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OOW14 : One week in a nutshell

Luc Bors - Tue, 2014-10-14 05:26

PeopleTools 8.54 will be the last release to certify Crystal Reports

Javier Delgado - Mon, 2014-10-13 16:49
It was just a question of time. In July 2011, Oracle announced that newly acquired PeopleSoft applications would not include a Crystal Reports license. Some years before, in October 2007, Business Objects was acquired by SAP. You don't need to read Machiavelli's Il Principe to understand why the license was now not included.

In order to keep customer's investment on custom reports safe, Oracle kept updating Crystal Reports certifications for those customers who purchased PeopleSoft applications before that date. In parallel, BI Publisher was improved release after release, providing a viable replacement to Crystal Reports, and in many areas surpassing its features.

Now, as announced in My Oracle Support's document 1927865.1, PeopleTools 8.54 will be the last release for which Crystal Reports will be certified, and support for report issues will end together with the expiration of PeopleSoft 9.1 applications support.








PeopleTools 8.54 was just released a couple of months ago, so there is no need to panic, but PeopleSoft applications managers would do well if they start coming up with an strategy to convert their existing Crystal Reports into BI Publisher reports.

Extending SaaS with PaaS free eLearning lectures

Angelo Santagata - Mon, 2014-10-13 16:17

Hey all,

Over the last 4 months I've been working with some of my US friends to create a eLearning version of the PTS SaaS extending PaaS workshop I co-wrote....., Well the time has come and we've published the first 4 eLearning seminars, and I'm sure there will be more coming.

Check em out and let me know what you think and what other topics need to be covered.

https://apex.oracle.com/pls/apex/f?p=44785:24:0::::P24_CONTENT_ID,P24_PREV_PAGE:10390,24

Managing your Database in a Zombie Apocalypse

Steve Karam - Sun, 2014-10-12 08:00
Zombie Server Room

Only two things are really certain: network latency over long distances, and the fact that humanity will soon rapidly degenerate into undead brain-eaters.

When that day comes, when the dead are crowding at your door and the windows are busted out and ripped up rotted arms are clawing at the inside of your home, I know what you’ll be thinking: is my database protected?

Don’t worry, my friends. The Oracle Alchemist has you covered. We just need to zombie-proof your DR plan. Let’s get started.

Getting the Power Back

Hopefully you did the smart thing and figured out how much battery and generator power you’d need to survive multiple years of failing power systems due to zombies. I know I did.

However, if you didn’t get this critical task done you may still have some options. Statistics show that the demand for U.S. gasoline was 8.73 million barrels in 2012. That comes out to 23,917.80821917808219 barrels per day of fuel that’s out there just waiting for you to snatch it up. The problem is going to be getting it. You’ll need to load yourself down with lots of weaponry and strike out in a fuel truck a few times a week, which will definitely take away from your database administration time. It’s a smart idea to enable a lot of automation and monitoring to take care of things while you’re out.

Zombie Gas StationYou’re going to need to fight other groups of surviving IT for fuel. This means you’re going to need friends. The way I see it, you have two choices: SysAdmins and Developers. They’re the two groups you work closest with as a DBA, so they’re the most likely to have your back when the dead walk. Start your planning now. If you want to get the developers on your side, tune some queries for them. Seriously, nothing will convince a developer to slice through the brain base of a walker like adding some key indexes when a query goes south during testing. However, if you think the SysAdmins are more likely to fight off rival gangs of resource hogs on the prowl for food and fuel, you can make them feel good by keeping all your filesystems cleaned up and RAM usage at a minimum.

The Problem with Zombies

Remember, the walking dead are tenacious. You remember before the apocalypse when a bunch of reporting users would all log into the database and run huge ad hoc queries against PROD without thinking about what they were doing? That was nothing. Zombies are the real deal. They will tear through a database faster than a multi-terabyte cartesian product. You can deploy outside the box now increase your chances of having a clone out there somewhere, just in case. If you want that database to survive, you’re going to need standbys. Lots of them.

I’d recommend a hub and spoke configuration. One central production database, at least 5 standby databases. As everybody knows, the chances of a zombie bringing down a database are roughly 89.375%. With 5 standby environments, you can drastically reduce the odds of being left without a standby system. On the plus side, zombies are completely brainless. What this means is that you don’t have to worry about masking or obfuscating your backup data in any way. Even on the off chance one of them kicks off a query (even zombies can figure out SQL Developer), they won’t be able to comprehend your users’ personal data, and with the complete downfall of the dollar it won’t matter if they see any credit information. So rest easy.

When All Else Fails

At some point, the zombies are going to come for you. Sorry, but it’s a statistical fact and there’s not much we can do about that. At that moment, when all hope is lost, you’re really going to need to protect your database because once you become a zombie too there really won’t be anyone left and you won’t be focused on maintaining it anymore; you’ll be focused on acquiring copious amounts of human flesh.

Zombie Server RoomSo make your last stand count. You’re a soon-to-be-undead DBA, act like it! Remember how we tune. Eliminate the wait, punch through the bottlenecks, make efficient use of processing power. Don’t get trapped between a rack and a hard place. If you have to play a game of circle-the-Exadata in order to get away, go for it, but don’t let them corner you. And whatever you do, make sure you keep your badge with you. The last thing you need is to hit a door you can’t get through without the proper credentials. Above all else: remember to kick off a backup before they finally take you. I’d recommend having the script ready and running on the console just in case you have to hit a quick key.

Good luck. You’re going to need it.

The post Managing your Database in a Zombie Apocalypse appeared first on Oracle Alchemist.

Latest Oracle allows SELECT without SELECT...FOR UPDATE

Gary Myers - Sat, 2014-10-11 22:11
Digging through a backlog of Oracle blogs, I came across an gem in a presentation from AMIS (on Slideshare). Got to bullet point 5 on slide 63 and boom !

You all know that when you grant SELECT on a table to a user, they can do a SELECT FOR UPDATE, locking records in the table and preventing other updates or deletes. [Some client tools may do that in the background. ]

Well finally Oracle have cottoned on to that too, and there's a lighter-weight "READ" privilege in 12.1.0.2 which won't allow SELECT FOR UPDATE.

This will make DBAs very happy. Actually it won't. The natural state of a DBA is grumpy, at least when in the vicinity of a developer or salesman.


PS. Why would SELECT FOR UPDATE ever be a good idea for a user with no UPDATE privilege ?
If I had to guess, I'd say it went back to a 'pre-read consistency' model when you might use a SELECT FOR UPDATE to try to select data that wasn't being updated.

Kscope15 Abstract deadline is Wednesday, October 15!

Tim Tow - Sat, 2014-10-11 14:08
Kscope15 abstract submission will close in just a few days and the ODTUG content teams want you!

I am sure there are many of you who have never done a presentation at a conference and may not feel comfortable speaking in public. Well, I have a secret for you, despite the fact that I won the Best Speaker Award at Kscope14, I share your discomfort with speaking. What works for me, however, is that I only speak about topics that I know very well. Do you have some area of expertise that you know really well? If you do, please share it! It will be fun and all of your peers who learn something new, from you, will appreciate it!

With that, take the next step and click here to submit session!
Categories: BI & Warehousing

Advanced Sessions for Oracle Open World Conference 2015

VitalSoftTech - Fri, 2014-10-10 14:44
As database gurus and fanatics of the world, as well as hotels and cabbies of San Francisco know, one of the largest events the Oracle Open World conference ..
Categories: DBA Blogs

October WEBCAST - Oracle Access Management 11g Integration with E-Business Suite

Chris Warticki - Fri, 2014-10-10 09:20

E-Business Suite Applications Technology Group (ATG)

Advisor Webcast Program – October 2014

October 2014 WEBCAST - Oracle Access Management 11g Integration with E-Business Suite

When :      Thursday October 16, 2014

                   at 18:00 UK / 10:00 PST / 11:00 MST / 13:00 EST

This one-hour advisor webcast is recommended for technical users, system administrators, Database Administrators, etc. who are planning to integrate the Oracle Access Management product in an E-Business Suite  Environment, to use Single-Sign-On.

Topics Included:

·         Oracle Identity and Access Management  11g – The Big Picture.

·         Oracle Access Manager  vs. Oracle Single Sign-On Server.

·         What is Oracle Access Manager 11g.

·         Evaluate the Current SSO Situation. 

   Build/New

   Migrate/Upgrade

·         Oracle Access Manager Certifications with the E-Business Suite.

·         Demonstration

·         Troubleshooting Oracle Access Manager 11g.

·         Q&A

Details & Registration : Note 1928382.1

Direct link to register for the Webcast.

If you have any question about the schedules or if you have a suggestion for an Advisor Webcast to be planned in future, please send an E-Mail to Ruediger Ziegler.

Another Great OpenWorld

Steve Karam - Fri, 2014-10-10 06:00
Steve at the Delphix Booth

Last week I attended Oracle OpenWorld 2014, and it was an outstanding event filled with great people, awesome sessions, and a few outstanding notable experiences.

Personally I thought the messaging behind the conference itself wasn’t as amazing and upbeat as OpenWorld 2013, but that’s almost to be expected. Last year there was a ton of buzz around the introduction of Oracle 12c, Big Data was a buzzword that people were totally excited and not too horribly burnt out on, and there was barely a cloud in the sky. This year cloud it was cloud all about cloud the Cloud cloud (Spoiler alert: it was the Cloud all along) which just didn’t have that same excitement factor.

But it’s still OpenWorld, set in the heart of San Francisco with tens of thousands of buzzing Oracle faithful. And therefore it was still a pretty awesome time.

Jonathan Lewis at the Delphix BoothThis year I went representing Delphix, and man did we represent. The enthusiasm and technical curiosity were evident as our booth filled up for three days straight with folks eager to hear the good news of the data virtualization. I have to say, the DBA in me finds the promise of syncing databases to a software platform that can provision full-size, read/write clones in a couple minutes with no additional disk usage quite alluring. But there was more to the message than the technology behind the platform; there were also a plethora of use cases that captured people’s attention. Faster and more on-time business intelligence and analytics, application and database testing, regulatory compliance, and more. If that wasn’t enough, we also had Jonathan Lewis, Tim Gorman, Kyle Hailey, Ben Prusinski, and yours truly speaking at the booth which was a great bit of fun and drew a lot of folks that wanted to learn more.

On Monday I was honored to be invited back on SiliconAngle’s conference web show theCUBE to talk about copy data, Delphix, the Cloud (that should be fun for people running Cloud to Butt), Oracle’s strategy, and more. They had not one but two booths at OpenWorld this year. The always charismatic and ever savvy Dave Vellante and I had an outstanding chat, which you can see right here!

Another fantastic part of the conference was OakTable World, which is technically not part of OpenWorld…rather, it is a “secret” conference-within-a-conference. Held at the Children’s Museum nestled in the bosom of the Moscone Center (yay visuals), this conference features a lineup of incredibly technical folks talking about incredibly technical things to the wonder and amazement of all. This year was no different, with a great assortment of no-nonsense presentations. On the 2nd day of OakTable World there was also something I liked to call the Attack of the Attacks: #CloneAttack, #RepAttack, and #MonitorAttack. This event featured Delphix, DBVisit, and SolarWinds Confio and allowed people to get the software installed on their own laptops for tinkering, learning, and testing.

Pythian put on a couple exciting events as always, with the Friends of Pythian party on Monday night and the OTN Blogger Meetup on Wednesday. Both events were a blast as always, with a huge assortment of members of the Oracle community and beyond. Honestly, it’s worth going just for the good food and to see Alex Gorbachev stand up on a booth bench and try to hush a crowd of buzzing datafiends.

All in all it was an outstanding OpenWorld and it was great catching up with some amazing and brilliant people. I can’t wait to see you all again next year!

The post Another Great OpenWorld appeared first on Oracle Alchemist.

Generating Sales Cloud Proxies using Axis? Getting errors?

Angelo Santagata - Thu, 2014-10-09 11:40

If your generating SOAP proxies using Apache Axis/2 you may find yourself hitting strange errors.. Whats even stranger is that you can generate proxies using JDeveloper and it works fine in tooling like SOAPUI.. Well help is at hand..

The most common error is

IWAB0399E Error in generating Java from WSDL:  java.lang.RuntimeException: Unknown element _value

I'm not sure if this is a bug in Fusion Sales Clouds base tech (ADFBC SDOs) or a bug in Apache Axis but there is a workaround and engineering are looking into this.

For a workaround you have two options

  1. Use adb binding and set the flag –Eosv to turn off strict validation.
  2. Use JDK xjc command to generate the JAXB classes:
  3. e.g. xjs -wsdl http://<salescloudsoapendpoint/opptyMgmtOpportunities/OpportunityService?WSDL

Enjoy and let me know if this works for you :-) 

 

Angelo 

Accounting Hub Reporting Cloud Service

David Haimes - Thu, 2014-10-09 10:01

SunburstSo what is this new service and why was it such a big focus at Oracle OpenWorld this year?

  • It’s a very exciting opportunity to experience the powerful Financial Reporting innovations in our Cloud offerings without disruption to your existing ERP investments.
  • It’s a way to take advantage of the Simplified Financials Report Center, optimized for easy access to reports on your choice of mobile device
  • It includes the sunburst data visualization tool, which was my killer demo last week at OpenWorld (see screen shot)
  • It’s a way to move to cloud in an incremental manner, realizing business benefits quickly without disruption to your existing business processes and systems.
  • It has a companion EBusiness Suite feature (available on 12.1.3 and 12.2.4) that will push all your set up and GL Balances to your cloud service and generate reports automatically for you.  Giving you a zero configuration reporting solution for you EBS GL Balances data (watch out for more detailed posts on this soon)
  • It has web services to load General Ledger data from PeopleSoft, JDE Edwards or any other ERP system.
  • It’s a way to get your hands on the Oracle Social Network which is part of the platform our Cloud offerings are built on.

That’s a decent list to start with, but there are a few things that it isn’t which I should call out

  • It is not(yet) the Accounting Hub Integration Platform with all the rule based accounting transformations provided by Subledger Accounting Architecture (SLA)
  • It is not a new name designed to confuse you when we already have Financials Accounting Hub and Fusion Accounting Hub.

Look out for future posts going into more detail, or you can look at the cloud service page, which has important details such as pricing.


Categories: APPS Blogs

The opportunity cost of delaying software releases

Robert Baillie - Thu, 2014-10-09 06:02
Let me paint a simple picture (but with lots of numbers). Some software has been built.  It generates revenue (or reduces cost) associated with sales, but the effect is not immediate.  It could be the implementation of a process change that takes a little time to bed in, or the release of a new optional extra that not everyone will want immediately. It is expected that when it is initially released there’ll be a small effect.  Over the next 6 months there will be an accelerating uptake until it reaches saturation point and levels off. Nothing particularly unusual about that plan.  It probably describes a lot of small scale software projects. Now let’s put some numbers against that. At saturation point it’s expected to generate / save an amount equal to 2% of the total revenue of the business.  It might be an ambitious number, but it’s not unrealistic. The business initially generates £250k a month, and experiences steady growth of around 10% a year. What...

The opportunity cost of delaying software releases

Rob Baillie - Thu, 2014-10-09 05:56
Let me paint a simple picture (but with lots of numbers).

Some software has been built.  It generates revenue (or reduces cost) associated with sales, but the effect is not immediate.  It could be the implementation of a process change that takes a little time to bed in, or the release of a new optional extra that not everyone will want immediately.

It is expected that when it is initially released there’ll be a small effect.  Over the next 6 months there will be an accelerating uptake until it reaches saturation point and levels off.

Nothing particularly unusual about that plan.  It probably describes a lot of small scale software projects.
Now let’s put some numbers against that.

At saturation point it’s expected to generate / save an amount equal to 2% of the total revenue of the business.  It might be an ambitious number, but it’s not unrealistic.

The business initially generates £250k a month, and experiences steady growth of around 10% a year.

What does the revenue generation of that software look like over the first 12 months?
It’s pretty easy to calculate, plugging in some percentages that reflect the uptake curve:

Period Original Business Revenue Software Revenue Generation Additional Revenue1 £250,000.00 0.2% £500.002 £252,500.00 0.5% £1,262.503 £255,025.00 1.1% £2,805.284 £257,575.25 1.6% £4,121.20 5 £260,151.00 1.9% £4,942.876 £262,752.51 2.0% £5,255.057 £265,380.04 2.0% £5,307.608 £268,033.84 2.0% £5,360.689 £270,714.18 2.0% £5,414.28 10 £273,421.32 2.0% £5,468.4311 £276,155.53 2.0% £5,523.1112 £278,917.09 2.0% £5,578.34 Total: £51,539.34
Or, shown on a graph:




So, here’s a question:

What is the opportunity cost of delaying the release by 2 months?
The initial thought might be that the effect isn’t that significant, as the software doesn’t generate a huge amount of cash in the first couple of months.

Modelling it, we end up with this:

Period Original Business Revenue Software Revenue Generation Additional Revenue 1 £250,000.00 £- 2 £252,500.00 £- 3 £255,025.00 0.2% £510.05 4 £257,575.25 0.5% £1,287.88 5 £260,151.00 1.1% £2,861.66 6 £262,752.51 1.6% £4,204.04 7 £265,380.04 1.9% £5,042.22 8 £268,033.84 2.0% £5,360.68 9 £270,714.18 2.0% £5,414.28 10 £273,421.32 2.0% £5,468.43 11 £276,155.53 2.0% £5,523.11 12 £278,917.09 2.0% £5,578.34 Total: £41,250.69
Let’s show that on a comparative graph, showing monthly generated revenue:


Or, even more illustrative, the total generated revenue:


By releasing 2 months later, we do not lose the first 2 months revenue – we lose the revenue roughly equivalent to P5 and P6.
Why?

When we release in P3, we don’t immediately get the P3 revenue we would have got.  Instead we get something roughly equivalent to P1 (it’s slightly higher because the business generates a little more revenue overall in P3 than it did in P1).

This trend continues in P3 through to P8, where the late release finally reaches saturation point (2 periods later than the early release – of course).

Throughout the whole of P1 to P7 the late release has an opportunity cost associated.  That opportunity cost is never recovered later in the software’s lifespan as the revenue / cost we could have generated the effect from is gone.

If the business was not growing, this would amount to a total equal to the last 2 periods of the year.

In our specific example, the total cost of delaying the release for 2 months amounts to 20% of the original expected revenue generation for the software project in the first year.
And this opportunity cost is solely related to the way in which the revenue will be generated; the rate at which the uptake comes in over the first 6 months.

Or to put it another way – in this example, if you were to increase or decrease the revenue of the business or the percentage generation at which you reach saturation point the cost will always be 20%.

So, when you’re thinking of delaying the release of software it’s probably worth taking a look, modelling your expected uptake and revenue generation to calculate just how much that will cost you…

Using Flume - Flexible, Scalable, and Reliable Data Streaming by Hari Shreedharan; O'Reilly Media

Surachart Opun - Thu, 2014-10-09 03:37
Hadoop is an open-source software framework for storage and large-scale processing of data-sets on clusters of commodity hardware. How to deliver log to Hadoop HDFS. Apache Flume is open source to integrate with HDFS, HBASE and it's a good choice to implement for log data real-time collection from front end or log data system.
Apache Flume is a distributed, reliable, and available service for efficiently collecting, aggregating, and moving large amounts of log data.It uses a simple data model. Source => Channel => Sink
It's a good time to introduce a good book about Flume - Using Flume - Flexible, Scalable, and Reliable Data Streaming by Hari Shreedharan (@harisr1234). It was written with 8 Chapters: giving basic about Apache Hadoop and Apache HBase, idea for Streaming Data Using Apache Flume, about Flume Model (Sources, Channels, Sinks), and some moew for Interceptors, Channel Selectors, Sink Groups, and Sink Processors. Additional, Getting Data into Flume* and Planning, Deploying, and Monitoring Flume.

This book was written about how to use Flume. It's very good to guide about Apache Hadoop and Apache HBase before starting about Flume Data flow model. Readers should know about java code, because they will find java code example in a book and easy to understand. It's a good book for some people who want to deploy Apache Flume and custom components.
Author separated each Chapter for Flume Data flow model. So, Readers can choose each chapter to read for part of Data flow model: reader would like to know about Sink, then read Chapter 5 only until get idea. In addition, Flume has a lot of features, Readers will find example for them in a book. Each chapter has references topic, that readers can use it to find out more and very easy + quick to use in Ebook.
With Illustration in a book that is helpful with readers to see Big Picture using Flume and giving idea to develop it more in each System or Project.
So, Readers will be able to learn about operation and how to configure, deploy, and monitor a Flume cluster, and customize examples to develop Flume plugins and custom components for their specific use-cases.
  • Learn how Flume provides a steady rate of flow by acting as a buffer between data producers and consumers
  • Dive into key Flume components, including sources that accept data and sinks that write and deliver it
  • Write custom plugins to customize the way Flume receives, modifies, formats, and writes data
  • Explore APIs for sending data to Flume agents from your own applications
  • Plan and deploy Flume in a scalable and flexible way—and monitor your cluster once it’s running
Book: Using Flume - Flexible, Scalable, and Reliable Data Streaming
Author: Hari Shreedharan
Categories: DBA Blogs

11 Tips To Get Your Conference Abstract Accepted

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Thanks, Craig.11 Ways To Get Your Conference Abstract Accepted
This is what happens when your abstract is selected!Ready for some fun!? It's that time of year again and the competition will be intense. The "call for abstracts" for a number of Oracle Database conferences are about to close.

The focus of this posting is how you can get a conference abstract accepted.

As a mentor, Track Manager and active conference speaker I've been helping DBAs get their abstracts accepted for many years. If you follow my 11 tips below, I'm willing to bet you will get a free pass to any conference you wish in any part of the world.

1. No Surprises! 
Track Manager After A SurpriseThe Track Manager wants no surprises, great content and a great presentation. Believe me when I say, they are looking for ways to reduce the risk of a botched presentation, a cancelation or a no show. Your abstract submissions is your first way to show you are serious and will help make the track incredibly awesome.

Tip: In all your conference communications, demonstrate a commitment to follow through.

2. Creative Title.
The first thing everyone sees is the title. I can personally tell you, if the title does not peak my curiosity without sounding stupid, then unless I know the speaker is popular I will not read the abstract. Why do I do this? Because as a Track Manager, I know conference attendees will do the same thing! And as a Track Manager, I want attendees to want to attend sessions in my track.

Tip: Find two people, read the title to them and ask what they think. If they say something like, "What are you going to talk about?" that's bad. Rework the title.

3. Tell A Story
The abstract must tell a compelling story. Oracle conferences are not academic conferences! There needs to be some problem along with a solution complete with drama woven into the story.

Tip: People forget bullet points, but they never forget a good story.

4. Easy To Read
The abstract must be easy to review. The abstract reviewers may have over a hundred abstracts to review. Make it a good quick read for the reviewers and your chances increase.

Tip: Have your computer read your abstract back to you. If you don't say, "Wow!" rework the abstract. 

5. Be A Grown-Up
You can increase the perception you will physically show up and put on a great show at the conference by NOT putting into your abstract emoji, bullet points, your name and title or pushing a product or service. NEVER copy/paste from a powerpoint outline into the abstract or outline. (I've seen people do this!)

Tip: Track Managers do not want to baby sit you. They want an adult who will help make their track great.

6. Submit Introductory Level Abstracts
I finally figured this out a couple years ago. Not everyone is ready for a detailed understanding of cache buffer chain architecture, diagnosis, and solution development. Think of it from a business perspective. Your market (audience) will be larger if your presentation is less technical. If this bothers you, read my next point.

Tip: Submit both an introductory level version and advanced level version of your topic.

7. Topics Must Be Filled
Not even the Track Manager knows what people will submit. And you do not know what the Track Manager is looking for. And you do not know what other people are submitting. Mash this together and it means you must submit more than one abstract. I know you really, really want to present on topic X. But would you rather not have an abstract accepted?

Tip: Submit abstracts on multiple topics. It increases your chances of being accepted.

8. Submit Abstract To Multiple Tracks
This is similar to submitting both an introductory version of your abstract. Here's an example: If there is a DBA Bootcamp track and a Performance & Internals Track, craft your abstract to Bootcamp version has a more foundational/core feel to it. And craft your Performance & Internals version to feel more technical and advanced.

Do not simply change the title and the abstract can not be the same.  If the conference managers or the Track Manager feels you are trying to game the conference, you present a risk to the conference and their track and your abstracts will be rejected. So be careful and thoughtful.

Tip: Look for ways to adjust your topic to fit into multiple tracks.

9. Great Outline Shows Commitment
If the reviewers have read your title and abstract, they are taking your abstract seriously. Now is the time to close the deal by demonstrating you will put on a great show. And this means you already have in mind an organized and well thought out delivery. You convey this with a fantastic outline. I know it is difficult to create an outline BUT the reviewers also know this AND having a solid outline demonstrates to them you are serious, you will show up, and put on a great show.

Tip: Develop your abstract and outline together. This strengthens both and develops a kind of package the reviewers like to see.

10. Learning Objectives Show Value
You show the obvious value of your topic through the learning objectives. Personally, I use these to help keep me focused on my listener, just not what I'm interested in at the moment. Because I love my work, I tend to think everyone also does... not so. I must force myself to answer the question, "Why would a DBA care about this topic?"

Tip: Develop your learning objectives by asking yourself, "When my presentation is over, what do I want the attendees to remember?"

11. Submit About Problems You Solved
Submit on the topics you have personally explored and found fascinating. Every year, every DBA has had to drill deep into at least one problem. This concentrated effort means you know the topic very well. And this means you are qualified to tell others about it! People love to hear from people who are fascinated about something. Spread the good news resulting from a "bad" experience.

Tip: Submit on topics you have explored and are fascinated with.

How Many Abstracts Should I Submit?
It depends on the conference, but for a big North America conference like ODTUG, RMOUG and IOUG I suggest at least four.

Based on what I wrote above, pick three topics, perhaps create both an introductory and advanced version and look to see if it makes sense to submit to multiple tracks. That means you'll probably submit at least four abstracts. It's not as bad as it sounds, because you will only have perhaps three core abstracts. All the others are modifications to fit a specific need. Believe when you receive the acceptance email, it will all be worth it!

See you at the conference!

Craig.


Categories: DBA Blogs

Is Oracle Application Express supported?

Joel Kallman - Wed, 2014-10-08 13:38

Time to clear up some confusion.

In the past 60 days, I have encountered the following:
  • Two different customers who said they were told by Oracle Support that "APEX isn't supported."
  • An industry analyst who asked "Is use of Oracle Application Express supported?  There is an argument internally that it cannot be used for production applications."
  • A customer who was told by an external non-Oracle consultant "Oracle Application Express is good for a development environment but we don't see it being used in production."  I'm not even sure what that means.
To address these concerns as a whole, let me offer the following:
  1. Oracle Application Express is considered a feature of the Oracle Database.  It isn't classified as "free", even though there is no separate licensing fee for it.  It is classified as an included feature of the Oracle Database, no differently than XML DB, Oracle Text, Oracle Multimedia, etc.
  2. If you are licensed and supported for your Oracle Database, you are licensed and supported (by Oracle Support) for Oracle Application Express in that database.  Many customers aren't even aware that they are licensed for it.
  3. If you download a later version of Oracle Application Express made available for download from the Oracle Technology Network and install it into your Oracle Database, as long as you are licensed and supported for that Oracle Database, you are licensed and supported (by Oracle Support) for Oracle Application Express in that database.
  4. Oracle Application Express is listed in the Lifetime Support Policy: Oracle Technology Products document.

As far as the customers who believed they were told directly by Oracle Support that Oracle Application Express isn't supported, there was a common misunderstanding.  In their Service Requests to Oracle Support, they were told that Oracle REST Data Services (formerly called Oracle Application Express Listener, the Web front-end to Oracle Application Express) running in stand-alone mode isn't supported.  This is expressed in the Oracle REST Data Services documentation.  However, this does not pertain to the supportability of Oracle Application Express.  Additionally, a customer can run Oracle REST Data Services in a supported fashion in specific versions of Oracle WebLogic Server, Glassfish Server, and Apache Tomcat.  To reiterate - running Oracle REST Data Services in standalone mode is the one method which is not supported in production deployments, as articulated in the documentation - however, you can run it supported in Oracle WebLogic Server, Glassfish Server and Apache Tomcat.

Oracle Application Express has been a supported feature of the Oracle Database since 2004, since it first shipped as Oracle HTML DB 1.5 in Oracle Database 10gR1.  Every subsequent version of Oracle Application Express has been supported by Oracle Support when run in a licensed and supported Oracle Database.  Anyone who says otherwise is...confused.

How do I type e acute (é) on Windows 8

Robert Baillie - Wed, 2014-10-08 09:32
I keep on forgetting how to type é on Windows 8 (I used to CTRL+ALT+e, but that's now often reserved for the Euro symbol) I then tend to run a search on Google, and end up being pointed towards 8 year old answers that point you to character map, options in old version of word, or the old way of typing the extended ASCII character code. They all suck. And then I remember - it's easy. You start by pressing a CTRL + a key that represent the accent, then type the letter you want accented. For example, CTRL + ' followed by e gives you é. Brilliant! The great thing about using this technique is that the characters you use (dead letters) are representative of the accents you want to type. This makes them much easier to remember than the seemingly random character codes Here are the ones I know about: KeystrokesAccent typeExamplesCTRL + 'acuteéCTRL + `graveèCTRL + SHIFT + 6 / CTRL + ^circumflexêCTRL + ,cedillaçCTRL + ~perispomeneõCTRL + SHIFT + 7 / CTRL + &Diphthongs / others a =...

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