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Re: Constraints and Functional Dependencies

From: Cimode <cimode_at_hotmail.com>
Date: 1 Mar 2007 11:01:55 -0800
Message-ID: <1172775715.722460.35730@31g2000cwt.googlegroups.com>


On 1 mar, 19:34, "V.J. Kumar" <vjkm..._at_gmail.com> wrote:
> "Marshall" <marshall.spi..._at_gmail.com> wrote innews:1172771092.030127.98710_at_k78g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
>
>
>
> > On Mar 1, 6:58 am, "Walt" <wami..._at_verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >> I believe you are correct, but I think the syndrome goes far deeper
> >> than you have said. Basically, the US educational system has evolved
> >> a mthodology in which theory is quite simply not taught at all. What
> >> passes for "theoretical discussion" in an American classroom is
> >> really and extended introduction to the subject matter. The subject
> >> matter itself is embodied in a series of examples, that illustrate
> >> the real meat of what is being taught.
>
> > OT Free associating:
>
> > Conversations with Vadim and others from his part of the world
> > have convinced me that the point at which the average Russian
> > student achieves US-graduate-student level mathematical
> > education is approximately the third grade.
>
> This claim is pure and unmitigated bullshit, an experimental result I've
> arrived at after having associated with many Russians that purportedly
> had superior math education. I must admit I'd used to be as misguided as
> you are in this respect, having been fed popular myths about superiority
> of Russian math education. I'd say idiots are more or less uniformly
> distributed amongst various ethnicities, and their native educational
> systems pecularities are almost irrelevant. Granted, there may be
> cultural influences coming from parents and peers, but that's a
> different matter altogether.

Marshall speaks specifically about academic environments not in general public...

> The American school gives quite enough to those willing to take (not in
> every community unfortunately, but the list of the best public schools
> is freely available to anyone interested).
>
> If one finds math boring, maybe he/she can find something which is more
> appealing to him/her. Why torture yourself if you find the subject
> abhorrent ? For people who really like math, it's like a game of chess;
> if you do not like chess, why bother ?
You are speaking in general. Marshall speaks about specifics. Received on Thu Mar 01 2007 - 13:01:55 CST

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