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Re: What databases have taught me

From: Bob Badour <bbadour_at_pei.sympatico.ca>
Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2006 08:29:04 GMT
Message-ID: <kbMog.3573$pu3.87132@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca>


Marshall wrote:
> erk wrote:
>

>>Marshall wrote:
>>
>>>First of all, while a lot of ink is being consumed discussing ruby and
>>>python, please note that virtually all commercial software activity
>>>is happening with C++ and Java.
>>
>>Agreed. I just think the ink may be a harbinger of future trends, and
>>would rather the ink were on more worthy languages.

>
> I am sceptical of the ink as a harbinger, though of course only
> time will tell. For a few years I maintained a regular database
> that recorded weekly the count of Google results for phrases
> like "java programming language" and "python programming
> language" to see if I could spot any trends, but the results
> were uninteresting. If there was one clear result it indicated,
> it was that Java was declining in relevance, which has turned
> out to be the opposite of true, at least in the last few years
> since I stopped.
>
> I note that even back then, the amount of ink that Python
> received was comparable to the amount Java or C++ received,
> even though, then as now, there are 20:1 more jobs for the
> latter compared to the former.
>
> I also note (perhaps recklessly) than no dynamically typed
> language has ever achieved any significant marketshare,
> and that historically languages trickle down from academia
> and research institutions, and not up from the trenches.

Have you forgotten VisiCalc, Clipper and Turbo Pascal?

[snip] Received on Thu Jun 29 2006 - 03:29:04 CDT

Original text of this message

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