Re: Examples of SQL anomalies?

From: JOG <jog_at_cs.nott.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 3 Jul 2008 19:35:32 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <10fdcadb-40c9-4de2-9280-6ccb997c738c@d77g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>


On Jul 4, 3:04 am, David BL <davi..._at_iinet.net.au> wrote:
> On Jul 4, 12:35 am, JOG <j..._at_cs.nott.ac.uk> wrote:
>
> > I normally accord to the definitions:
>
> > information = datum + meaning
> > datum = value + description
>
> > These are useful, succinct and accord nicely with [ISO 2382-1:1984]:
> > “Data: A representation of facts, concepts, or instructions in a
> > normalized manner suitable for communication, interpretation, or
> > processing by humans or by automatic means”, while giving something a
> > bit more formalized in terms of data theory.
>
> > In terms of defining value both the output of a function or the
> > element of a set seem fine, but then defining a value as being some
> > amount or quantity also seems fine.
>
> I agree with
>
> information = datum + meaning
>
> I think the distinction between value and data/information has to do
> with the distinction between value and variable. A value doesn't have
> a context in time/space and therefore cannot in itself be regarded as
> data or information. As Bob says, “a value just is".
>
> A variable is a holder for an encoded value. I would suggest
>
> datum = encoded value
>
> An encoded value means an “appearance of a value” using C.Date
> terminology and this occurs in time and space and therefore we can say
> it has a context.

Well, I wonder if this is the same thing, just said in different vocab - the appearance you talk about is just the description I refer to. Received on Thu Jul 03 2008 - 21:35:32 CDT

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