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Andrejus Baranovski

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Updated: 16 hours 13 min ago

End-To-End ADF Cloud Deployment Process

Fri, 2014-08-29 11:37
ADF and ADF BC perfectly runs on Oracle Java Cloud. You could deploy regular ADF application straight away from familiar JDeveloper environment without any hassle. With this blog post I would like to walk through the process of migrating DB model to the cloud and deploying ADF application (enabled with ADF Security) to the cloud.

Here you can download sample application - TreeComponentsCloud.zip. This application is deployed and runs on Oracle Java Cloud, accessible through this link. Online access will be available until my Oracle Java Cloud trial subscription expires (in a month or so). You can login using following credentials - username: redsam, password: We1come@ and identity domain: ltredsamuraictrial99050.

First of all, we should prepare data model - basically you could migrate your local database to the cloud (including data) using JDeveloper wizards. Database Cart wizard could be used for this purpose, simply add all required tables to the cart and set a checkbox to include the data:


You would need to enable SFTP access and note down specific SFTP connection details for Oracle Database Cloud, read more about it in Oracle Java Cloud documentation section Building the Data Model. I have defined Oracle Database Cloud connection in JDeveloper for SFTP access:


Data Model and data upload to the cloud is very seamless process - it does everything just with one click. Entire structure is packaged into archive and sent over to the cloud:


When migration process is completed, we could double check if data is in the cloud. You could expand Oracle Database Cloud connection in JDeveloper and browse through the tables, data should be accessible:


Next we should enable secure access in the cloud. Oracle Java Cloud supports regular ADF Security setup. However, to render Oracle Java Cloud login page, you must include additional security constraint into web.xml (read more about ADF Security in Configuring Security section from Oracle Java Cloud documentation). Here you can see security constraint implemented in sample application web.xml:


You should define regular ADF Security permission for page access. I'm using custom application role - AccountantAppRole:


There is enterprise role AccountantRole defined and mapped with application role from above. This enterprise role is also defined in Oracle Java Cloud service:


Finally there is user defined - redsam, the same user is defined in Oracle Java Cloud service. This user is mapped with AccountantRole enterprise role:


I have defined AccountantRole role under Users group in Oracle Java Cloud service:


This role is mapped with redsam user in the same Oracle Java Cloud service:


Deployment process is identical to the one deploying to local WebLogic server, you could use the same JDeveloper wizard - only select Oracle Cloud as target Application Server from the list:


Once application is deployed, you could login to Oracle Java Cloud service control (looks quite similar to Oracle Enterprise Manager) and check application status, etc.:


Let's do a test now. I will try to login with a user who do not have access to the application. Our sample application is protected by ADF Security, Oracle Java Cloud renders login screen automatically (no need to implement it in your custom application):


Application access will be reported as unauthorised, as expected:


Login with a valid user - redsam (see all login credentials listed in the beginning of this post):


We can access application now. Browse through tree structure and even render a colourful chart:

Session Schedule Information OpenWorld 2014 San Francisco

Tue, 2014-08-26 12:55
I have received my session schedule information for OpenWorld 2014. This year event is going to be quite busy with three sessions. Below you can check session titles along with times, looking forward to meet you in San Francisco !


Session ID: CON2623Session Title: Oracle ADF Development and Deployment to Oracle CloudVenue / Room: Moscone South - 270Date and Time: 10/1/14, 15:30 - 16:15
Session ID: CON3745 (together with Danilo Schmiedel)Session Title: Oracle Mobile Suite and Oracle Adaptive Case Management: A Strong Combination to Empower PeopleVenue / Room: Moscone West - 3018Date and Time: 10/1/14, 16:45 - 17:30
Session ID: CON2495Session Title: Data Caching Strategies for Oracle Mobile Application FrameworkVenue / Room: Marriott Marquis - Nob Hill C/DDate and Time: 10/2/14, 12:00 - 12:45

Transactional Data Caching for ADF Mobile MAF Application

Sun, 2014-08-24 00:20
I have described basic idea for data caching in ADF Mobile MAF application in my previous post - Data Caching Implementation for ADF Mobile MAF Application. Today I would like to extend similar solution to handle transactional data caching. Sample application displays list of tasks, user can update task status and description. These updates will be saved locally, until the next synchronisation time with the server.

Updated sample application with MAF mobile and server side implementations can be downloaded from here - MAFMobileLocalApp_v4.zip. User could select a task on his mobile device:


Update task status and description, these changes are stored locally in SQLite DB, no extra call is done to the Web Service at this time:


Changes for multiple tasks can be synchronised in batch. User could go and change different task without submitting previous changes to the Web Service, update task status:


Finally when user decided to synchronise his changes with the Web Service, he could use refresh option:


When synchronisation happens, we can see activity in the server side log. ADF BC executes update operation for submitted task, update for the first task:


Next is called update for the second task:


MAF task flow is updated for this use case, and is based on the task flow from application described in the previous post. We are not calling Web Service from the task flow method call anymore, this call is done programmatically, during refresh:


Web Service method in ADF BC is updated to check if row exists - if yes, data is updated. If row doesn't exist - no error is thrown, task list will be refreshed and latest changes will be displayed to the user on the mobile device. In the real application, you may inform user about the missing task:


Custom method is exposed as ADF BC Web Service method:


To understand how sample application works on MAF mobile side, we should refer to the task flow diagram. Edited changes are submitted to the local SQLite DB through updateTaskLocal method call. This call invokes Java method, where changes are stored locally in the list of tasks. In addition, record about latest task changes is stored in special table with change history:


We are checking in the change history, if the same task was already updated - if no, we are simply storing task ID. This would allow later during synchronisation to retrieve changed task details and update task first through Web Service, before fetching data. If task was already updated, there is no need to insert task ID again:


During data synchronisation, we are checking if there are any rows changed and stored locally. Only after this check is completed, task list data is refreshed and loaded from Web Service:


Changes for each updated task are synchronized through Web Service. Firstly, task ID is retrieved from changes history table. Using this ID, actual changed are fetched from SQLite DB and sent over Web Service to the server side ADF BC for update. Once all the changes are synchronised, local changes history is cleared:


Web Service call to update data through ADF BC is done programmatically, using MAF mobile helper class AdfmfJavaUtilities. We are constructing list of parameters with names, values and types - invoked method even doesn't need to be defined in the Page Definition, it will be referenced directly from the bindings:

Accessing ADF Iterator Binding from Value Change Listener

Tue, 2014-08-19 09:03
This is a quick hint about how to access ADF iterator binding from value change listener method. Let's say you have generic value change listener, reusable with any kind of input components and you want to get information about underlying ADF BC View Object structure in that listener. Value Change Listener provides access to UI Component, we should evaluate component expression and look up in the bindings for component binding name.

Here is the sample application - ADFIteratorAccessApp.zip. This applications comes with generic value change listener method implemented in the bean. I'm getting value property expression of input component and translating it into attribute name. With the attribute name, I can search in the binding container for attribute binding. From the attribute binding, is possible to retrieve mapped iterator object, iterator could provide information about ADF BC View Object structure:


It works pretty smooth, when generic value change listener is attached to the input component and user is changing value:


Iterator name is printed from generic value change listener, iterator object is retrieved dynamically through attribute definition mapping to iterator:

Data Caching Implementation for ADF Mobile MAF Application

Tue, 2014-08-12 13:19
If you are building mobile application with web service call integration, you must take into account data caching strategy. Without data caching, mobile application will try to establish too many connections with the server - this will use a lot of bandwidth and slow down mobile application performance. This post will be focused around the scenario of implementing simple data caching strategy. In my next post, I'm planning to review MAF persistence framework from Steven Davelaar - this framework is powerful and flexible. Simple data caching strategy makes sense for smaller use cases, when we don't need to use additional framework for persistence.

Data caching implementation in the sample application - MAFMobileLocalApp_v3.zip, is based on SQLite database local to the mobile application. The whole idea is pretty straightforward, there is a database and Web Service publishing data. Mobile application is reading and synchronising data through Web Service. Once data is fetched from the Web Service, it is stored in local cache, implemented by SQLite DB. For the subsequent requests, mobile application is going to use a cache, until user will decide when he wants to synchronise data from Web Service:


Sample application implements a Web Service, based on ADF BC module. This Web Service returns Tasks data (SQL script is included with the sample application):


Besides fetching the data, Web Service implements Task update method:


On the mobile application side, use case is implemented with a single Task Flow. Task list displays a list of tasks, user can edit a task and submit changes through Web Service. This change is immediately synchronised with local cache storage. User is able to refresh a list of tasks and synchronise it with a Web Service. During synchronisation it will clear local cache and populate again with the data returned from Web Service:


Data caching logic is handle in TaskDC class, Data Control is generated on top of this class, this makes it available through the bindings layer. Initially we check if cache is empty and load data from the Web Service, for the subsequent requests data is loaded from cache. Unless user wants to synchronise with Web Service and invokes refresh:


There is a method responsible for fetching data from Web Service and translating it to the Task list structure:


Data from cache retrieval is implemented in the separate method, we are querying data from local SQLite database:


When request hits TaskDC Data Control, we are checking if there are any rows in cache. If there are rows, call to Web Service is not made and rows are fetched from cache:


When user is synchronising with the Web Service, cache is cleared up and re-populated with the rows fetched from Web Service:


Update is synchronised with local cache, so there is no need to re-fetch entire data collection from Web Service:


If the local cache is empty and Web Service is invoked to fetch data, we can see this is Web Service log - it executes SQL. Later call to Web Service is not made, data loaded locally from SQLite database:


We can track update operation on the server side as well, Task details are updated using Task Id:


Initial load for the task list, this is what you should see if Web Service and MAF mobile applications runs correctly:


User could open specific task and edit task properties - changing status:


Task description could be modified:


All changes are saved through Web Service call and immediately synchronised with local SQLite database:


Selected task is updated, user is returned back to the list of tasks:


We could simulate data update on the server, lets change status for one of the tasks:


With refresh option invoked, data is synchronised on the mobile application side and local cache gets refreshed: