Home » Other » General » Difference between RDBMS & DBMS
Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103534] Wed, 07 January 2004 08:05 Go to next message
Jacob Abraham
Messages: 1
Registered: January 2004
Junior Member
Can anybody tell me the difference between RDBMS and DBMS.. :-(
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103535 is a reply to message #103534] Thu, 08 January 2004 02:58 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Frank Naude
Messages: 4569
Registered: April 1998
Senior Member
Hi,

A DBMS (DataBase Management System) is used to store data. Nevertheless, one gets different types of databases that stores and manages data differently. For example, a Relational DBMS (or RDBMS) stores data as relations (rows and columns). Likewise, a hierarchical database will store data in complex structures linked with pointers. An object database will store data as objects.

Oracle is an Object Relational Database, which means it stores data in tables with rows and columns. In addition to this Oracle can also store data as XML or Objects.

Best regards.

Frank
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103542 is a reply to message #103534] Sun, 11 January 2004 03:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Saurabh Jain
Messages: 2
Registered: January 2004
Junior Member
hello,
the basic and important difference b/w rdbms and dbms is that in rdbms we can link or relate or can have relation b/w two or more tables and in dbms we can not relate two tables.

rdbms follows E.F. codd rules but dbms not.

thanks
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103622 is a reply to message #103534] Mon, 02 February 2004 02:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
ashish
Messages: 107
Registered: December 2000
Senior Member
1. DBMS - Database Management Systems
Companies need to process a large amount of data. Manual storage of this data wastes a lot of time while retrieving it. It also requires tedious clerical hours to arrange the data in the form required by top management. Storing this data in a way to facilitate easy access is very important and that is why computers are used in organizations. This is possible using DBMS. DBMS, besides allowing you to store large amounts of data, allows you to retrieve information easily whenever and in whichever format it is desired.
2. RDBMS - Relational Database Management Systems
The functionality of RDBMS is the same as DBMS except that the features offered for data storage and retrieval are very advanced. These systems are based on mathematical SET theory. A RDBMS ensures that the data stored in the database is accurate and relevant. Excellent security features are offered by these systems. RDBMS packages are used in medium to large-scale organizations, especially, those where data has to be made available on distributed networks.
These systems have capability to store a very large amount of data and have quick data retrieval mechanisms. They also have elaborate database administration for handling multi-users, storage, and failures.
An RDBMS uses SQL (Structures Query Language) to access data from database. This is a standard language commonly used across different RDBMS.
3. What is the difference between RDBMS & DBMS?
DBMS are for smaller organizations with small amount of data, where security of the data is not of major concern. Also DBMS are not necessarily client server based systems. With DBMS, one can develop a complete application, starting from processing inputs to generating output.
RDBMS are designed to take care of large amounts of data and also the security of this data. They are also client server based systems. To create a complete application, one requires client software like VB, Developer 2000.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103810 is a reply to message #103534] Wed, 24 March 2004 04:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Harjeet Singh Makkar
Messages: 1
Registered: March 2004
Junior Member
DBMS are for smaller organizations with small amount of data, where security of the data is not of major concern. Also DBMS are not necessarily client server based systems. With DBMS, one can develop a complete application, starting from processing inputs to generating output.

RDBMS are designed to take care of large amounts of data and also the security of this data. They are also client server based systems. To create a complete application, one requires client software like VB, Developer 2000.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103845 is a reply to message #103535] Tue, 06 April 2004 19:10 Go to previous messageGo to next message
santosh
Messages: 85
Registered: October 2000
Member
hi,
the difference between dbms and rdms is well defined in terms of the way both organize data and provide retrieval of data .......
dbms does not impose any constraints or security with regard to data manipulation it is user or the programmer responsibility to ensure the ACID PROPERTY of the database whereas the rdbms is more with this regard bcz rdbms difine the integrity constraint for the purpose of holding ACID PROPERTY.
ans [message #103931 is a reply to message #103534] Tue, 25 May 2004 23:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Rahul
Messages: 94
Registered: December 1998
Member
dbms:- permit only one person to access the database at a given time.
rdbms:-allow many user simultaneous access to the database
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103964 is a reply to message #103542] Thu, 03 June 2004 20:12 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Vaibhav
Messages: 13
Registered: April 2001
Junior Member
Hey guys
Could you tell me plz what's 7 difference between RDBS and DBMS and one more is Is the access DBMS?

If it's DBMS then why because in access also we can define relationships ????/???///
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103967 is a reply to message #103845] Mon, 07 June 2004 01:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
aaa
Messages: 2
Registered: September 2000
Junior Member
the difference is """ R """
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #103976 is a reply to message #103542] Thu, 10 June 2004 23:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mahesh Panchal
Messages: 1
Registered: June 2004
Junior Member
DBMS means all information is stored in any way without any order or any key.For example time-table of a class. This is just a database not a relational database. Another thing is that while searching any information in just database a record pointer is maintained.
In case of RDBMS all data must be stored in a table with one or mare keys.Another name of table is a relation . Relation is just a mathematical term of a table. It means that we can perform any operation like Projection, Join, Retrival on that relation and the resulting data is also in term of relation. so we can sau that any relation is closed with respect to all that operators.Searchnig any data in relation is performed through key , record pointer is not maintained.
Query.? [message #104028 is a reply to message #103535] Mon, 05 July 2004 03:39 Go to previous messageGo to next message
G Sirish Reddy
Messages: 1
Registered: July 2004
Junior Member
could you plz explain me what is coadd rules?
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104064 is a reply to message #103542] Fri, 16 July 2004 18:02 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Shiwali
Messages: 1
Registered: July 2004
Junior Member
Hi Rahul,
this is what i could find about the diff bet DBMS and RDBMS.

DBMS/RDBMS

1. DBMS - Database Management Systems
Companies need to process a large amount of data. Manual storage of this data wastes a lot of time while retrieving it. It also requires tedious clerical hours to arrange the data in the form required by top management. Storing this data in a way to facilitate easy access is very important and that is why computers are used in organizations. This is possible using DBMS. DBMS, besides allowing you to store large amounts of data, allows you to retrieve information easily whenever and in whichever format it is desired.

2. RDBMS - Relational Database Management Systems
The functionality of RDBMS is the same as DBMS except that the features offered for data storage and retrieval are very advanced. These systems are based on mathematical SET theory. A RDBMS ensures that the data stored in the database is accurate and relevant. Excellent security features are offered by these systems. RDBMS packages are used in medium to large-scale organizations, especially, those where data has to be made available on distributed networks.

These systems have capability to store a very large amount of data and have quick data retrieval mechanisms. They also have elaborate database administration for handling multi-users, storage, and failures.

An RDBMS uses SQL (Structures Query Language) to access data from database. This is a standard language commonly used across different RDBMS.

3. What is the difference between RDBMS & DBMS?
DBMS are for smaller organizations with small amount of data, where security of the data is not of major concern. Also DBMS are not necessarily client server based systems. With DBMS, one can develop a complete application, starting from processing inputs to generating output.

RDBMS are designed to take care of large amounts of data and also the security of this data. They are also client server based systems. To create a complete application, one requires client software like VB, Developer 2000.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104065 is a reply to message #103535] Sat, 17 July 2004 04:58 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anu
Messages: 82
Registered: May 2000
Member
What is the difference between tables and relations?
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104141 is a reply to message #103542] Wed, 04 August 2004 00:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
srinivasg
Messages: 2
Registered: August 2004
Junior Member
what is diff between dbms and rdbms?
if I am giving one table, how could u find out this is dbms table or rdbms table?
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104161 is a reply to message #104141] Sun, 08 August 2004 18:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kanagaraju.n
Messages: 1
Registered: August 2004
Junior Member
i want exact difference between dbms and rdbms
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104162 is a reply to message #103534] Sun, 08 August 2004 19:14 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Tarun Kumar Sharma
Messages: 1
Registered: August 2004
Junior Member
DBMS can store data in any format but RDBMS store data always in the format of relations or table or we can say in the format of rows and column.

DBMS can store in form of trees,graphs and also in tables.But RDBMS is not in the form of trees and graphs.

Actually RDBMS is the special part of DBMS.
which means Relational DBMS(RDBMS).We can show relations between the tables in the RDBMS.
eg: MS Access,Oracle 8i etc are RDBMS.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS,with 12 card rules [message #104218 is a reply to message #103534] Mon, 23 August 2004 04:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Bhavani
Messages: 5
Registered: December 2001
Junior Member
Card rules of Diff between Dbms And Rdbms
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104233 is a reply to message #104141] Thu, 26 August 2004 03:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ajay Kumar Srivastava
Messages: 1
Registered: August 2004
Junior Member
Please send me the answer of Difference between RDBMS & DBMS
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS,with 12 card rules [message #104246 is a reply to message #104218] Wed, 01 September 2004 22:39 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Baijo Thomas
Messages: 1
Registered: September 2004
Junior Member
1. The Information rule: All information in an RDBMS is represented logically in just one way - by values in tables.
2. The Guaranteed Access rule: Each item of data in an RDBMS is guaranteed to be logically accessible by resorting to a combination of table name, primary key value, and column name.
3. The Systematic Treatment of Null Values rule: Null values (distinct from an empty character string or a string of blank characters and distinct from zero or any other number) are supported in a fully relational DBMS for representing missing information and inapplicable information in a systematic way, independent of the data type.
4. The Dynamic Online Catalog Based on the Relational Model rule: The database description is represented at the logical level in the same way as ordinary data, so that authorized users can apply the same relational language to its interrogation as they apply to the regular data.
5. The Comprehensive Data Sublanguage rule: A relational system may support several languages and various modes of terminal use (for example, the fill-in-blanks mode). However, there must be at least one language whose statements are expressible, per some well-defined syntax, as character strings and whose ability to support all of the following is comprehensible: data definition, view definition, data manipulation (interactive and by program), integrity constraints, and transaction boundaries (begin, commit, and rollback).
6. The View Updating rule: All views of the data which are theoretically updatable must be updatable in practice by the DBMS.
7. The High-level Insert, Update, and Delete rule: The capability of handling a base relation or a derived relation as a single operand applies not only to the retrieval of data but also to the insertion, update, and deletion of data.
8. The Physical Data Independence rule: Application programs and terminal activities remain logically unimpaired whenever any changes are made in either storage representations or access methods.
9. The Logical Data Independence rule: Application programs and terminal activities remain logically unimpaired when information preserving changes of any kind that theoretically permit unimpairment are made to the base tables.
10. The Integrity Independence rule: Integrity constraints must be definable in the RDBMS sub-language and stored in the system catalogue and not within individual application programs.
11. The Distribution Independence rule: An RDBMS has distribution independence. Distribution independence implies that users should not have to be aware of whether a database is distributed.
12. The Nonsubversion rule: If the database has any means of handling a single record at a time, that low-level language must not be able to subvert or avoid the integrity rules which are expressed in a higher-level language that handles multiple records at a time.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104311 is a reply to message #104233] Tue, 14 September 2004 21:58 Go to previous messageGo to next message
amit gupta
Messages: 1
Registered: September 2004
Junior Member
DBMS stand for Database Management System. which consist n number of tables there is no relationship between another table.

RDMBS stand for Relational DataBase Management System. which having the relationship with other tables.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104320 is a reply to message #103534] Fri, 17 September 2004 01:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Neeraj Kumar
Messages: 9
Registered: November 2002
Junior Member
how we establish ralation among table in rdbms.
and how normalisation help in establishing relation.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104330 is a reply to message #103534] Fri, 24 September 2004 01:35 Go to previous messageGo to next message
VENKATESAN
Messages: 2
Registered: February 2002
Junior Member
DBMS stand for Database Management System. which consist n number of tables there is no relationship between another table.

RDMBS stand for Relational DataBase Management System. which having the relationship with other tables.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS,with 12 card rules [message #104344 is a reply to message #104246] Mon, 27 September 2004 07:39 Go to previous messageGo to next message
sabari...
Messages: 2
Registered: September 2004
Junior Member
The two terms DBMS and RDBMS are often used interchangeably. However the R in RDBMS implies that the database uses the Relational model.

The term RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) is only used with Relational databases (Note: Some relational databases are more Relational than others. There is no specific boundary between relational and non-relational databases.)

The term DBMS (Database Management System) is applied to almost all databases.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104345 is a reply to message #104344] Mon, 27 September 2004 07:52 Go to previous messageGo to next message
sabari...
Messages: 2
Registered: September 2004
Junior Member
The two terms DBMS and RDBMS are often used interchangeably. However the R in RDBMS implies that the database uses the Relational model.

The term RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) is only used with Relational databases (Note: Some relational databases are more Relational than others. There is no specific boundary between relational and non-relational databases.)

The term DBMS (Database Management System) is applied to almost all databases.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104352 is a reply to message #104330] Mon, 27 September 2004 20:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Shuchi
Messages: 2
Registered: February 2003
Junior Member
The rdbms stands for relational database management system, and the dbms stands for database management system. The main difference is that the tables are viewed as relations in rdbms and in dbms the tables are viewed as tables. The rdbms is based on the set theory, and on the principles of Dr. Codd. there are 13 rules of dr. codd which governs how the tables will be designed in the rdbms.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104470 is a reply to message #104064] Sun, 24 October 2004 21:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
preshni
Messages: 1
Registered: October 2004
Junior Member
how rdbms based on set theory.
is dbms not based on set theory.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104479 is a reply to message #103534] Wed, 27 October 2004 01:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
adnan
Messages: 15
Registered: May 2001
Junior Member
A database has to be persistent, meaning that the information stored in a database has to continue to exist even after the application(s) that saved and manipulated the data have ceased to run. A database also has to provide some uniform methods that are not dependent on a specific application for accessing the information that is stored inside the database.

This is a pretty liberal definition of a database. Lotus Notes calls its message stores "databases", and by this definition they qualify. MUMPS calls its associative storage a database, and while it takes a bit of a stretch, even that meets this definition. There are a number of new database technologies that include object-oriented databases and associative databases, and they seem to qualify as databases under this definition too.

Text or flat binary files don't qualify as databases under this definition, since only the application that created one of these files knows enough about the file's contents to make use of the information stored within the file. They meet the persistence part of the DBMS definition, but not the independent access part of the definition.

Other "standards" like the Berkeley DB format supported by Perl, Python, and related languages do more or less qualify as a DBMS. While it isn't what most people think of when they think about DBMS setups, it does meet both the persistence and uniform access conditions for a DBMS.

An RDBMS is a Relational Data Base Management System. This adds the additional condition that the system supports a tabular structure for the data, with enforced relationships between the tables. This excludes the databases that I've listed so far since they either don't support a tabular structure at all, or don't enforce relationships between tables.

Microsoft's Jet database engine qualifies as an RDBMS under this definition, even though it seems like the majority of its users ignore the "relational" side of the engine by failing to declare foreign keys. Individual FoxPro files do not qualify because they don't have any built-in method for declaring or supporting relationships, even though nearly every FoxPro system I've ever seen expects or relies on these relationships.

Most DBAs think of an RDBMS as a client/server system. The database engine runs on a server, and client applications connect and request data from the server. Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, DB2 (both the Z series and the UDB product), and most of the other "industrial grade" databases in use today use this mental model.

No discussion of RDBMS would be complete without mentioning "An Introduction to Database Systems" by Chris Date. This is the present incarnation of the book that originally defined the Relational Model as Edgar F. Codd defined it. You can read more at the Learning Zone.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104512 is a reply to message #104479] Sun, 07 November 2004 22:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
govind singh
Messages: 1
Registered: November 2004
Junior Member
In Reply to: Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS posted by sandeep on October 21, 2004 at 07:51:20:

A database has to be persistent, meaning that the information stored in a database has to continue to exist even after the application(s) that saved and manipulated the data have ceased to run. A database also has to provide some uniform methods that are not dependent on a specific application for accessing the information that is stored inside the database.

This is a pretty liberal definition of a database. Lotus Notes calls its message stores "databases", and by this definition they qualify. MUMPS calls its associative storage a database, and while it takes a bit of a stretch, even that meets this definition. There are a number of new database technologies that include object-oriented databases and associative databases, and they seem to qualify as databases under this definition too.

Text or flat binary files don't qualify as databases under this definition, since only the application that created one of these files knows enough about the file's contents to make use of the information stored within the file. They meet the persistence part of the DBMS definition, but not the independent access part of the definition.

Other "standards" like the Berkeley DB format supported by Perl, Python, and related languages do more or less qualify as a DBMS. While it isn't what most people think of when they think about DBMS setups, it does meet both the persistence and uniform access conditions for a DBMS.

An RDBMS is a Relational Data Base Management System. This adds the additional condition that the system supports a tabular structure for the data, with enforced relationships between the tables. This excludes the databases that I've listed so far since they either don't support a tabular structure at all, or don't enforce relationships between tables.

Microsoft's Jet database engine qualifies as an RDBMS under this definition, even though it seems like the majority of its users ignore the "relational" side of the engine by failing to declare foreign keys. Individual FoxPro files do not qualify because they don't have any built-in method for declaring or supporting relationships, even though nearly every FoxPro system I've ever seen expects or relies on these relationships.

Most DBAs think of an RDBMS as a client/server system. The database engine runs on a server, and client applications connect and request data from the server. Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, DB2 (both the Z series and the UDB product), and most of the other "industrial grade" databases in use today use this mental model.

No discussion of RDBMS would be complete without mentioning "An Introduction to Database Systems" by Chris Date. This is the present incarnation of the book that originally defined the Relational Model as Edgar F. Codd defined it. You can read more at the Learning Zone.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104532 is a reply to message #103534] Thu, 18 November 2004 17:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Puneet Sachdev
Messages: 1
Registered: November 2004
Junior Member
A database has to be persistent, meaning that the information stored in a database has to continue to exist even after the application(s) that saved and manipulated the data have ceased to run. A database also has to provide some uniform methods that are not dependent on a specific application for accessing the information that is stored inside the database.

This is a pretty liberal definition of a database. Lotus Notes calls its message stores "databases", and by this definition they qualify. MUMPS calls its associative storage a database, and while it takes a bit of a stretch, even that meets this definition. There are a number of new database technologies that include object-oriented databases and associative databases, and they seem to qualify as databases under this definition too.

Text or flat binary files don't qualify as databases under this definition, since only the application that created one of these files knows enough about the file's contents to make use of the information stored within the file. They meet the persistence part of the DBMS definition, but not the independent access part of the definition.

Other "standards" like the Berkeley DB format supported by Perl, Python, and related languages do more or less qualify as a DBMS. While it isn't what most people think of when they think about DBMS setups, it does meet both the persistence and uniform access conditions for a DBMS.

An RDBMS is a Relational Data Base Management System. This adds the additional condition that the system supports a tabular structure for the data, with enforced relationships between the tables. This excludes the databases that I've listed so far since they either don't support a tabular structure at all, or don't enforce relationships between tables.

Microsoft's Jet database engine qualifies as an RDBMS under this definition, even though it seems like the majority of its users ignore the "relational" side of the engine by failing to declare foreign keys. Individual FoxPro files do not qualify because they don't have any built-in method for declaring or supporting relationships, even though nearly every FoxPro system I've ever seen expects or relies on these relationships.

Most DBAs think of an RDBMS as a client/server system. The database engine runs on a server, and client applications connect and request data from the server. Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, DB2 (both the Z series and the UDB product), and most of the other "industrial grade" databases in use today use this mental model.

No discussion of RDBMS would be complete without mentioning "An Introduction to Database Systems" by Chris Date. This is the present incarnation of the book that originally defined the Relational Model as Edgar F. Codd defined it. You can read more at the Learning Zone.
Re: Eg of DBMS and RDBMS [message #104600 is a reply to message #104162] Fri, 10 December 2004 07:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Salman Siddiqui
Messages: 1
Registered: December 2004
Junior Member
A database has to be persistent, meaning that the information stored in a database has to continue to exist even after the application(s) that saved and manipulated the data have ceased to run. A database also has to provide some uniform methods that are not dependent on a specific application for accessing the information that is stored inside the database.

An RDBMS is a Relational Data Base Management System. This adds the additional condition that the system supports a tabular structure for the data, with enforced relationships between the tables.

The main advantage of an RDBMS is that it checks for referential integrity (relationship between related records using Foreign Keys). You can set the constraints in an RDMBS such that when a paricular record is changed, related records are updated/deleted automatically

1)rdbms is object based database management system while dbms
2)rdbms can maintain at many users at same time while dbms not

2)in rdbms is relation is more important than object itself

while dbms entity is more important
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104662 is a reply to message #103534] Mon, 27 December 2004 20:44 Go to previous messageGo to next message
pramodmb
Messages: 2
Registered: December 2004
Junior Member
Functionality wise there is no much difference between DBMS and RDBMS. So the basic functionlity remains the same.. i.e both enabling the storing and retrieving the data effectively..
However RDBMS has an edge over DBMS with the mechanisms it provides in storing and retrieval.
RDBMS leads DBMS in
-Security wise RDBMS are better.
- Is used in large organizations where in it would be necessary to store large amount of data.
- has quick retrieval mechanisms

DBMS:
-is used in smaller organizations where in security of it is not of much importance.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104670 is a reply to message #104479] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Abdul Quddus
Messages: 1
Registered: December 2004
Junior Member
Simply RDBMS is an computer based data base and DBMS is a manual like data base just to collect data for a entity. RDBMS depends on relationship between entities...
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104696 is a reply to message #104352] Tue, 04 January 2005 15:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mohanraj
Messages: 2
Registered: March 2004
Junior Member
table of difference between rdbms and dbms and dr.codd's 13 rules in rdbms
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104753 is a reply to message #103534] Mon, 24 January 2005 23:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
mohd akram saifi
Messages: 1
Registered: January 2005
Junior Member
rdbms=dbms+Dr Codd's 12 rules.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104754 is a reply to message #103534] Tue, 25 January 2005 00:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Hashmukh
Messages: 1
Registered: January 2005
Junior Member
Changes made to physical storage representations or access methods do not require change to be made to application program in case of rdbms..

dbms do not support this ...
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104811 is a reply to message #103534] Tue, 08 February 2005 09:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Messages: 39
Registered: March 2002
Member
In DBMS there is no relation among various tables, each table is a separate entity,
In RDBMS there is relation among various tables and several constrints like foriegn key constraint can be aaplied which simplifies the table structures,attributes can be refernced from another table without repeating them.
Re: Difference between RDBMS & DBMS [message #104864 is a reply to message #103534] Wed, 16 February 2005 00:32 Go to previous message
Kavitha
Messages: 40
Registered: December 1999
Member
any dbms following E.F.Codds 12 rules is called rdbmsand have relations between tables
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