will deepen your knowledge about the Oracle ADF Controller Layer and taskflows, and the Oracle ADF Faces UI layer. If you got more time, have a run through other tutorials from our site.

Step 3 - Getting Educated

Now that you have hands-on experience with Oracle ADF, it would be a good point to go and get some deeper knowledge about how the framework works. You can leverage the collection of free online lessons we recorded in the ADF Essentials channel. You don't have to watch all the videos, but I would definitely recommend that at a minimum you'll watch the overview, ADF business components, ADF Controller (both parts) and ADF Faces video. And then you must watch the video about the ADF bindings internal seminars (2 parts) - these are critical for you to understand the inner working of the ADF "magic layer" that makes development so simple. 

By the way if you prefer to get knowledge through live or online instructor-lead courses or by reading books - we have those too - see the list here.

Step 4 - RTFM

Ok, now you have a good grasp of the framework and how it works, it might be a good time to read the manual for Oracle ADF - "Developing Fusion Web Applications with Oracle Application Development Framework". This is the complete guide and you should read it to get more insight into the framework, best practices, and general guidelines. Note that the ADF documentation libraries has additional books about ADF Faces, ADF Desktop Integration, Administration guides and more.

Step 5 - Become an ADF Architect

Now that you know how to build ADF apps, it's time to learn how to architect more complex projects and work in a team environment. The resource to learn from is the ADF Architecture Square - where we discuss best practices, development guidelines, and most importantly how to architect a complete complex application. Here you can find docs and also a link to a set of videos on the ADF Architecture Square YouTube Channel. If you only have time to watch one video from that channel - go for the "Angels in the ADF Architecture". By the way, if you are looking for a platform for your team to collaborate on while building Oracle ADF applications - check out the Oracle Developer Cloud Service and the integration it provides with JDeveloper.

Step 6 - Join the Community

As you continue on your development road, there will be times when you'll want to know "How do I do X?" or "Why do I get this error?". The nice thing is that since many other developers are working with ADF, you can leverage their collective knowledge. Got a question - type it into google and it is likely that you'll find blog entries and youtube videos that explain how to solve your issue.

A great place to search for answers is the indexed collection of ADF and JDeveloper blog articles. Search by keywords or topics and you'll likely get great samples to help you achieve your task.

Still can't find the answer? Ask your question on our ADF community forum, just don't forget to follow the basic rules of asking questions on the forum.

Things keep evolving in the world of Oracle ADF, so to keep up to speed you should follow JDeveloper on Twitter for the latest news.

Over the years Oracle ADF has proven itself to be a great framework for enterprise applications, and each new release introduced further capabilities and simplifications - If you are just now joining the world of Oracle ADF you are in for a great ride. Have fun.

Categories: Development

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