Re: datapump export to pipe

From: Robert Freeman <>
Date: Tue, 6 Oct 2009 14:28:43 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <>

I'll tell you that I do not like Oracle's current licensing structure and I think it's completely short sighted on Oracle's part. I had a discussion with someone from Oracle about this at RMOUG about a year ago and while I don't recall the answer he gave I do recall my impression of the answer. That impression was "exactly how rarefied is the air in that office down there in California?" I love Oracle, but I've had customers just get really irritated at the licensing model that they try to cram down our throats. It may well be licensing that will give MS the upper hand at some point in this database battle, but who knows what willl happen in 3 years, 3 months or even 3 days these days...


 Robert G. Freeman
Oracle ACE
Ask me about on-site Oracle Training! RMAN, DBA, Tuning, you name it! Author:
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  • Original Message ---- From: Rich Jesse <> To: Sent: Tue, October 6, 2009 3:21:09 PM Subject: Re: datapump export to pipe

Hey Robert,

> What...? I don't understand this:
> "They've made it clear that exp is no longer supported and that it now costs
> extra for similar functionality from a similar utility."
> impdp/expdp is part of the database server license. They are not charging
> extra for it.

Sorry for the pronoun confusion (mutlitasking problem on my end!). The functionality I referred to was the ability to do on-the-fly compression using common utilities supplied by the OS vendor (e.g. "compress", "gzip", or "bzip2").

In creating datapump, Oracle effectively broke the ability to do on-the-fly compression for exports. 10gR2 added compression, but only for the metadata. And 11g adds the ability to compress actual data on-the-fly, but from examples found with Google, it seems to be using a fixed algorithm, which prevents the customer from being able to choose an algorithm appropriate to the task (CPU vs compression using the aforementioned OS compression utilities). AND they charge the low low introductory price of $11500 PER CPU for this??!??

I could be wrong about the fixed compression algorithm, but the Oracle docs have been inaccessible most of the day.

It's a good day to vent.


Received on Tue Oct 06 2009 - 16:28:43 CDT

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