Re: Database comparisons

From: William Muriithi <>
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 13:58:28 -0600
Message-ID: <>


Not sure this would satisfy the auditors. Flashback version query does not capture changes across DDL.

At least this is what I inferred from the documentation when I looked at flashback version

From: <> To: <> Cc: Oracle-L Freelists <> Sent: Mon Jan 11 11:52:07 2010
Subject: Re: Database comparisons

You can use Flashback Version Query to look at all changes to data in a given table, if that helps and if the UNDO is available.


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From: Dennis Williams <> To:
Sent: Mon, January 11, 2010 10:24:35 AM Subject: Database comparisons


We have an audit finding related to data integrity. I'm looking for a way to detect all database changes on a small test database. Fortunately the environment is well-contained. Typically when we've made application changes, we verify that the data changes are what we expect. The auditors are insisting that we somehow verify there aren't unexpected changes in other tables. The environment is Oracle on Solaris. I have three thoughts:

  1. The test database is freshly loaded from an export. After the tests, take an export and use UNIX "diff" and compare with the import.
  2. Log Miner, or somehow more directly inspecting the archive logs.
  3. Use some of the new flashback features to detect changes. This just occurred to me and I haven't had time to investigate it.

Has anyone else done anything like this before?

Dennis Williams

Received on Mon Jan 11 2010 - 13:58:28 CST

Original text of this message