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Andrejus Baranovski

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ADF 11.1.1.9 Goodies - Conveyor Belt Component and Alta UI

Sat, 2015-05-23 09:59
It doesn't seem to be announced, but newly released ADF 11.1.1.9 is shipped with Alta UI support. All you need to do, is to set alta skin name in trinidad config file. This enables applications running on ADF 11g platform to leverage new Oracle UI layout and to be prepared for ADF 12c upgrade. Besides Alta UI, there are several new UI components, one of them is Scrollable Bar (ConveyorBelt) - Displaying Components in a Scrollable Bar. This is simple, but quite useful component - I'm going to demonstrate how it works.

Conveyor Belt is able to render elements horizontally or vertically. This is perfect component to render key information, user could select one of the items available on the belt and get more info fetched. This is how it looks like - conveyor of employee pictures with first/last names, rendered in the vertical belt on the left:


If there are more items in the conveyor belt, than could fit into visible UI part - user could scroll (right/left and down/up). Here I scroll down and select another employee, his detail data is displayed in the main section:


As you could notice, UI is displayed using Alta skin. This is configured in trinidad file:


Here is the structure for implemented conveyor belt, items in the conveyor are stamped dynamically through ADF UI iterator component. Java Script client/server listeners are responsible to process item selection and keep detail info in synch for the selected employee:


This is the source code structure for conveyor belt UI implementation, based on the structure from above:


Conveyor item selection is processed in the server listener method, VO current row is set based on the selected key:


If you want to try it yourself, download sample application - ConveyorBeltApp.zip.

ADF and Two-Way WebSocket Communication Architecture

Sat, 2015-05-16 05:02
This post is based on WebSockets and ADF, topic described in the previous post - WebSocket Integration with ADF for PPR Request Monitoring. I would like to look into it from technical architecture perspective and split WebSockets server logic into separate application deployed on WebLogic. WebSocket is two-way (bidirectional) communication channel, this allows to send and received data at the same time. I'm going to demonstrate how it works with my sample application.

It is best to explain how WebSocket works, with a live demo - you can watch recorded screencast. I'm using Twitter stream, you should see how many tweets are coming in for music category. Each tweet location is sent through WebSocket channel to ADF page, where it is rendered on the UI, through Java Script. ADF UI performance is measured in Java Script and logged back to the server through the same WebSocket channel. Tweet locations are coming from the server to ADF UI and ADF UI performance statistics traveling back to the server, at the same time:


I'm pretty amazed, how WebSocket transfers data - you should see how quick output text value is changing in ADF UI.

Download sample application - ADFAltaApp_v5.zip. Below diagram describes the main idea of this example:


There are two applications deployed on WebLogic 12c server. WebSocket server side application is listening for Twitter stream and sends data to the WebSocket client running in ADF UI. Logged performance data in ADF UI is sent back to WebSocket server side application.

Twitter stream handler is implemented as a servlet. It listens for every tweet received for the given topic and invokes WebSocket method to send data to the client:


Data is sent to the client using WebSocket API (library is available out of the box in WebLogic 12c and JDeveloper 12c). Incoming message is handled by another method - processMessage. This method accepts complex type, sent from ADF UI in JSON format:


Make sure to define WAR deployment profile for WebSocket project, this must be deployed as part of EAR. There should be deployment profile set, later referenced from WebSocket client:


WebSocket client runs in Java Script, there is onMessage function to handle incoming data. Here I'm simply setting newly received text as value for the ADF output text component:


ADF output text is empty initially, value is populated on runtime through WebSocket:


WebSocket communication from ADF UI to WebSocket server side is initiated in Java Script. PPR request timing data is written to JSON format and sent over WebSocket channel:

WebSocket Accelerated Live Data Synchronization for MAF

Mon, 2015-05-11 02:42
New generation Mobile and Web applications are going to use WebSockets. This is one of the fastest and convenient ways to transfer JSON formatted data from the server to the client and back. Huge advantage - server could initiate data synchronisation request and deliver JSON messages directly to the client. You should read my previous post about detail information how to configure MAF with WebSocket - Oracle MAF and WebSockets Integration - Live Twitter Stream.

In this post I would like to describe, how to integrate further information received through WebSocket with MAF components. I will use MAF Tree Map UI component to display live data for Tweets locations.

Below you could see screen recording - MAF Tree Map is getting refreshed automatically, each time when update through WebSocket channel is being received. This is amazing, how fast data through WebSocket channel is coming. In this test, MAF is handling around 1 update per second, received from WebSocket:


Let's look how it is implement behind the scenes. There is MAF Tree Map UI component, this is regular MAF component to render graph visualisation:


UI component is based on Data Bindings, collection is initialized from Data Control method:


Method handling data update from WebSocket is responsible to update data collection - it invokes helper method, where data collection is re-constructed. Standard Refresh Provider is helping to repaint data displayed on the UI:


Simple and effective. Download sample application - AltaMobileApp_v2.zip.

Oracle MAF and WebSockets Integration - Live Twitter Stream

Wed, 2015-05-06 23:26
Oracle MAF and WebSockets - I will describe how it works together. WebSockets is a protocol providing full-duplex communication channel over a TCP connection. This channel is interactive (communication is both ways) and we can send messages from the server to the client (MAF application running on the device). There is no need to use push notifications, WebSockets provide JSON support and allow to send complex payload data. In a way it competes with REST, however REST is different with request is being initiated by the client. WebSockets data is received automatically - there is no need to trigger any event by the client.

I have implemented sample MAF application with WebSockets integration, you can download it here - AltaMobileApp_v1.zip. Finance screen in the application contains MAF output text component. This component displays latest data received through WebSockets channel. Server side is listening for live Twitter Stream updates and sends each tweet location over WebSockets to the MAF application. See how it works in this screen recording:


WebSockets communication is not blocking MAF application functionality, it runs in the separate thread. User can navigating between MAF screens, run different actions and WebSockets delivers data in parallel.

Sample applications is based on two parts - server side WebSockets implementation with Twitter Stream listener and client side MAF application with WebSockets client.

Twitter Stream is handled with Twitter4J API, JAR's are included with the sample. You would need to provide your own Twitter account details, access keys could be retrieved for your account from Twitter developer portal. Make sure to obtain these keys, before running sample application:


New message from Twitter Stream is received by listener method - onStatus. I'm listening for all the tweets around the world, related to corporate keyword. Once there will be new tweet related to this topic, onStatus listener will be notified. In the listener method, I'm retrieving tweet location and and initiating WebSockets communication:


Method in WebSockets implementation - notifyClient, sends text message to the client (JSON message is supported as well):


Listener for Twitter Stream is started automatically, when application is deployed. This is done through servlet initialisation:


On the client side - MAF application is configured to receive automatic notifications through WebSockets channel. Implementation for WebSockets listener is very similar with the regular ADF Faces - it is done through JavaScript. MAF feature is registered with JavaScript file:


JavaScript contains all required methods for WebSockets communication. Here we open WebSockets channel with connectSocket function and further listen for the new messages/notifications with onMessage method. My goal is to update MAF components with the new data received through WebSockets. For this reason, I'm invoking Java method from onMessage JavaScript function and passing payload data (recently received tweet location):


Invoked Java method - processWebSocketMessage is responsible to update MAF bindings with the new data. Data Bindings class contains standard MAF propertyListener implementation, which ensures data refresh on MAF UI:


MAF output text on the UI displays recent data received through WebSockets channel:

SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast May 8th 16:00 CET

Wed, 2015-04-29 12:49
Save the date for the Webcast below - make sure to attend, if you don't want to miss SOA & BPM news.
SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast May 8th 16:00 CETJoin us for our monthly SOA & BPM Partner Community Webcast. We will give you an update on our SOA Suite 12c, Integration Cloud Service offerings and our community activities.


Speakers:
Vikas Anand
Jürgen Kress

Schedule: May 8th 2014 16:00-16:45 CET (Berlin time)

Attendance Information:
Join Webcast or dial in Call ID: 4070776 and Call Passcode: 333111
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You can join the Conference by clicking on the link: Join Webcast  (audio will play over your computer speakers or headset). Visit our SOA Partner Community Technology Webcast series here.

WebSocket Integration with ADF for PPR Request Monitoring

Tue, 2015-04-28 10:28
WebSocket is a protocol enabling communication over TCP connection. Communication is interactive, meaning data can be sent both ways - from the server to the Web client and back. Data is sent through WebSocket channel, without using using regular HTTP. This means we can enable communication between server and Web client without consuming bandwidth from HTTP. WebLogic 12c is shipped with required libraries for WebSocket support, we can use this protocol straight away in ADF 12c. WebSocket supports JSON format, this allows to send and receive JSON formatted data, just the same as REST. In this post I'm going to describe how WebSocket could be used, to report PPR request time measured on the Web client (Monitoring PPR Request Time on ADF UI Client Side), back to the server.

JDeveloper 12c allows to create WebSocket project, this can be done in the existing ADF Fusion Web application:


Required libraries are not added automatically, developer needs to add them manually. If you are going to compile sample application for this post - make sure to set correct path for JSON library, otherwise project will fail compilation:


Below you can see example of server side WebSocket code. Class is annotated with ServerEndpoint path and contains various methods to listen for WebSocket events. One of the methods - processMessage with annotation OnMessage, this method is invoked when message from the Web client is received. I'm just printing out PPR request time measured on the client and sent through WebSocket channel:


WebSocket is using JSON format for the data message. Data structure must be defined by the POJO class:


In order to be able to use this structure with WebSocket, helper classes for encoding and decoding must be defined. Here is the example for encoder, it converts data structure to JSON String:


Decoder converts data back from JSON String to the data structure defined by POJO class:


Encoder/decoder is defined in WebSocket class annotation:


Let's see what is required to be implemented on the Web client side. Here we have simple Java Script code, where WebSocket connection is established - connection between Web client (browser) and server:


WebSocket connection is opened on main page load, by invoking Java Script method from clientListener:


Java Script function responsible for monitoring, sends measured PPR request time back to the server through WebSocket connection. See details in the sample application developed for this post:


This is how it works on runtime - user invokes PPR request, by pressing a button:


Server receives a message with information about PPR request time measured on the client. This message is received through the WebSocket, without using any bandwidth from HTTP channel. See printed message below:


Make sure to compile WebSocket project, before you run sample application.


Download sample application here - ADFAltaApp_v4.zip.

Monitoring PPR Request Time on ADF UI Client Side

Fri, 2015-04-17 12:55
We can measure how long it takes to process request on the server side, however it is equally important to measure how long PPR request takes on the client side. Mainly because this will be a key factor for application performance exposed to the end user. There is relatively easy approach in JSF 2.0 to measure PPR request time on client side - with a special ajax tag. ADF 11g R2 and ADF 12c are based on JSF 2.0, this means we can use such tag and measure request performance. Read in my previous post how to monitor page load time in ADF UI client - Monitoring Page Load Time on ADF UI Client Side.

Here is the example of ajax tag. It provides special property called onevent, this property points to custom JavaScript method, which will be invoked by the framework when PPR request starts and ends:


Ajax tag can be used for various ADF UI components, initiating request. Below you can see example of ADF Faces button configured with onevent monitoring, it points to custom JavaScript monitor method:


JavaScript monitor method is invoked automatically, when request starts and succeeds. This means we can get start and end time, calculate total time taken to process PPR request from click to rendered response:


I would like to emphasise importance of this approach, based on example of ADF TF opening. Task Flow is a server side concept, on runtime its all is converted to HTML and rendered in the browser. When user clicks on the button, to render ADF TF content, he waits until it is initialised on the server side, business logic is executed and finally response is rendered. My example contains Method Call activity with delay code intentionally, to demonstrate how PPR request time measurement works:


ExecuteDelay method call invokes Java method, where thread is paused for 5 seconds:


Let's see how it works on runtime. Home page contains a list of employees, there is team hierarchy link available for each employee. On user click, it loads ADF TF with Hierarchy viewer (ADF TF explained above, with thread delay):


PPR request time starts when user clicks on the link and ends when ADF TF UI fragment content is rendered. This gets close to 6 seconds (there is added 5 seconds delay time from TF method call). We can measure, how long it really takes to see the content for the user, starting from the first click:


As soon as PPR request is completed, Hierarchy viewer component renders team structure:


Navigation back to the list is measured as well, it takes below 1 second:


PPR requests time for Save/Cancel/Back buttons in edit screen is measured in the same way:


Download sample application with implementation of described approach - ADFAltaApp_v3.zip.

Monitoring Page Load Time on ADF UI Client Side

Wed, 2015-04-15 03:26
In certain situations, it might be useful to monitor ADF page load time. This is pretty easy to achieve with Navigation Timing API and Java Script. Navigation Timing API is supported by modern browsers and allows to retrieve client side load time. It takes into account data transfer time and actual rendering in the browser - real time it took for a user to see the content.

We could use ADF clientListener operation with load type, to identify when ADF UI is loaded. This listener should be added to the ADF UI document tag and it will be invoked at the end of page rendering. Through clientListener, we could invoke our custom JavaScript method, where we could calculate page load time on ADF UI client side:


The most important thing here, is to get page load start time. This value is retrieved from Navigation Timing API (mentioned above) - performance.timing.navigationStart. The rest is easy - we can get load time:


This is how it looks like on runtime. When I recompile ADF application and redeploy it on the server, first load is obviously slower. ADF UI is rendered on the client side (starting from page load request) in 10 seconds (look at top right corner):


Second access is a way faster - page load on the client side happens in 1 second:


You can test it yourself, download sample application (redsam/welcome1) - ADFAltaApp_v2.zip.

Simple (Effective) Refresh Approach for ADF Regions

Wed, 2015-04-08 12:56
I often hear developer asking about how to refresh different regions on the same page, when specific event happens in one of the regions - to refresh dependent regions. Usually developers would like to use something more simple than Contextual Event approach. There is more simple approach, may be it doesn't work for all the possible use cases - but it does it job, when just refresh is needed. This approach is based on dummy parameter value, being used as dependent region input parameter, with refresh option set to be ifNeeded.

For the sample test case, I'm using ADF 12c application (SimpleReloadRegionApp.zip). This application contains two AM's, to simulate two Data Controls to be used in separate regions:


Fragment from the first region, generates refresh event, when Save button is pressed. For this purpose, I have registered Property Listener to update flag variable. This variable value is initialised from refreshToken method, available in RefreshHelperBean:


Bean method is very simple, it takes current timestamp value and returns it to String. This value always will be changed and this ensures dependent region refresh:


Make sure to set input parameter for the region TF you want to refresh, this should be simple parameter of type String:


TF must call Execute operation, this will force to reload VO rowset data, before loading the fragment:


In the main page, where region is consumed, change refresh condition to ifNeeded and set refreshFlag parameter to point to the variable initialized in the first region (by property listener):


There are two regions rendered on the UI. Once I change data in the top region (form component) and press Save, second region below is refresh automatically and it fetches latest available data from DB:

Indicator for Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator

Fri, 2015-04-03 12:33
You should check my previous post about Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA). There I describe how to optimise MAF performance for REST service calls, allow user to continue working with the mobile application, without locking the screen until Web Service response arrives. Steven Davelaar have documented how it works, you can read it in his blog - Calling Web Services in Background Using MAF 2.1.

I have updated sample application from previous post, to include indicator for AMPA background service call status tracking. Updated sample application - MobileServiceBusApp_v8.zip.

AMPA provides application scope variable, which acts as a flag and indicates when background service call is executed. Based on this flag, we could conditionally display animated GIF image, this will help user to understand if background service call still runs:


When user is searching and request is being processed in background, he will see rotating status indicator in the top right corner:


Until data is being returned from background task, user could go to another screen and monitor when request is completed, to see the latest data:


Once background task completes, indicator disappears:

Automatic ADF Popup Opening on Fragment Load

Sun, 2015-03-29 08:56
I had a post about opening ADF Popup on page load - Opening ADF PopUp on Page Load. Approach is quite straightforward, developer needs to use showPopupBehavior operation with appropriate trigger type. When it comes to ADF Popup opening on fragment load, implementation is a bit more complex. There is a known method to implement hidden text field and in the getter method call your custom logic - getter will be executed when fragment loads. However, this is not very efficient, you will need to add condition to distinguish between first and subsequent calls to the getter (it will be executed multiple times). I will describe in this post different approach - using ADF poll component and forcing it to execute only once after fragment load.

Here you can download sample application - FragmentPopUpLoadApp.zip. This sample implements two UI tabs. Each of the tabs renders ADF region. First region displays information about all employees - tree map with salary information:


Automatic popup opening is implemented in the second region - Employees By Department tab. As soon as user opens this tab, popup is load to select department. Data in the region is filtered, based on department selected in the popup:


Filtered data after selection was made in automatically opened popup:


Popup in the fragment is loaded on the first load by ADF poll component. Poll component is set with short interval of 10 milliseconds. During its first execution it will call Java listener method and in addition JavaScript client listener will be invoked. Inside JavaScript client listener, we disable ADF poll component by setting its interval to be negative. This is how ADF poll executes only once and then it stops:


Here is Java listener method, invoked by ADF poll component - it loads the popup:


ADF poll is stopped after its first execution. However, we need to ensure it will be started again - if user re-opens the same tab. For this purpose I have implemented conditional ADF region activation - region is de-activated when user navigates away from the tab. Tab disclosure listener updates helper variable to track which tab becomes active:


Disclosure listener updates page flow scope variable - forceActivate:


This variable is used in the region definition - region is active when tab is selected, and inactive otherwise:

Background REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator

Sun, 2015-03-22 06:35
REST service transfers light data, but service execution time could bring significant delay to the enterprise mobile application. I have already introduced you to the A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA) in previous post - REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator. Based on AMPA author - Steven Davelaar suggestions, I will post today updated application, where REST service call will be handled in background. This will allow mobile user to continue working with the MAF application, while REST call is being processed in background thread.

Here you can download updated sample application - MobileServiceBusApp_v7.zip. Remote read in background is configurable through AMPA persistence mapping, I have changed it to be false - let's see how it works for slow REST service execution:


Data Control method is executing (sequential in this example) remote findAll operation through AMPA, to fetch employees data. Data collection is loaded to the UI, after service execution is completed:


Server side ADF BC VO is set to wait 30 seconds (waiting for 30 seconds after VO was executed), before completing SOAP response. This allows to simulate slow REST service execution and check how MAF mobile application behaves with sequential service call:


Executing search operation over slow REST operation blocks entire MAF mobile application. User can't navigate to other screens and is locked into current screen, until response comes. This is how it looks like, when I changed search criteria - mobile application waits for the response:


Obviously this is inappropriate, because it blocks application and user can't continue his work. Let's test with AMPA configured to execute REST calls in background - remoteReadInBackground = true:


Data Control method responsible to execute REST action is refactored. I'm only starting remote findAll operation - not waiting it to complete. AMPA generated service class EmployeeService is changed to include additional constructor, where I'm passing instance of Data Control class and a flag to prevent auto query. Here is applyFilter method from Data Control class, it call REST service in background, through AMPA:


AMPA generated class is changed with overriden method refreshEntityList. This method is called automatically by AMPA, when background REST call is completed. Here I'm calling Data Control class method, responsible to refresh UI and display data fetched from the background service:


Data Control class method responsible for UI refresh - it updates Data Control collection and invokes synch with UI:


I will describe a test I have completed, with REST service execution in background. Perform search action with a parameter:


ADF BC on server side executes VO with SQL statement, there is a wait time of 30 seconds:


MAF mobile application is not blocked anymore, as it was with sequential REST service execution. User can navigate to other screen and do different actions:


Once ADF BC VO completes execution and SOAP service returns response, Service Bus is transforming SOAP response to REST. Mobile application receives data and UI refresh happens, to present latest changes. User can view the changes, once he is back to the screen:


In the same way, user could run another search:


While search is running, user could view details for present data:


After returning back to the search list, results for the new search query are displayed - data from REST service call executed in background:


User could load details screen and view the data:

ADF BC Property Set to Group Attribute Hints

Tue, 2015-03-17 12:35
There is one ADF BC component not mentioned often - Property Set. This is a bag of properties/hints, it can be applied for EO/VO attributes. Frequently used hints can be defined in Property Set once, without repeating the same for each attribute. This simplifies maintenance, if there will be a change required in the future - much easier to change it in single place. I will show below a practical example, where Property Set is applied for EO attribute to define a date type.

You can create Property Set with ADF BC wizard:


Property Set creation is really simple - provide a name and package:


It comes with a section to define Custom Properties. I will add two properties required to set date format - FMR_FORMAT and FMT_FORMATTER. I will be using EU format for the date (dd-MM-yyyy). The advantage of Property Set - you can define multiple sets for different date formats and apply them when required:


Select EO/VO attribute and choose Property Set, it will appear in the choice list:


Attribute is assigned with domain, pointing to the Property Set:


This is how it looks on UI - Hire Date field is correctly formatted, based on the format mask defined in Property Set:


Download sample application - PropertySetApp.zip.

REST Service Access with A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator

Mon, 2015-03-16 14:40
A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator (AMPA) works on top of Oracle Mobile Application Framework (MAF) and provides tools to simplify consumption of REST services. It enables transparent persistent layer usage on the device with the option of synchronising offline data with the server side. In this post, I will be testing AMPA in the context of the use case implemented previously - MAF 2.1 Alta Mobile UI and Oracle Mobile Suite. Working MAF application, where REST service calls are coded by hand, will be changed to fetch REST service data through AMPA - reusing existing Data Control. This is unusual approach, most of the tutorials related to AMPA describe end-to-end scenario, where Data Control is generated on top of AMPA service class and UI is generated with AMPA wizard. Mobile UI in most of the cases will be custom made and we rarely generating it. This is why it is important to explain, how to use AMPA with custom UI and Data Control.

You could read more about AMPA and find installation instructions in Steven Davelaar post - Getting Started with the A-Team Mobile Persistence Accelerator.

I will be using my sample application from the MAF 2.1 Alta UI post mentioned above. You can download application updated with AMPA support here (this includes ADF BC SOAP service, OSB transformation to REST and MAF application with AMPA) - MobileServiceBusApp_v6.zip.

As soon as REST connection is defined, AMPA wizard offers you to define REST resources. In my case I have to different resources, though working with the same Employees data schema. Both require to provide parameter:


Wizard is going to ask you to provide sample parameters to retrieve a response from REST resources. This is how AMPA retrieves metadata required to generate service representation in MAF:


Data Objects will be constructed automatically for each resource path. In my case, both resources are based on the same schema Employees. If this is the case for you, make sure to change the names in the wizard to be unique, otherwise AMPA fails to generate proper SQL scripts and service classes.

In this example I don't want to persist any data on the device. My use case requires to retrieve latest data from the server, therefore there is no need to keep a copy on the device - this is why Persistent checkbox is not set:


Next you will get similar wizard as in ADF BC, where all attributes for the service will be listed along with types, etc.:


I don't have any create/update/delete operations in the example, therefore only mapping present if for find operation:


Both REST resources were defined with attributes. We need to set the values later, for this purpose we could define ELExpression value provider for the attribute and type actual expression into Literal Value field. You could use any scope, I'm using applicationScope in this example. Variable defined by EL expression must be initialised before executing REST operation - this will be done later, in the code:


Six easy steps and AMPA persistence layer for MAF is generated. Let's take a quick look, what was actually generated. There is SQLite script with on device DB structure - two different tables will be created, each per REST service defined in the beginning:


In this example, I'm not really using on device DB, tables are not mandatory. Persistence mapping file is generated, this is where on device persistence structure and REST service mapping is defined. This mapping is used as a metadata resource to describe how data retrieved from REST service should be translated into on device persistence layer. I have set the option not to persist data, this will only retrieve it:


AMPA does a remote read in background by default - this means it reads data from REST, populates it into local SQLite DB and doesn't wait until operation is completed. This is good for performance optimisation reasons in some use cases, but is not suitable, when we want to see data immediately in the same request (especially when we are integrating AMPA into our own custom service class). Remote read in background can be turned off through persistence mapping:


Service class is generated, it extends from AMPA service. We could generate Data Control on top of this class and use it from MAF UI. However, I would like to integrate it into existing service class and consume from existing Data Control:


You could generate Data Control through JDEV menu, as displayed below.


In my case, I have Data Control already - generated on top of ServiceHelper class, I will reuse it. Here is the service class - ServiceHelper. In order to use AMPA generated service class and POJO types from existing service class, I have changed types for service class variables. Names and POJO structure remains the same, this means Data Control will continue to work:


Method responsible to search for employees by name is changed to invoke AMPA functionality. Instead of calling REST service and transforming response - I'm initialising EmployeeService generated by AMPA and calling findAllEmployeesRemote method. Remote method works with REST service, this is what we need - always fetch latest available data from the service:


You should notice how REST service variable is initialized - through EL Expression in application scope. This is the same expression as we have defined in resource mapper.

Here you can see how it look on UI. List of employees is filtered and displayed on the mobile device screen. Data from REST service is retrieved through AMPA, UI remains exactly the same as it was implemented in the previous version of the application:


Very important thing to mention - MAF Data Control is able to cache data by itself. Once you fetch data and if you don't require offline support, MAF Data Control is able to keep fetched rows in memory, without requiring them from the service.

For example, we fetch a set of rows with David Austin in the list:


There are two different MAF fragments (List and Edit), attached to the same Data Control. When we navigate to Edit and back to List, there is no REST call executed - MAF is using previously fetched data from Data Control (there is no need to use AMPA to handle such use cases):


Detail data for David Audit is retrieved from MAF Data Control:


You need to ensure - getter in service class implementing Data Control is not triggering a call to the REST service. REST service call must be invoked from Method Call, before MAF fragment is loaded - this will allow to prepare data in advance (see Task Flow diagram above):

Oracle Fusion Middleware Partner Community Award for Outstanding ACM/BPM Contribution 2015

Mon, 2015-03-09 11:38
We have received award for Outstanding ACM/BPM Contribution 2015. This award was given to me and my colleague - Danilo Schmiedel, for successful work in joint ACM/BPM and ADF projects, by Oracle Fusion Middleware Partner Community. Thanks and really proud to be a part of the community !


I'm looking forward to share interesting ideas about ADF/ACM/BPM/Mobile through this blog in the future.

Invoking REST Service from Oracle ACM Java Activity

Fri, 2015-03-06 05:56
In this post I will show you, how to call REST service from ACM Java activity class method. This could be useful in the situations, when you would like to have programmatic ACM activity integrated with REST service data. We could access ACM payload data from within the method overriden in the class implementing Case Activity Callback.

ACM activity implemented on top of Java class, contains the same properties and configuration as the regular one. You could define input/output data, execution properties, etc.:


Here is the Java code to invoke REST service from the Java class implementing ACM activity. I'm giving an example to parse ACM payload and access Last Name attribute. REST service is invoked through a library packaged with FMW 12c:


One important hint - you must place ACM activity class under SOA/src path (by default it goes into SOA/SCA-INF/src). This will ensure class will be compiled and executable on runtime:


REST Client library is referenced from FMW 12c installation, no need to add any external libraries:


Sample application implements Cancel Hotel Booking activity, the one which is based on Java class. It executes and calls a method:


Here is the output - Last Name printed out from the payload and REST service call result:


Here you can download sample application, this contains both REST service and ACM examples - HotelBookingProcessing_v2.zip. REST service application implementation - ADF BC Range Paging and REST Pagination. ACM application implementation - Adaptive Case Management 12c and ADF Human Tasks.

MAF 2.1 Alta Mobile UI - Running On iPad Device

Tue, 2015-02-24 14:03
I have installed MAF application (described and available for download here: MAF 2.1 Alta Mobile UI and Oracle Mobile Suite) on iPad device, iOS 8 and would like to share couple of tips and tricks about it. I was installing on iPhone/iPad previous MAF versions (it was called ADF Mobile) - ADF Mobile - Live on iPhone Device. It is always forth to read Oracle Developer guide for MAF - 27.4.2 How to Deploy an Application to an iOS-Powered Device.

You would need to get Apple Development Provisioning Profile (this costs around $100), in order to be able to install MAF application on iPad device for testing. Provisioning Profile creation process is streamlined in iOS 8 and is simple to follow. Here is the example of our Apple Development Provisioning Profile entry, this can be download and installed on Mac OS with one click:


Sample MAF application I'm going to deploy is connecting to the REST service. Make sure to set proper IP address for the REST connection entry in MAF. IP must point to the Service Bus service with published REST connection:


JDeveloper 12c is fetching Provisioning Profile information automatically. You only need to copy paste Common Name from iOS development certificate into Signing Identity field (created and registered during Provisioning Profile creation process):


Make sure to specify the same Application Bundle Id prefix as the one registered in Provisioning Profile. Documentation states you can test MAF application on iPhone/iPad device only in Debug mode, however this is not true - it works fine in Release mode as well:


Thats it with configuration. Choose to deploy MAF application into IPA distribution package:


IPA distribution package file must be generated in deploy folder. Double click on it and it will get installed into iTunes:


Open iPhone/iPad section in iTunes and go to the App category. You should see your new MAF application listed there. Click on Install button and then press Synch - this will install application into the device:


Application is successfully loaded and dashboard screen is displayed. Service Bus provides REST data to the MAF application running on the iPad, data is rendered in Tree Map graph (MAF component):


User could switch to Employees screen:


Alta UI look and feel - we could search for employees and browse through a list with shortcuts:


Switch to cards view, instead of default list view:


Select employee who is a manager:


Pie graph with compensation of managed employees is displayed:


List of managed employees is also present:


I have tested AirPlay and connected iPad with Mac. This is useful to display iPad screen on projector, when you want to demonstrate your app to the audience. AirPlay synchronisation works pretty well, without configuration headache (you may require additional utility application for this). You must enable mirroring on your iPad device:


We are getting iPad screen view on the Mac. This is pretty useful for the presentations and demos:

Red Samurai ADF Performance Audit Tool v 3.4 - ADF Task Flow Statistics with Oracle DMS Servlet Integration

Mon, 2015-02-23 12:38
We have integrated Red Samurai ADF Performance Audit Tool with Oracle DMS Spy Servlet. Integration is dynamic and doesn't require any extra configuration. It brings out of the box information about ADF Task Flow usage and performance. This means we are analysing from now on not only ADF BC performance data, but ADF Controller data also.

DMS Spy Servlet context is accessed in certain intervals and we are not only displaying DMS data, but storing it inside our audit tables. This allows to keep historical data and preserve it between WLS restarts - this is not possible with DMS Spy Servlet alone.

New tree map graph displays ADF Task Flow usage in the application - larger box, more frequently Task Flow is accessed:


Graph is clickable, user could select a box and detail data for the Task Flow will be displayed. We are displaying a number of Active/Maximum Active Task Flows over time. Average load time is logged and displayed - this allows to identify Task Flows with slow performance:


Here you can check information about previous v 3.3 version - Red Samurai ADF Performance Audit Tool v 3.3 - Audit Improvements.

ADF BC Range Paging and REST Pagination

Thu, 2015-02-19 13:14
In this post I would like to explore and integrate two thing - ADF BC Range Paging and REST service pagination. It would inefficient to retrieve entire set of data in the REST service, ideally should be available option to specify number of rows and range number to fetch. ADF BC allows to query VO in Range Paging mode - SQL query will be constructed with row numbers, to query data in certain range of rows (this allows to fetch less data from DB). We could combine this with REST service and provide light interface to access data.

Here you can download sample application - RestADFBCApp.zip (compiled with ADF 12c). I'm translating ADF BC VO structure into HashMap, this allows to publish unified structure through REST, without creating a separate POJO object. There is a special generic method called toHashMap, it iterates over VO attributes and constructs a HashMap with attribute names and values:


Generic AM method accepts parameters for page number and range size. Here we enforce Range Paging mode for VO and using ADF BC API methods to scroll to the certain page and set the range size (number of rows to fetch). It is important to get results from default rowset, otherwise ADF BC will generate a separate default SQL query:


ViewController project contains a list of references to the REST and Jersey related libraries, these extra libraries are required to transform HashMap to the REST response:


Here is the REST method. I'm accessing ADF BC Application Module and invoking custom method, with range size and page number coming from the REST request. Result is a list of HashMaps - a set of VO rows:


Make sure there is Jersey servlet defined in web.xml, REST request will not work without it:


Here is the example, where I perform a request through REST for rangePage = 1 and rangeSize = 10. This means 10 rows from the first page of rows are fetched:


You should check SQL query in the log. REST request from above generates a special SQL with ROWNUM. This means we are retrieving less data from DB, only data we need to display in the current page:


MAF 2.1 Alta Mobile UI and Oracle Mobile Suite

Mon, 2015-02-09 12:19
This post is about Alta Mobile UI and MAF 2.1. I was using Oracle Work Better mobile application as a reference, along with Alta Mobile UI Design Guidelines. This is based on my previous posts about Oracle Mobile Suite and MAF 2.1 integration, read more here - Oracle Mobile Suite - Web Service Performance Optimisation with Result Caching. You could also use Alta UI 12c with regular ADF Web applications, check more here - Custom ADF Application with New ADF 12c Alta UI.

Sample application - MobileServiceBusApp_v5.zip (contains ADF BC SOAP Web Service, Oracle Mobile Suite SOAP to REST transformation and MAF 2.1 application with Alta Mobile UI) implements a dashboard. Component to visualise amounts and values comes out of the box with MAF (iPad view):


User could open a springboard and select Employees option in the sample application:


Here we can search for employees by first name/last name and bring results as a list:


Optionally user could switch to cards view, to display the same results in different way:


You could click on employee icon - this will load details screen and bring additional info:


Steven King is a manager, he manages Executive department and there are two team members reporting to him. Compensation graph can be displayed for team members:


A list of team members is displayed in the third tab:


There is MAF 2.1 Deck component in Employees search page, it allows to switch between a list and cards view:


Employee details page is rendered with a help of MAF 2.1 Deck component as well, along with Select Button component to display tab UI and navigate between Detail, Compensation and Team sections:


You could check how these pages are implemented in the sample app provided above.