Skip navigation.

Wim Coekaerts

Syndicate content
Updated: 8 hours 9 min ago

MySQL 5.6.20-4 and Oracle Linux DTrace

Thu, 2014-07-31 09:57
The MySQL team just released MySQL 5.6.20. One of the cool new things for Oracle Linux users is the addition of MySQL DTrace probes. When you use Oracle Linux 6, or 7 with UEKr3 (3.8.x) and the latest DTrace utils/tools, then you can make use of this. MySQL 5.6 is available for install through ULN or from public-yum. You can just install it using yum.

# yum install mysql-community-server

Then install dtrace utils from ULN.

# yum install dtrace-utils

As root, enable DTrace and allow normal users to record trace information:

# modprobe fasttrap
# chmod 666 /dev/dtrace/helper

Start MySQL server.

# /etc/init.d/mysqld start

Now you can try out various dtrace scripts. You can find the reference manual for MySQL DTrace support here.

Example1

Save the script below as query.d.

#!/usr/sbin/dtrace -qws
#pragma D option strsize=1024


mysql*:::query-start /* using the mysql provider */
{

  self->query = copyinstr(arg0); /* Get the query */
  self->connid = arg1; /*  Get the connection ID */
  self->db = copyinstr(arg2); /* Get the DB name */
  self->who   = strjoin(copyinstr(arg3),strjoin("@",
     copyinstr(arg4))); /* Get the username */

  printf("%Y\t %20s\t  Connection ID: %d \t Database: %s \t Query: %s\n", 
     walltimestamp, self->who ,self->connid, self->db, self->query);

}

Run it, in another terminal, connect to MySQL server and run a few queries.

# dtrace -s query.d 
dtrace: script 'query.d' matched 22 probes
CPU     ID                    FUNCTION:NAME
  0   4133 _Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj:query-start 2014 
    Jul 29 12:32:21 root@localhost	  Connection ID: 5 	 Database:  	 
    Query: select @@version_comment limit 1

  0   4133 _Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj:query-start 2014 
    Jul 29 12:32:28 root@localhost	  Connection ID: 5 	 Database:  	 
    Query: SELECT DATABASE()

  0   4133 _Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj:query-start 2014 
    Jul 29 12:32:28 root@localhost	  Connection ID: 5 	 Database: database 	 
    Query: show databases

  0   4133 _Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj:query-start 2014 
    Jul 29 12:32:28 root@localhost	  Connection ID: 5 	 Database: database 	 
    Query: show tables

  0   4133 _Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj:query-start 2014 
    Jul 29 12:32:31 root@localhost	  Connection ID: 5 	 Database: database 	 
    Query: select * from foo

Example 2

Save the script below as statement.d.

#!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s

#pragma D option quiet

dtrace:::BEGIN
{
   printf("%-60s %-8s %-8s %-8s\n", "Query", "RowsU", "RowsM", "Dur (ms)");
}

mysql*:::update-start, mysql*:::insert-start,
mysql*:::delete-start, mysql*:::multi-delete-start,
mysql*:::multi-delete-done, mysql*:::select-start,
mysql*:::insert-select-start, mysql*:::multi-update-start
{
    self->query = copyinstr(arg0);
    self->querystart = timestamp;
}

mysql*:::insert-done, mysql*:::select-done,
mysql*:::delete-done, mysql*:::multi-delete-done, mysql*:::insert-select-done
/ self->querystart /
{
    this->elapsed = ((timestamp - self->querystart)/1000000);
    printf("%-60s %-8d %-8d %d\n",
           self->query,
           0,
           arg1,
           this->elapsed);
    self->querystart = 0;
}

mysql*:::update-done, mysql*:::multi-update-done
/ self->querystart /
{
    this->elapsed = ((timestamp - self->querystart)/1000000);
    printf("%-60s %-8d %-8d %d\n",
           self->query,
           arg1,
           arg2,
           this->elapsed);
    self->querystart = 0;
}

Run it and do a few queries.

# dtrace -s statement.d 
Query                                                        RowsU    RowsM    Dur (ms)
select @@version_comment limit 1                             0        1        0
SELECT DATABASE()                                            0        1        0
show databases                                               0        6        0
show tables                                                  0        2        0
select * from foo                                            0        1        0