Skip navigation.

Usable Apps

Syndicate content
Simplified UIs for the Cloud. Build simply with patterns. Click for the R10 Simplified UI UX Design eBook.
Updated: 3 hours 32 min ago

PaaS4SaaS Developers' Code Is Always 'On': OAUX is on OTN and GitHub

Sat, 2016-02-06 09:35

Boom! That's the sound of thunder rolling as PaaS and SaaS developers work as fast as lightning in the cloud. The cloud has changed customer expectations about applicationstoo; if they don’t like their user experience (UX) or they don’t get it fast, they’ll go elsewhere.

PaaS4SaaS developers know their code is always 'on'.

But you can accelerate the development of your PaaS4SaaS solutions with a killer UX easily by now downloading the AppsCloudUIKit software part of the Cloud UX simplified UI Rapid Development Kit (RDK) for Release 10 PaaS4SaaS solutions from the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) or from GitHub.

The Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) team's Oracle Cloud RDK is certified with 11c and 12g and the download includes a developer eBook that explains quickly how to build a complete SaaS or PaaS solution in a matter of hours.

Build a simplified UI with the RDK

The AppsCloudUIKit software part of our partner training kit is on OTN and GitHub and comes with video and eBook guidance.

Build a simplified UI developer eBook

The developer eBook is part of the AppsCloudUIKit dowloads on OTN and GitHub.

For the complete developer experience fast, check out the cool Oracle Usable Apps channel YouTube videos from our own dev and design experts on how to design and build your own simplified UI for SaaS using PaaS.

Enjoy. Do share your thoughts in the comments after you've used the complete RDK.

CrossFit and Coding: 3 Lessons for Women and Technology

Mon, 2016-01-18 17:21

Yes, it’s January again. Time to act on that New Year resolution and get into the gym to burn off those holiday excesses. But have you got what it takes to keep going back?

Here’s Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), our User Experience Developer in Oracle’s México Development Center, to tell us about how her CrossFit experience not only challenges the myths about fierce workouts being something only for the guys but about what that lesson can teach us about coding and women in technology too…

Introducing CrossFit: Me Against Myself

Heard about CrossFit? In case you haven’t, it’s an intense fitness program with a mix of weights, cardio, other exercises, and a lot of social media action too about how much we love doing CrossFit.

CrossFit is also a great way to keep fit and to make new friends. Most workouts are so tough that you’re left all covered in sweat, your muscles are on fire, and you feel like it's going to be impossible to even move the next day.

But you keep doing it anyway. 

One of the things I love most about CrossFit is that it is super dynamic. The Workout of the Day (WOD) is a combination of activities, from running outside, gymnastics, weight training, to swimming. You’re never doing the same thing two days in a row. 

Sounds awesome, right? Well, it is!

But some people, particularly women, unfortunately think CrossFit will make them bulk up and they’ll end up with HUGE muscles! A lot of people on the Internet are saying this, and lots of my friends believe it too: CrossFit is really for men and not women. 

From CrossFit to CrossWIT: Women in Techology (WIT)

Just like with CrossFit, there are many young women who also believe that coding is something meant only for men. Seems crazy, but let's be honest, hiring a woman who knows how to code can be a major challenge (my manager can tell you about that!).

So, why aren't women interested in either coding or lifting weights? Or are they? Is popular opinion the truth, that there are some things that women shouldn't do rather than cannot do?

The reality is that CrossFit won't make you bulk up like a bodybuilder, any more than studying those science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) subjects in school won’t make you any less feminine. Women have been getting the wrong messages about gender and technology from the media and from advertising since we were little girls. We grew up believing that intense workout programs, just like learning computer languages, and about engineering, science and math, are “man’s stuff”. And then we wonder where are the women in technology?!

3 Lessons to Challenge Conventions and Change Yourself

So, wether you are interested in these things, or not, I would like to point out 3 key lessons, based on my experience, that I am sure would help you in some stage of your life: 

  1. Don't be afraid of defying those gender stereotypes. You can become whatever you want to be: a successful doctor, a great programmer, or even a CrossFit professional. Go for it!

  2. Choosing to be or to do something different from what others consider “normal” can be hard, but keep doing it! There are talented women in many fields of work who, despite the stereotypes, are awesome professionals, are respected for what they do, and have become key parts of their organizations and companies. Coding is a world largely dominated by men now, with 70% of the jobs taken by males, but that does not stop us from challenging and changing things so that diversity makes the tech industry a better place for everyone

  3. If you are interested in coding, computer science, or technology in general, keep up with your passion by learning more from others by reading the latest tech blogs, for example. If you don't know where to start, here are some great examples to inspire you: our own VoX, Usable Apps, and AppsLab blogs. Read up about the Oracle Women in Technology (WIT) program too.

I'm sure you'll find something of interest in the work Oracle does and you can use our resources to pursue your interests in a career in technology! And who knows? Maybe you can join us at an Oracle Applications User Experience event in the future. We would love to see you there and meet you in person.

I think you will like what you can become! Just like the gym, don’t wait until next January to start.

Related Links

Selfies. Social. And Style: Smartwatch UX Trends

Sun, 2015-12-27 16:58

From Antiques to Apple

“I don’t own a watch myself”, a great parting shot by Kevin of Timepiece Antique Clocks in the Liberties, Dublin.

I had popped in one rainy day in November to discover more about clock making and to get an old school perspective on smartwatches. Kevin’s comment made sense. “Why would he need to own a watch?” I asked myself, surrounded by so many wonderful clocks from across the ages, all keeping perfect time.

This made me consider what might influence people to use smartwatches? Such devices offer more than just telling the time.

Timepiece Antiques in Dublin

From antiques to Apple: UX research in the Liberties, Dublin

2015 was very much the year of the smartwatch. The arrival of the Apple Watch earlier in 2015 sparked much press excitement and Usable Apps covered the enterprise user experience (UX) angle with two much-read blog pieces featuring our Group Vice President, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley).

Although the Apple Watch retains that initial consumer excitement (at the last count about 7 million units have shipped), we need to bear in mind that the Oracle Applications User Experience cloud strategy is not about one device. The Glance UX framework runs just as well on Pebble and Android Wear devices, for example.

 Exciting Offerings in 2015

It's not all about the face. Two exciting devices came my way in 2015 for evaluation against the cloud user experience: The Basis (left) and Vector Watch. 

Overall, the interest in wearable tech and what it can do for the enterprise is stronger than ever. Here's my (non-Oracle endorsed) take on what's going to be hot and why in 2016 for smartwatch UX.

Trending Beyond Trendy 

There were two devices that came my way in 2015 for evaluation that for me captured happening trends in smartwatch user experience. 

First there was the Basis Peak (now just Basis). I covered elsewhere my travails in setting up the Basis and how my perseverance eventually paid off.

 The Ultimate Fitness and Sleep Tracker

Basis: The ultimate fitness and sleep tracker. Quantified self heaven for those non-fans of Microsoft Excel and notebooks. Looks great too! 

Not only does the Basis look good, but its fitness functionality, range of activity and sleep monitoring "habits," data gathering, and visualizations matched and thrilled my busy work/life balance. Over the year, the Basis added new features that reflected a more personal quantified self angle (urging users to take a "selfie") and then acknowledged that fitness fans might be social creatures (or at least in need of friends) by prompting them to share their achievements, or "bragging rights," to put it the modern way.

Bragging Rights notification on Basis

Your bragging rights are about to peak: Notifications on Basis (middle) 

Second there was the Vector Watch, which came to me by way of a visit to Oracle EPC in Bucharest. I was given a device to evaluate.

A British design, with development and product operations in Bucharest and Palo Alto too, the Vector looks awesome. The sophisticated, stylish appearance of the watch screams class and quality. It is easily worn by the most fashionable people around and yet packs a mighty user experience.  

 Style and function together

Vector Watch: Fit executive meets fashion 

I simply love the sleek, subtle, How To Spend It positioning, the range of customized watch faces, notifications integration, activity monitoring capability, and the analytics of the mobile app that it connects with via Bluetooth. Having to charge the watch battery only 12 times (or fewer) each year means one less strand to deal with in my traveling Kabelsalat

The Vector Watch affordance for notifications is a little quirky, and sure it’s not the Garmin or Suunto that official race pacers or the hardcore fitness types will rely on, and maybe the watch itself could be a little slimmer. But it’s an emerging story, and overall this is the kind of device for me, attracting positive comments from admirers (of the watch, not me) worldwide, from San Francisco to Florence, mostly on its classy looks alone.

I'm so there with the whole #fitexecutive thing.

Perhaps the Vector Watch exposes that qualitative self to match the quantified self needs of our well-being that the Basis delivers on. Regardless, the Vector Watch tells us that wearable tech is coming of age in the fashion sense. Wearable tech has to. These are deeply personal devices, and as such, continue the evolution of wristwatches looking good and functioning well while matching the user's world and responding to what's hot in fashion.

Heck, we are now even seeing the re-emergence of pocket watches as tailoring adapts and facilitates their use. Tech innovation keeps time and keeps up, too, and so we have Kickstarter wearabletech solutions for pocket watches appearing, designed for the Apple Watch.

The Three "Fs"

Form and function is a mix that doesn't always quite gel. Sometimes compromises must be made trying to make great-looking, yet useful, personal technology. Such decisions can shape product adoption. The history of watch making tells us that.

Whereas the “F” of the smartwatch era of 2014–2015 was “Fitness,” it’s now apparent that the “F” that UX pros need to empathize with in 2016 will be "Fashion." Fashionable technology (#fashtech) in the cloud, the device's overall style and emotional pull, will be as powerful a driver of adoption as the mere outer form and the inner functionality of the watch.

The Beauty of Our UX Strategy 

The Oracle Applications Cloud UX strategy—device neutral that it is—is aware of such trends, ahead of them even.

The design and delivery of beautiful things has always been at the heart of Jeremy Ashley’s group. Watching people use those beautiful things in a satisfied way and hearing them talk passionately about them is a story that every enterprise UX designer and developer wants the bragging rights to.

So, what will we see on the runway from Usable Apps in 2016 in this regard?

Stay tuned, fashtechistas!

ORAMEX Tech Day 2015 Guadalajara: Global Cloud UX Goes Local

Sun, 2015-12-20 22:59

You asked. We came. We were already there.

In November, the Oracle México Development Center (MDC) in Guadalajara hosted the ORAMEX Tech Day 2015 event. This great location gave the Grupo de Usuarios Oracle de México (the Oracle User Group in México) (@oramexico) access to the very strong technical community in the region, and attendees from Guadalajara and surrounding cities such as Colima, León, and Morelia heard MDC General Manager Erik Peterson kick off the proceedings with a timely keynote on the important role that MDC (now celebrating its 5th year) plays in delivering Oracle products and services.

Erik Peterson delivers the MDC keynote

Erik Peterson delivers the MDC keynote at the ORAMEX Tech Day.

Naturally, Tech Day was also a perfect opportunity for the Oracle Applications User Experience (UX) team to support our ORAMEX friends with the latest and greatest UX outreach.

UX team at ORAMEX Tech Day 2015

Oracle Applications UX staffers at ORAMEX Tech Day (Left to right): Sarahi Mireles, Tim Dubois, Rafael (Rafa) Belloni, and Noel Portugal (image courtesy of ORAMEX) 

UX team members from the U.S., Senior Manager UX Product and Program Management Tim Dubois (@timdubis) and Senior Manager Emerging Tech Development Noel Portugal (@noelportugal), joined local staffers Senior UX Design Developer Rafa Belloni (@rafabelloni) and UX Developer Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles) to demo the latest UX technical resources for the community, to bring everyone up to speed on the latest UX cloud strategy and messages, and to take the pulse of the local market for our cloud UX and innovation enablement and outreach.

Tim and Sarahi demoed the latest from the Release 10 Simplified UI PaaS4SaaS Rapid Development Kit (RDK) and Rafa and Noel showed off cool Internet of Things proof of concept innovations; all seamlessly part of the same Oracle UX cloud strategy.

Sarahi Mireles introduces the RDK

Sarahi leading and winning with the RDK 

Tim and Sarahi provided a dual-language (in English and Spanish), real-time, exploration of what the RDK is, why you need it, what it contains, and how you get started.

Tim Dubois deep dives into the RDK for ORAMEX audience

The long view: Tim explains that the RDK is part of an overall enablement strategy for the Oracle Cloud UX: Simple to use, simple to build, simple to sell solutions. 

You can get started by grabbing technology-neutral Simplified UI UX Design Patterns for Release 10 eBook. It's free. And, watch out for updates to the RDK on the "Build a Simplified UI" page on the Usable Apps website. Bookmark it now! 

Simplified UI UX Design Patterns eBook

Your FREE Simplified UI UX Design Patterns eBook for PaaS and SaaS is now available

ORAMEX Tech Day 2015 was a great success, representing an opportunity for OAUX to collaborate with, and enable, a local technical community and Oracle User Group, to demonstrate, in practical ways, our commitment to bringing that must-have cloud UX message and resources to partners and customers worldwide, and of course, to show examples of the awesome role the MDC UX team plays within Oracle.

 UX Team Ready to Fly

Where will we go next? I wonder…

What's next? Stay tuned to the Usable Apps website for event details and how you can participate in our outreach and follow us on Twitter at @usableapps for up-to-the-minute happenings!

Special thanks goes to Plinio Arbizu (@parbizu) and Rolando Carrasco (@borland_c) and to the rest of the ORAMEX team for inviting us and for organizing such a great event.

UX Empathy and the Art of Storytelling

Wed, 2015-11-25 13:14

At this year’s Web Summit in Dublin, Ireland, I had the opportunity to observe thousands of attendees. They came from 135 different countries and represented different generations.

Despite these enormous differences, they came together and communicated.

But how? With all of the hype about how different communication styles are among the Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, Millennials, and Generation Zers, I expected to see lots of small groupings of attendees based on generation. And I thought that session audiences would mimic this, too. But I could not have been more wrong.

How exactly, then, did speakers, panelists, and interviewers keep the attention of attendees in the 50+ crowd, the 40+ crowd, and the 20+ crowd while they sat in the same room?

The answer is far simpler than I could have imagined: Authenticity. They kept their messages simple, specific, honest, and in context of the audience and the medium in which they were delivering them.

 Estee Lalonde in conversation at the Fashion Summit session "Height, shoe size and Instagram followers please?"

Web Summit: Estée Lalonde (@EsteeLalonde) in conversation at the Fashion Summit session "Height, shoe size and Instagram followers please?"

Simplicity in messaging was key across Web Summit sessions: Each session was limited to 20 minutes, no matter whether the stage was occupied by one speaker or a panel of interviewees. For this to be successful, those onstage needed to understand their brands as well as the audience and what they were there to hear.

Attention spans are shortening, so it’s increasingly critical to deliver an honest, authentic, personally engaging story. Runar Reistrup, Depop, said it well at the Web Summit when he said:

 Runar Reistrup in conversation during the Fashion Summit session "A branding lesson from the fashion industry"

Web Summit: Runar Reistrup (@runarreistrup) in conversation during the Fashion Summit session "A branding lesson from the fashion industry"

While lots of research, thought, and hard work goes into designing and building products, today’s brand awareness is built with social media. Users need to understand the story you’re telling but not be overwhelmed by contrived messaging.

People want to connect with stories and learn key messages through those stories. Storytelling is the important challenge of our age. And how we use each social medium to tell a story is equally important. Storytelling across mediums is not a one-size-fits-all experience; each medium deserves a unique messaging style. As Mark Little (@marklittlenews), founder of Storyful, makes a point of saying, "This is the golden age of storytelling.

The Oracle Applications User Experience team recognizes this significance of storytelling and the importance of communicating the personality of our brand. We take time to nurture connections and relationships with those who use our applications, which enables us to empathize with our users in authentic ways.

 Aine Kerr talking about the art of storytelling

Web Summit: Áine Kerr (@AineKerr) talking about the art of storytelling

The Oracle simplified user interface is designed with consideration of our brand and the real people—like you—who use our applications. We want you to be as comfortable using our applications as you are having a conversation in your living room. We build intuitive applications that that are based on real-world stories—yours—and that solve real-world challenges that help make your work easier.

We experiment quite a bit, and we purposefully “think as if there is no box.” (Maria Hatzistefanis, Rodial)

 Maria Hatzistefanis in conversation during the Fashion Summit session "Communication with your customer in the digital age"

Web Summit: Maria Hatzistefanis (@MrsRodial) in conversation during the Fashion Summit session "Communication with your customer in the digital age"

We strive for finding that authentic connection between the simplified user interface design and the user.  We use context and content (words) to help shape and inform what message we promote on each user interface page. We choose the words we use as well as the tone carefully because we recognize the significance of messaging, whether the message is a two-word field label or a tweet.  And we test, modify, and retest our designs with real users before we build applications to ensure that the designs respond to you and your needs.

If you want to take advantage of our design approach and practices, download our simplified user experience design patterns eBook for free and design a user experience that mimics the one we deliver in the simplified user interface. And if you do, please let us know what you think at @usableapps.

3 Lessons from the Darkness for Cloud Developers: Design Patterns

Sun, 2015-11-22 08:39
Simplified UI UX Design Patterns eBook

A visit to a very unusual restaurant in Berlin reveals how following familiar and established user experience (UX) design patterns makes things easy for developers and users of cloud applications alike.

Meat-eaters may like to dive right in and consume the free Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns first. 

That UX Homework Assignment

Just returned from Berlin. While I was there I completed a reverse UX homework assignment given to me by Oracle partner Certus Solutions Cloud Services VP Debra Lilley (@debralilley): to visit a restaurant called Dunkel.

Dunkel Unsicht-Bar and Restaurant is where you are seated, served, and eat in total darkness (Dunkel means dark in German).

To begin with, you order from a set menu, in the light. Then, your assigned server appears, asks you to put your hands on their shoulders, and to follow you downstairs into the darkness of the restaurant itself.

I entered a world that was pitch black. Really. No smartphone UIs glowing, no luminous wristwatch dials twinkled, not even the blink of an optical heart rate monitor sensor on a smartwatch could be glanced anywhere

The server seats you, gives you a quick verbal orientation as to what is, and will be in front, of you.

All around me was the sound of other diners enjoying themselves.

Yet, I enjoyed one of the best vegetarian meals I’ve had in years.

title=

Instagram pic of the awesome meal I had in Dunkel.

I had no problems whatsoever in finding or using the cutlery, the breadbasket, or eating any of the food served (four courses) in the total darkness. I ate as normal, at my usual pace, and when the meal was complete, I emerged into the light, again guided by the server, and without looking like I had been in a food fight. 

An amazing, one of a kind, experience! I even left a tip! Try it yourself if you visit Berlin.

Lessons from the Darkness

So, what are the UX lessons from Dunkel? Why was it that I could so easily eat there, without ending up in a complete mess, screaming for help?

  1. Firstly, keep it simple. I didn’t have to deal with, for example, a complex floral arrangement or other decoration shoved into the middle of the table. Everything in front of me was functional or consumable.
  2. Secondly, the experience must be what consumers  expect and be about things they are familiar with from everyday use. The layout of the cutlery (and yes, there was more than one spoon and no, I never used my hands), the positioning of the plates, even where my drink was placed, was familiar to me and as expected. They followed a pattern. No nasty surprises!
  3. Thirdly, if you do need to provide guidance, keep it short and about completing the task at hand, but encourage discovery. For example, my dessert was made of three parts (of crème of pomegranate, mango chili sauce, and homemade pralines) and served in one of those little swing-top glass bottles you need to flip open. But, again, no issue in consuming the lot.

Keeping things simple, familiar,  providing concise task guidance and playing on a sense of discovery is an experiential approach also evident in the simplified UIs in Oracle’s Cloud Applications. The UX follows design patterns.

Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns

The Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns for Release 10 eBook is available for free.

Your UX Assignment's Solution

If you’re an Oracle ADF developer or partner building Oracle Cloud Applications Release 10 solutions, you can now get the Oracle Cloud Applications simplified UI UX design patterns for free in eBook format and make it easy for yourself and your users too.

Looking forward to my next UX homework exchange with Debra!

Women in Tech: Where Are They?

Sun, 2015-11-15 12:39
0 0 1 710 4047 Oracle America, Inc. 33 9 4748 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Watching thousands of techies storm the floors and swarm the 20+ summits at Web Summit 2015 was an extraordinary experience. As I really looked at the people walking around, though, I couldn’t help thinking, “Where are the women?” Of course I saw women, but I saw far fewer women than men.

Web Summit Centre Stage

Web Summit Centre Stage

Not relying on my own unofficial observations, I noted a V3 article that not only validated my observations with reflections that mimicked mine but went on to share this data point from Capgemini: “only 18 percent of speakers at Web Summit 2015 were women.”

To be fair, though, throughout the Web Summit, significant awareness was placed on the ever troubling lack of women in professional roles in tech. Hearing different speakers and panelists comment on the state of Women In Technology (WIT) got me wondering: Who exactly are WIT? And why wouldn’t more women pitch up “at the best technology conference on the planet” (Forbes)?

Unofficially I asked somewhere around 50 +/- people from both inside and outside of the software industry to tell me who they think WIT are. I found it interesting that the majority of those who answered mentioned engineering, scientific, and developer job titles or gave me the name of a woman they know who holds a role with a similar job title.

These responses got me thinking about the shape of WIT—who’s in, who’s out. Without a doubt, those women who hold roles with technical job titles are in. But what about those women who have dedicated their entire careers to the tech industry but don’t hold job titles that include the word engineer or developer—women, for example, who design (but don’t build) software or those who write about how to extend or customize software?

Shouldn’t women who’ve built careers in technology and who’ve spent years deep-dive learning about specific industries, domains, software, platforms in order to write content that enables users, as well as those who who’ve spent years designing user experiences as well as developing conceptual object and data models, or those who occasionally code—but never held a job title that includes engineer or developer—count, too?

 Partner, thrive or die session

Microsoft’s Peggy Johnson, EVP, Business Development: Partner, thrive or die session

During my three days at the Web Summit, I attended as many sessions as I could in which women were speakers or panelists. I was hoping to learn from them—learn more about the “who counts” aspect of WIT, as well as hear creative proposals or solutions that address the gender imbalance in the tech world. While today’s grassroots efforts, such as Black Girls Code and CoderDojo, are fantastic, we need to proactively create a next generation of tech women, or we will simply continue having this same conversation.

Sinead Murphy’s “commitment to change” gave me hope that the momentum towards such change is increasing: “As part of an initiative we’re [Web Summit] running to even the gender ratio at our events, we’re giving 10,000 complimentary tickets to our events to women in the tech industry across the world – we hope that it will, in some small way, contribute to solving the problem." The Web Summit will invite “10,000 female entrepreneurs as [Web Summit] guests in 2016.” The Women In Tech Summit will be held in Lisbon next year.

An equally remarkable commitment was announced at Oracle OpenWorld 2015. Oracle CEO Safra Catz announced Oracle’s plan to build a new public school, d.tech, saying, “I’ve realised it’s absolutely critical that big companies like ours […] to do something because when you look at the statistics, you realise there are simply not enough women in the pipeline in the math and science education areas.” For more about this new high school, read the diginomica article, Oracle OpenWorld 2015 - Safra Catz on the tech industry's female talent pipeline problem.”

Clearly these are excellent examples of forward movement. But we—ALL women who work in tech, as well as our male colleagues—have the opportunity to step up and do more. The challenge of drawing more women into all types of tech roles—no matter the job title—belongs to each and every one of us. What will you do?

0 0 1 45 260 Oracle America, Inc. 2 1 304 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Learn more about Oracle’s WIT in these inspiring stories. And be sure to check out the Oracle Women in Technology Program.