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FIne Grained Dependencies in Oracle 11g

Dependency Oracle schema is the place where all the Database objects get stored. This make a room for the entire set of objects under the Category of Data Storage ( Tables, Views) and Data Access (Stored Procedure ,Functions ,Packages and Triggers) .These Objects make a reference across all these objects to form the application.This is known as dependency.

Conventional Dependency Model If an Object B is being referrd from object A (ie Object A refers another Object B) , Object A is known as Dependant Object and Object B is Known as referenced Object.

Announcing my upcoming Book on Advanced Oracle PL/SQL Concepts (1Z0-146 Preparation handbook)

Hello,

It gives me great pleasure and honour to announce my upcoming book Oracle Advanced PL/SQL Developer Professional Guide with Pact Publishers. The book 'Oracle Advanced PL/SQL Developer Professional Guide' is focussed on the preparation of OCP (1Z0-146) examination. The book doesn't restricts its scope to the examination but aims to strengthen the advanced concepts in Oracle 11g PL/SQL.

The book has been reviewed by Oracle ACEs Kamran Agayev, Ronald Rood and Mohan Dutta. It is under production and is expected to be released by May, 2012.

Basics of Partition Tables in Oracle

Basics of Partition Tables

Partitioning is a method of splitting an object (a table or index) into separate parts (called partitions) based on some criterion that is assigned to the partition. The criterion might be a date range, a number range, or any other possible value. Imagine, for example, that you have a huge table that is driving you crazy because queries on it are really slow. You get so mad at this table that you take a logical hatchet and begin to slice the table up into many smaller tables is a partition.

Please use ANSI join syntax

The old Oracle join syntax really should be consigned to history.

Script to find Oracle database performance

This single script provides the overall picture of the database in terms of Waits events, Active/Inactive killed sessions, Top Processes (physical I/O, logical I/O, memory and CPU processes), Top CPU usage by users, etc.

[code]set serveroutput on
declare
cursor c1 is select version
from v$instance;
cursor c2 is
select
host_name
, instance_name
, to_char(sysdate, 'HH24:MI:SS DD-MON-YY') currtime
, to_char(startup_time, 'HH24:MI:SS DD-MON-YY') starttime
from v$instance;
cursor c4 is
select * from (SELECT count(*) cnt, substr(event,1,50)

11.2.0.3 Database Certified with E-Business Suite

Oracle 11.2.0.3, the second patch set for the 11gR2 database, is now certified with with E-Business Suite and is available for download in 32 and 64-bit.

You can download it from only your meta link account credential.

Patch No: 10404530

Oracle E-Business Suite Release 11i

Prerequisites

* 11.5.10.2 + ATG PF.H RUP 6 and higher

Certified Platforms

* Linux x86 (Oracle Linux 4, 5)
* Linux x86 (RHEL 4, 5)
* Linux x86 (SLES 10)
* Linux x86-64 (Oracle Linux 4, 5)

Reference partitioning and partitionwise joins

Why do you sometimes not get partitionwise joins? Because the optimizer isn't clever enough. Reference partitioning has many benefits, one of which is that the optimizer understands it. You will always get a partitionwise join if your tables are reference partitioned.

Progress status of an index rebuild or creation, or other long operations.

David Lozano Lucas's picture

When we launch a long operation, such as a RMAN backup or rebuild of a large index, we can come to despair of not having an estimate of the time it may take. We can even come to think that is doing nothing.

For the progress of a long operation we can query the view V$SESSION_LONGOPS, first obtaining the process ID from V$SESSION. In the case of DBA, we know exactly which user is rebuilding the index, so we can simplify it into a single query.

The following example shows the progress of the reconstruction of a partition of an index.

Constraints and performance: you want as many constraints as possible

Several times I have had to deal with people who do not want to define constraints. I have never understood why they don't, because my experience is that the more constraints you can define, the better Oracle will perform. If anyone knows where the idea that not defining constraints is a Good Thing comes from, I would be interested to know.

Following are two very simple examples of constraints allowing the optimizer to develop better plans.

First, foreign key constraints. These give the optimizer a lot of information about the data that may mean it can cut out whole tables from a query.

Partition Exchange by Example

One of the great features about partitioning, and most specifically range-based partitioning, is the ability to load data quickly and easily with minimal impact on the current users using:

alter table call exchange partition data_2007 with table call_temp;