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Re: Domain

From: Bob Badour <bbadour_at_golden.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 23:50:17 -0500
Message-ID: <w-OdnYZfAY49yG-i4p2dnA@golden.net>

"Marshall Spight" <mspight_at_dnai.com> wrote in message news:QsrIb.18039$xX.56104_at_attbi_s02...
> "Christopher Browne" <cbbrowne_at_acm.org> wrote in message news:bst3a8$16mcb$1_at_ID-125932.news.uni-berlin.de...
> > In an attempt to throw the authorities off his trail, "Marshall Spight"
<mspight_at_dnai.com> transmitted:
> > >
> > > I take it from this question that you're thinking I'm thinking C++
> > > and Java are state-of-the-art in programming languages. They aren't.
> > > (They are state-of-the-art in being popular, though.) I'm more
> > > interested in things like Haskell.
> >
> > Well, when those were the languages mentioned, and you made no mention
> > of Haskell/ML/Cecil/Self (which _do_ involve some advances in type
> > systems), it sure _seems_ reasonable to consider you probably meant
> > C++ to be "an advance" in this regard.

>
> I don't see it. I was talking about how a lot of activity in computer
> languages happened in universities and research labs before becoming
> commercialized, in contrast to what's happening with SQL, where the
> activity is all commercial in origin. I gave AT&T CFront -> Visual C++
> as an example of a programming language that went from a research
> setting to a commercial setting.

Are you suggesting that SQL never started in a research setting?

Not that it is very relevant, but that's news to me. Received on Tue Dec 30 2003 - 22:50:17 CST

Original text of this message

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