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Catherine Devlin

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Databases taste better with Python.
Updated: 2 hours 41 min ago

rdbms-subsetter

Fri, 2014-11-14 10:06

I've never had a tool I really liked that would extract a chunk of a large production database for testing purposes while respecting the database's foreign keys. This past week I finally got to write one: rdbms-subsetter.

rdbms-subsetter postgresql://user:passwd@host/source_db postgresql://user:passwd@host/excerpted_db 0.001

Getting it to respect referential integrity "upward" - guaranteeing every needed parent record would be included for each child row - took less than a day. Trying to get it to also guarantee referential integrity "downward" - including all child records for each parent record - was a Quixotic idea that had me tilting at windmills for days. It's important, because parent records without child records are often useless or illogical. Yet trying to pull them all in led to an endlessly propagating process - percolation, in chemical engineering terms - that threatened to make every test database a complete (but extremely slow) clone of production. After all, if every row in parent table P1 demands rows in child tables C1, C2, and C3, and those child rows demand new rows in parent tables P2 and P3, which demand more rows in C1, C2, and C3, which demand more rows in their parent tables... I felt like I was trying to cut a little sweater out of a big sweater without snipping any yarns.

So I can't guarantee child records - instead, the final process prioritizes creating records that will fill out the empty child slots in existing parent records. But there will almost inevitably be some child slots left open when the program is done.

I've been using it against one multi-GB, highly interconnected production data warehouse, so it's had some testing, but your bug reports are welcome.

Like virtually everything else I do, this project depends utterly on SQLAlchemy.

I developed this for use at 18F, and my choice of a workplace where everything defaults to open was wonderfully validated when I asked about the procedure for releasing my 18F work to PyPI. The procedure is - and I quote -

Just go for it.

%sql: To Pandas and Back

Tue, 2014-08-26 05:03

A Pandas DataFrame has a nice to_sql(table_name, sqlalchemy_engine) method that saves itself to a database.

The only trouble is that coming up with the SQLAlchemy Engine object is a little bit of a pain, and if you're using the IPython %sql magic, your %sql session already has an SQLAlchemy engine anyway. So I created a bogus PERSIST pseudo-SQL command that simply calls to_sql with the open database connection:

%sql PERSIST mydataframe

The result is that your data can make a very convenient round-trip from your database, to Pandas and whatever transformations you want to apply there, and back to your database:



In [1]: %load_ext sql

In [2]: %sql postgresql://@localhost/
Out[2]: u'Connected: @'

In [3]: ohio = %sql select * from cities_of_ohio;
246 rows affected.

In [4]: df = ohio.DataFrame()

In [5]: montgomery = df[df['county']=='Montgomery County']

In [6]: %sql PERSIST montgomery
Out[6]: u'Persisted montgomery'

In [7]: %sql SELECT * FROM montgomery
11 rows affected.
Out[7]:
[(27L, u'Brookville', u'5,884', u'Montgomery County'),
(54L, u'Dayton', u'141,527', u'Montgomery County'),
(66L, u'Englewood', u'13,465', u'Montgomery County'),
(81L, u'Germantown', u'6,215', u'Montgomery County'),
(130L, u'Miamisburg', u'20,181', u'Montgomery County'),
(136L, u'Moraine', u'6,307', u'Montgomery County'),
(157L, u'Oakwood', u'9,202', u'Montgomery County'),
(180L, u'Riverside', u'25,201', u'Montgomery County'),
(210L, u'Trotwood', u'24,431', u'Montgomery County'),
(220L, u'Vandalia', u'15,246', u'Montgomery County'),
(230L, u'West Carrollton', u'13,143', u'Montgomery County')]

auto-generate SQLAlchemy models

Mon, 2014-07-28 15:30

PyOhio gave my lightning talk on ddlgenerator a warm reception, and Brandon Lorenz got me thinking, and PyOhio sprints filled my with py-drenaline, and now ddlgenerator can inspect your data and spit out SQLAlchemy model definitions for you:


$ cat merovingians.yaml
-
name: Clovis I
reign:
from: 486
to: 511
-
name: Childebert I
reign:
from: 511
to: 558
$ ddlgenerator --inserts sqlalchemy merovingians.yaml

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, Column, Integer, Table, Unicode
engine = create_engine(r'sqlite:///:memory:')
metadata = MetaData(bind=engine)

merovingians = Table('merovingians', metadata,
Column('name', Unicode(length=12), nullable=False),
Column('reign_from', Integer(), nullable=False),
Column('reign_to', Integer(), nullable=False),
schema=None)

metadata.create_all()
conn = engine.connect()
inserter = merovingians.insert()
conn.execute(inserter, **{'name': 'Clovis I', 'reign_from': 486, 'reign_to': 511})
conn.execute(inserter, **{'name': 'Childebert I', 'reign_from': 511, 'reign_to': 558})
conn.connection.commit()

Brandon's working on a pull request to provide similar functionality for Django models!