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Re: How to populate column changes system-wide?

From: Dino Hsu <dino1.nospam_at_ms1.hinet.net>
Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 21:41:13 +0800
Message-ID: <i5p1ptcs7005t3onensio2cv6t4b61guoa@4ax.com>


Dear all,

Populating column changes, I think, is an interesting topic, I would like to share it to all major database groups. A wild guess is that it probably exists in all major applications such as SAP, Sieble, Peoplesoft, and Oracle, but I have no idea on the database part. Please read the questions posed in my prior posts, your comments are highly appreciated.

Dino

On Thu, 30 Aug 2001 20:50:36 +0800, Dino Hsu <dino1.nospam_at_ms1.hinet.net> wrote:

>Dear all,
>
>Today we learned some basics about an ERP package called Axapta (from
>Navision-Dammgaard, www.navision.com). We are impressed by the
>capability that it can populate column changes system-wide with just
>the change made in one place. For example, if we have a column (or a
>type of column) called 'product number', say 7-digit in length, which
>might well exists in hundreds of tables (forms, reports as well), and
>we want to change it to 10-digit later, it is as easy as to change a
>type definition and populate (its term 'synchronize') it, which might
>have cost us months of re-work traditionally. When we see this, we
>also see this is achieved by adding one middle layer called 'extended
>data type' between table definition and the fundamental data types
>such as strings or numbers. (it reminds me of the analog that roles
>are introduced as the middle layer between privilleges and users)
>Table columns are defined with 'extended data types' rather than the
>fundamental data types, so when we make changes to the extended data
>types, all columns of all tables in the system with this data type are
>changed at the same time.
>
>As we know that types can be defined as objects in Oracle, but we
>don't see they function as the middle layer as does the package (which
>can store their data either in SQL Server or Oracle). Does anyone know
>how to do this in Oracle without any on-top-of-it package?
>
>One more question, anyone remember when the 'alter table add / modify
>/ drop column' function is supported in Oracle? Thanks in advance.
>
>Dino

On Fri, 31 Aug 2001 11:59:31 +0800, Dino Hsu <dino1.nospam_at_ms1.hinet.net> wrote:

>On Thu, 30 Aug 2001 13:04:40 GMT, nsouto_at_optushome.com.au.nospam (Nuno
>Souto) wrote:
>
>>On Thu, 30 Aug 2001 20:50:36 +0800, Dino Hsu
>><dino1.nospam_at_ms1.hinet.net> wrote:
>>
>>>As we know that types can be defined as objects in Oracle, but we
>>>don't see they function as the middle layer as does the package (which
>>>can store their data either in SQL Server or Oracle). Does anyone know
>>>how to do this in Oracle without any on-top-of-it package?
>>
>>The Object relational manual in th standard ORACLE distribution
>>discusses this very same subject at length and with plenty of
>>examples. I suggest a gander that way. Fully supported. And you can
>>even refer to them from Java through JDBC! Try that with SS...
>>
>>>
>>>One more question, anyone remember when the 'alter table add / modify
>>
>>Version 4.
>>
>>>/ drop column'
>>
>>Version 8i.
>>
>>
>>Cheers
>>Nuno Souto
>>nsouto_at_optushome.com.au.nospam
>
>Dear Nuno & all,
>
>I have spent hours reading the Application Guide - Object Relational
>Features, I have found nothing related to my underlined question, just
>explanations about objects, types, methods, attributes, references,
>collections, etc.. Can you give more specific information?
>
>An object model is usually meant to hold the business logic (thus
>objects) and stand as the middle tier between application client and
>database server, however, it takes more time to plan a 3-tier
>architecture (object-oriented or object-based) than 2-tier
>(relational), I wonder how many businesses have done this. As to the
>object model provided by Oracle, I also wonder how many of Oracle
>users directly utilize it in their applications, because many
>applications, such as Axapta, will utilize their own object model
>solutions (an application server or an object model server) instead of
>utilizing the one provided by the database. In short, I would doubt
>that databases today are used more relationally than used
>object-orientedly.
>
>By the way, I remember in a Data Warehousing/Mining seminar, the
>concept of 'data administrator' (not 'database administrator') is
>defined. A data administrator is, unlike a DBA, not preferrably a
>technical person, and is responble for modling the business meta-data.
>The reason is simple, the meta-data is meant to be shared and
>understood by all departments, not by IT alone. Again, I wonder how
>many businesses have done this.
>
>Any comments about the above-mentioned topics are highly appreciated.
>
>Dino
Received on Sat Sep 01 2001 - 08:41:13 CDT

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