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3 Lessons from the Darkness for Cloud Developers: Design Patterns

Sun, 2015-11-22 08:39
Simplified UI UX Design Patterns eBook

A visit to a very unusual restaurant in Berlin reveals how following familiar and established user experience (UX) design patterns makes things easy for developers and users of cloud applications alike.

Meat-eaters may like to dive right in and consume the free Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns first. 

That UX Homework Assignment

Just returned from Berlin. While I was there I completed a reverse UX homework assignment given to me by Oracle partner Certus Solutions Cloud Services VP Debra Lilley (@debralilley): to visit a restaurant called Dunkel.

Dunkel Unsicht-Bar and Restaurant is where you are seated, served, and eat in total darkness (Dunkel means dark in German).

To begin with, you order from a set menu, in the light. Then, your assigned server appears, asks you to put your hands on their shoulders, and to follow you downstairs into the darkness of the restaurant itself.

I entered a world that was pitch black. Really. No smartphone UIs glowing, no luminous wristwatch dials twinkled, not even the blink of an optical heart rate monitor sensor on a smartwatch could be glanced anywhere

The server seats you, gives you a quick verbal orientation as to what is, and will be in front, of you.

All around me was the sound of other diners enjoying themselves.

Yet, I enjoyed one of the best vegetarian meals I’ve had in years.


Instagram pic of the awesome meal I had in Dunkel.

I had no problems whatsoever in finding or using the cutlery, the breadbasket, or eating any of the food served (four courses) in the total darkness. I ate as normal, at my usual pace, and when the meal was complete, I emerged into the light, again guided by the server, and without looking like I had been in a food fight. 

An amazing, one of a kind, experience! I even left a tip! Try it yourself if you visit Berlin.

Lessons from the Darkness

So, what are the UX lessons from Dunkel? Why was it that I could so easily eat there, without ending up in a complete mess, screaming for help?

  1. Firstly, keep it simple. I didn’t have to deal with, for example, a complex floral arrangement or other decoration shoved into the middle of the table. Everything in front of me was functional or consumable.
  2. Secondly, the experience must be what consumers  expect and be about things they are familiar with from everyday use. The layout of the cutlery (and yes, there was more than one spoon and no, I never used my hands), the positioning of the plates, even where my drink was placed, was familiar to me and as expected. They followed a pattern. No nasty surprises!
  3. Thirdly, if you do need to provide guidance, keep it short and about completing the task at hand, but encourage discovery. For example, my dessert was made of three parts (of crème of pomegranate, mango chili sauce, and homemade pralines) and served in one of those little swing-top glass bottles you need to flip open. But, again, no issue in consuming the lot.

Keeping things simple, familiar,  providing concise task guidance and playing on a sense of discovery is an experiential approach also evident in the simplified UIs in Oracle’s Cloud Applications. The UX follows design patterns.

Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns

The Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns for Release 10 eBook is available for free.

Your UX Assignment's Solution

If you’re an Oracle ADF developer or partner building Oracle Cloud Applications Release 10 solutions, you can now get the Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns for free in eBook format and make it easy for yourself and your users too.

Looking forward to my next UX homework exchange with Debra!

Women in Tech: Where Are They?

Sun, 2015-11-15 12:39
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Watching thousands of techies storm the floors and swarm the 20+ summits at Web Summit 2015 was an extraordinary experience. As I really looked at the people walking around, though, I couldn’t help thinking, “Where are the women?” Of course I saw women, but I saw far fewer women than men.

Web Summit Centre Stage

Web Summit Centre Stage 

Not relying on my own unofficial observations, I noted a V3 article that not only validated my observations with reflections that mimicked mine but went on to share this data point from Capgemini: “only 18 percent of speakers at Web Summit 2015 were women.”

To be fair, though, throughout the Web Summit, significant awareness was placed on the ever troubling lack of women in professional roles in tech. Hearing different speakers and panelists comment on the state of Women In Technology (WIT) got me wondering: Who exactly are WIT? And why wouldn’t more women pitch up “at the best technology conference on the planet” (Forbes)?

Unofficially I asked somewhere around 50 +/- people from both inside and outside of the software industry to tell me who they think WIT are. I found it interesting that the majority of those who answered mentioned engineering, scientific, and developer job titles or gave me the name of a woman they know who holds a role with a similar job title.

These responses got me thinking about the shape of WIT—who’s in, who’s out. Without a doubt, those women who hold roles with technical job titles are in. But what about those women who have dedicated their entire careers to the tech industry but don’t hold job titles that include the word engineer or developer—women, for example, who design (but don’t build) software or those who write about how to extend or customize software?

Shouldn’t women who’ve built careers in technology and who’ve spent years deep-dive learning about specific industries, domains, software, platforms in order to write content that enables users, as well as those who who’ve spent years designing user experiences as well as developing conceptual object and data models, or those who occasionally code—but never held a job title that includes engineer or developer—count, too?

 Partner, thrive or die session

Microsoft’s Peggy Johnson, EVP, Business Development: Partner, thrive or die session

During my three days at the Web Summit, I attended as many sessions as I could in which women were speakers or panelists. I was hoping to learn from them—learn more about the “who counts” aspect of WIT, as well as hear creative proposals or solutions that address the gender imbalance in the tech world. While today’s grassroots efforts, such as Black Girls Code and CoderDojo, are fantastic, we need to proactively create a next generation of tech women, or we will simply continue having this same conversation.

Sinead Murphy’s “commitment to change” gave me hope that the momentum towards such change is increasing: “As part of an initiative we’re [Web Summit] running to even the gender ratio at our events, we’re giving 10,000 complimentary tickets to our events to women in the tech industry across the world – we hope that it will, in some small way, contribute to solving the problem." The Web Summit will invite “10,000 female entrepreneurs as [Web Summit] guests in 2016.” The Women In Tech Summit will be held in Lisbon next year.

An equally remarkable commitment was announced at Oracle OpenWorld 2015. Oracle CEO Safra Catz announced Oracle’s plan to build a new public school,, saying, “I’ve realised it’s absolutely critical that big companies like ours […] to do something because when you look at the statistics, you realise there are simply not enough women in the pipeline in the math and science education areas.” For more about this new high school, read the diginomica article, Oracle OpenWorld 2015 - Safra Catz on the tech industry's female talent pipeline problem.”

Clearly these are excellent examples of forward movement. But we—ALL women who work in tech, as well as our male colleagues—have the opportunity to step up and do more. The challenge of drawing more women into all types of tech roles—no matter the job title—belongs to each and every one of us. What will you do?

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Learn more about Oracle’s WIT in these inspiring stories. And be sure to check out the Oracle Women in Technology Program.

Licht Is Uit? eProseed Shines the Light on IoT and Design Patterns with TopCasuS

Mon, 2015-09-21 03:27

At the Oracle government and innovation event held in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, Oracle partner eProseed demoed a public sector solution that brought together the Internet of Things (IoT) and Activity Based Working (hat tip: Erik Veldhoen [@erikveldhoen]) to enhance business processes for customers: TopCasuS.  Oracle Applications User Experience design patterns and guidance helped eProseed to build a great solution in a productive and consistent way. eProseed NL managing partner, Lonneke Dikmans (@lonnekedikmans) explains more.

Overheid en Innovatie

Tijdens de Oracle Overheid en Innovatie beurs liet eProseed met hun oplossing voor gemeenten en centrale overheid zien hoe je met behulp van Internet of Things (IoT) bedrijfsprocessen kan optimaliseren en verbeteren. TopCasuS is gebaseerd op Gemma 2.0 principes en het concept ‘activity based working’. Dit betekent dat de gebruiker toegang heeft tot de juist informatie op het juiste moment.

TopCasuS UI using Oracle Alta UI

TopCasuS gebruikt Oracle Alta UI 

Op dit moment zijn de volgende modules beschikbaar:

  • Sociaal domein. Enterprise-grade oplossing voor gemeenten die hen ondersteunt bij het uitvoeren van de drie decentralisaties;
  • Openbare ruimte. Module die gemeenten helpt de openbare gemeente schoon, heel en veilig te houden;
  • Shared services. Module voor gemeenten die fuseren of een shared service aan het inrichten zijn.

Licht Is Uit

De openbare ruimte wordt niet alleen schoon, heel en veilig gehouden met behulp van regulier onderhoud, maar ook door te reageren op meldingen. De meldingen kunnen worden gedaan door burgers via een app of the gemeentelijke website, door ambtenaren en ketenpartners en door gebruik te maken van IoT technieken.

Luc and Lonneke demo at the event

Lonneke en Luc op het evenement met Licht Is Uit

Tijdens het evenement demonstreerden ze het volgende scenario:

  1. Een lichtsensor in een fietstunnel meet de hoeveelheid licht in de tunnel. Mensen voelen zich veilig in een verlichte tunnel. 
  2. Als de tunnel donker is, bijvoorbeeld omdat het licht stuk is, wordt een notificatie verzonden naar het meldingen buitenruimte proces. 
  3. De ambtenaar die verantwoordelijk is voor het gebied van de fietstunnel ontvangt een notificatie dat er een nieuwe zaak is gestart en hij pakt deze op, op dezelfde manier als wanneer een burger of college de melding gedaan zou hebben.

English Language Version

The eProseed TopCasuS solution is based on Gemma 2.0 principles and Erik Veldhoen's (@erikveldhoen) concept of Activity Based Working. This means that the user has access to the right information at the right time. Right now, the following modules are available:

  • Social services. Enterprise grade solution for municipalities (Dutch local government) to support the implementation of new laws about youth care, work, and decentralized social support.
  • Public domain. Module to help municipalities to keep public services and the environment safe, clean, and working properly.
  • Shared services. Module to support municipalities when merging and when they need to implement shared services.

Licht Is Uit (Light Is Out) Demo

Keeping public areas safe, clean, and working properly is carried out by regular servicing, but also by the local authority's reaction to the prompt notifications of issues with their services. These notifications can be triggered by a citizen reporting an issue using a mobile app or a website or by a local authority employee or contractor noticing an issue. But now it can also be reported automatically using the IoT. At the Rotterdam event, eProseed NL CTO and managing partner Luc Bors (@lucb_) demoed with Lonneke how sensors detect an issue and let the local authority know about a problem:

  1. A sensor in a bike tunnel measures the amount of light in the tunnel. Pedestrians and cyclists can go safely through the tunnel.
  2. If a light bulb in the tunnel fails, or something else causes the tunnel to become dark, the sensor detects the change in lighting conditions and a notification is automatically sent to the local authority, creating a new case in their service system.
  3. The local authority employee responsible for the tunnel maintenance receives a notification that a new case has been started, can then assess the situation and process it, just as if a citizen had filed the issue. 

Watch out for more solutions that partners can build productively with reusable UX design patterns and Oracle technology and for demos of the solutions at an event near you soon.

Read more about our eProseed UX enablement event in Utrecht, too.  

Oracle Partners ♥ UX Innovation Events

Thu, 2015-09-17 08:35

I have just returned from a great Apps UX Innovation Events Internet of Things (IoT) hackathon held in Oracle Nederland in Utrecht (I was acting in a judicial capacity). This was the first of such events organized in cooperation with an Oracle partner, in this case eProseed

eProseed Managing Partner Lonneke Dikmans

Design patterns maven: eProseed managing partner, SOA, BPM and UX champ, Lonneke Dikmans (@lonnekedikans) at the hackathon. Always ready to fashion a business solution in a smart, reusable way.

You can read more about what went on at the event on other blogs, but from an Oracle partner enablement perspective (my main role), this kind of participation means a partner can:  

  • Learn hands-on about the latest Oracle technology from Oracle experts in person. This event provided opportunities to dive deep into Oracle Mobile Cloud Service, Oracle IoT Cloud, Oracle Mobile Application Framework, Oracle SOA Suite, and more, to explore building awesome contextual and connected solutions across a range of devices and tech.
  • Bring a team together in one place to work on business problems, to exchange ideas, and to build relationships with the "go-to" people in Oracle's technology and user experience teams.  
  • Demonstrate their design and development expertise and show real Oracle technology leadership to potential customers, to the Oracle PartnerNetwork, and to the educational, development, and innovation ecosystem.

That an eProseed team was declared the winners of the hackathon and that eProseed scored high on all three benefits above is just sweet!

eProseed NL team demo parking solution

The eProseed NL team shows off its winning "painless parking" IoT solution.

Many thanks to eProseed for bringing a team from across Europe and for working with Apps UX Innovation Events to make this event such a success for everyone there!

Stay tuned for more events on the Apps UX Innovation Events blog and watch out for news of the FY16 PaaS4SaaS UX enablement for Oracle partners on this blog.

Pictures from the IoT hackathon are on the Usable Apps Instagram account

Every Word Counts: Translating the Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience

Mon, 2015-09-07 06:06
Loic Le Guisquet. Image by Oracle PR.

"Successfully crossing new frontiers in commerce needs people who understand local preferences as well as global drivers. In addition, technology has also been a great enabler of globalization, so the right balance between people and tech is key to success."

- Loïc Le Guisquet, Oracle President for EMEA and APAC

Oracle's worldwide success is due to a winning combination of smart people with local insight and great globalized technology. The Oracle Applications Cloud experience (UX)—that competitive must-have and differentiator—is also a story of global technology and empathy for people everywhere.

UX provides for the cultural dynamics of how people work, the languages they speak, and local conventions and standards on the job. So, how do we deliver global versions of SaaS? Oracle Applications UX Communications and Outreach's Karen Scipi (@karenscipi) explains:

How We Build for Global Users

Oracle Applications Cloud is currently translated into 23 natural languages, besides U.S. English, using a process that ensures translated versions meet the latest user expectations about language, be it terminology, style, or tone.

Oracle HCM Cloud R10 Optimized for Global Working on YouTube

Global Workforce Optimization with Oracle HCM Cloud Release 10: More than 220 countries or jurisdictions supported.

Oracle Applications Cloud is designed for global use and deployment, leveraging Oracle ADF’s built-in internationalization (i18n) and translatability support to make development and translation easy. For example:

  • Translatable text is stored separately (externalized) from the application code for each language version (called a National Language Support [NLS] version).
  • Externalized text is contained in industry-standard XML Localization Interchange File Format (XLIFF)-based resource bundles, enabling not only safe, fast translation but also easy maintenance on a per language basis.
  • Currency, date, time, characters, reading and writing directions, and other local standards and conventions are automatically built in for developers. Oracle ADF uses the industry-standard i18n support of Oracle Java and Unicode.

In addition:

  • Users can enter and display data in their language of choice, independent of the language of the user interface: relying on what we call multilingual support (or MLS) architecture.
  • The software includes global and country-specific localizations that provide functionality for country- and region-specific statutory regulatory requirements, compliance reporting, local data protection rules, business conventions, organizational structure, payroll, and other real-world necessities for doing business with enterprise software.
  • Users can switch the language of their application session through personalization options.
  • NLS versions can be customized and extended in different languages by using Oracle composer tools to align with to align with their business identity and process. Translated versions too rely on the same architecture as the U.S. version for safe customizations and updates.

How We Translate

During development, the U.S. English source text is pseudo-translated using different language characters (such as symbols, Korean and Arabic characters), "padded" to simulate the longer words of other languages, and then tested with international data by product teams. This enables developers to test for translation and internationalization issues (such as any hard-coded strings still in English, or spacing, alignment, and bi-directional rendering issues) before external translation starts.

Hebrew version of Oracle Sales Cloud Release 8

Internationalized from the get-go: Oracle Sales Cloud in Hebrew (Release 8) shows the built-in bi-directional power of Oracle ADF.

For every target language, the Oracle Worldwide Product Translation Group (WPTG) contracts with professional translators in each country to perform the translation work. Importantly, these in-country translators do not perform literal translations of content but use the choice terms, style, and tone that local Oracle WPTG language specialists specify and that our applications users demand in each country or locale.

Mockup of French R10 Oracle Sales Cloud

Mockup of an Oracle Sales Cloud landing page in French. (Image credit: Laurent Adgie, Oracle Senior Sales Consultant)

NLS versions of Oracle Applications Cloud are made available to customers at the same time as the U.S. English version, released as NLS language packs that contain the translated user interface (UI) text, messages, and embedded help for each language. The secret sauce of this ability to make language versions available at the same time is a combination of Oracle technology and smart people too: translation, in fact, begins as soon as the text is created, and not when it's released! 

And, of course, before the NLS versions of Oracle Applications Cloud are released, Oracle language quality and functional testing teams rigorously test them.

The Language of Choice

Imagine an application that will be used in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia. What words should you choose for the UI?

  • The label Last Name or Surname?
  • The label Social Security Number, Social Insurance Number, or National Identification Number?
  • The MM-DD-YYYY, DD-MM-YYYY, or YYYY-MM-DD date format?

The right word choice for a label in one country, region, or protectorate is not necessarily the right word choice in another. Insight and care is needed in that decision. Language is a critical part of UX and, in the Oracle Applications Cloud UX, all the text you see is written by information development professionals, leaving software developers free to concentrate on building the applications productively and consistently using UX design patterns based on Oracle ADF components.

Our focus on language design—choosing accurate words and specialized terms and pairing them with a naturally conversational voice and tone—and providing descriptions and context for translators and customizers alike-also enables easy translation. Translated versions of application user interface pages are ultimately only as accurate, clear, and understandable as their source pages.

In a future blog post we'll explore how PaaS4SaaS partners and developers using the Oracle Applications Cloud Simplified UX Rapid Development Kit can choose words for their simplified UIs that will resonate with the user’s world and optimize the overall experience.

For More Information

For insights into language design and translation considerations for Oracle Applications Cloud and user interfaces in general, see the Oracle Not Lost in Translation blog and Blogos.

Bucharest's Oracle EPC Ambassadors Show 'n' Wow with Oracle Applications Cloud UX

Sat, 2015-08-22 09:14

The Oracle EMEA Presales Center (EPC) team (@OracleEPC), based in Bucharest, Romania has delivered an awesome Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience (UX) day. 

UX Team in Readers' Cafe Bucharest

The team carries the message: Passion and enthusiasm for UX. In style.

The event was for local customers and partners to find out more about the Oracle Applications Cloud UX strategy, to see and hear how we innovate with UX, and to explore the Oracle Applications Cloud in a personal, hands-on way. I was honored to kick off the proceedings, being keen to gauge the local market reaction to the cloud and innovation, and to answer any questions.

 Still part of UX

Look mum, no UI! But there's still a UX! IoT and web services are part of our Cloud UX story.

An eager and curious audience in Bucharest's Metropolis Centre was treated to an immersive UX show about strategy, science, and storytelling: What's UX? What does UX mean for users and the business? Simplicity, Mobility, Extensibility, Glance, Scan, Commit, the Oracle Cloud as platform, wearables, IoT and web services, and PaaS4SaaS, it was all covered.

The Oracle EPC team was the real enablers. Upstairs in the very funky Readers Café, these UX ambassadors brought the Oracle Applications Cloud UX message to life for customers in style, demoing "by walking around", and staffing stations for deeper discussions about the Oracle HCM Cloud, Oracle Sales Cloud, Oracle ERP Cloud, and PaaS4SaaS.

Oracle EPC team styling the Simplicity, Mobility, Extensibility UX message

The new wearables: Simplicity, Mobility, Extensibility.  

The Oracle EPC team let the UX do the talking by putting the Oracle Applications Cloud into the hands of customers, answering any questions as users enthusiastically swiped and tapped on Apple iPads to explore for themselves.

Oracle ERP Cloud demo in Readers Cafe Bucharest

Oracle Applications Cloud UX orchestration: Music to customer and partner ears.

Later, I was given a walking and video tour of the Oracle EPC operation in the fab Oracle building in Bucharest, co-ordinated by Oracle HCM Cloud and UX champ Vlad Babu (@vladbabu). I learned about the central work that EPC do so passionately across EMEA and APAC in providing content, context, and services to enable the Oracle sales effort: bid management, cloud and technology learning, making web solutions, demos and POC creation, video storytelling, rainmaking with insight, building mobile and PaaS4SaaS integration demos, and more.

I was blown away. To echo Oracle CEO Mark Hurd's (@markvhurd) words, "I didn’t know you did that. I didn’t know you had that."

I do now. And so do our customers.

Our Commitment to UX 

Be clear about what this event meant: It's a practical demonstration of Oracle's tremendous investment in user experience with great design, people, and technology and a testament to global success through bringing it all together. It's a clear message about the UX team's commitment to putting boots on the ground in EMEA, and other regions to listen, watch, and enable. That's why I'm here in EMEA.

Listening to the people who matter. And responding. That's UX.

UX is about listening to customers, partners, and users. It's about empathy. It's about being there.

The Bucharest event is just the beginning of great things to come and even greater things to happen for Oracle Applications Cloud customers and partners in EMEA and APAC. I'll be back. See you soon!

Be Prepared 

If you missed the event, check out our free Oracle Applications Cloud UX eBook, and find out how you can participate in the Oracle Cloud UX and future events in your area from the Usable Apps website. Keep up to date by following along on Twitter (@usableapps). 


Thanks to Vlad Babu and Monica Costea for making it all happen, the co-ordination skills of the Oracle Applications UX team in the U.S., to Oracle EPC management for their support, and to Marcel Comendant for the images used on this page and on Twitter.

The Romanian magazine Cariere also has coverage of the event (in Romanian): Şi tu foloseşti Cloud-ul, doar că nu ştii (Google Translate provides a decent gist translation of the article). 

Visitas estudiantiles a Oracle MDC

Thu, 2015-08-06 07:17

Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), User Experience Developer, nos cuenta de la reciente visita del Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Zamora para conocer el Centro de desarrollo de Oracle en México (MDC), como parte de un programa de Oracle MDC para estudiantes de TI.

Sarahi and Karina at the Event in MDC

Sarahi con Karina Nava (Database developer) explican algunas de las áreas donde los estudiantes de TI pueden desarrollar su carrera en Oracle

Cada semestre en Oracle Mexico Development Center (A.K.A. MDC) le damos la bienvenida a cientos de estudiantes del área de Telecomunicaciones e Informática como una oportunidad de conocer el centro de desarrollo y las distintas áreas en las que Oracle es líder en el mercado.

Students learn about the important role of Oracle MDC and IT

Estudiantes aprenden acerca del importante rol de Oracle MDC en el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías y el trabajo que ahí se hace.

Estudiantes de diferentes universidades de todo el país han llegado para conocer más sobre Oracle y cómo estamos revolucionando no sólo nuestro país sino el mundo con las nuevas tecnologías de información. Junto con otros compañeros, yo soy parte del equipo que recibe a estos estudiantes y les damos una charla corta y divertida sobre qué es Oracle, cómo está impactando las tecnologías de manera global, porqué México para un centro de desarrollo, qué hacemos aquí, cómo es nuestro ambiente de trabajo y lo increíble que es trabajar para una empresa de nivel y reconocimiento internacional.

Students gather on the balcony at MDC for a group photograph

Los estudiantes de las distintas universidades toman un pequeño recorrido por las instalaciones de Oracle MDC. Aquí, los estudiantes en uno de los balcones.

Te gusta la idea de visitarnos y eres estudiante o maestro del ramo de Tecnologías de Información? Ponte en contacto con Laura Ramos o para conocer los detalles y programar una visita.

Flying Monkeys! Fun at work with UX. What's on your desk?

Oracle Applications User Experience mezclando la diversión y el trabajo en la nube!

Puedes leer más acerca de Oracle MDC en nuestra página de Facebook y conocer más acerca del equipo Oracle Applications User Experience en el website de Usable Apps.