Re: The Revenge of the Geeks

From: BGB <cr88192_at_hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2013 23:06:05 -0600
Message-ID: <kdt3uj$d0l$1_at_news.albasani.net>



On 1/24/2013 9:17 PM, Arne Vajh°j wrote:
> On 1/24/2013 10:10 PM, BGB wrote:
>> On 1/24/2013 4:58 PM, Arne Vajh°j wrote:
>>> On 1/24/2013 5:10 PM, BGB wrote:
>>>> otherwise, not entirely sure why developing for these would be all that
>>>> much different than dealing with a normal PC or Linux box.
>>>
>>> It is not the type of box that makes a difference.
>>>
>>> You can run a Java EE app server on your laptop.
>>>
>>> You laptop does just not have the IO system and the 24x7
>>> reliability to run in most production contexts.
>>>
>>> The difference in development is the services provided by the
>>> server that the application can utilize if the application follows
>>> the rules.
>>>
>>
>> I have a web-server I am running on an old laptop, it uses Windows XP,
>> Apache, and also has PHP, MySQL, and MediaWiki...
>
> If you decided that you preferred Java over PHP, then
> you would replace PHP with a Java EE web container (Tomcat
> would be obvious) and write your web app using Java EE
> technologies like servlet, JSP and JSF.
>

I use PHP mostly for sake of running MediaWiki, which is probably the biggest/most complicated thing on the site.

my own CGI binaries have typically been written in C and compiled into EXE's before being copied over to the server.

though, PHP does have the advantage that a person doesn't have to recompile it after editing (though, there is the possibility that a web request could come in with the PHP code in an inconsistent state, say because someone was in the middle of editing the code directly on the server or something...).

I had idly considered the possibility of using my own scripting language here, but haven't seen much point.

like, C works well enough, and PHP works even if it does look a little funky.

I had considered the remote possibility of a kind of "pay and register" thing, which would probably work something like: person clicks button, and does paypal thing; it uses a target URL set to the user registration form; after doing this, it probably gives them their user-key (basically, as a glob of ciphered data), and records this into a file.

haven't done so yet, and am currently operating under a "donate if you want to" system, but hardly anyone is making donations, so probably no one would care enough to bother paying and registering either (they would just be like "hay whatever" and not bother, or just warez it or figure out a way to circumvent making a payment or similar via using hacked URLs or something...).

so, I haven't done so yet...

granted, yes, either way I am not exactly making money here (rarely does anyone donate anything, and in the off chance they do, it has been like $0.05 and similar...).

making actually more money on YouTube, as theoretically at least, I have $0.75 on this, from ads on videos, but meh, whatever sometimes... Received on Fri Jan 25 2013 - 06:06:05 CET

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