Re: SQL programming fundamentals

From: Hemant K Chitale <hkchital_at_singnet.com.sg>
Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2008 14:26:19 +0800
Message-Id: <200809130626.m8D6QKj2022715@smtp43.singnet.com.sg>

"Should one distrust any SQL code written by someone without a sound knowledge of relational theory?" and "whether the ability to think in this fashion is in any way dependent on an understanding of relational theory".

I think not. When I see good code or bad code, I do not ask the developer if he understands relational "theory". I do not care to know if his academic background is in mathematics or accountancy or any of the "non sciences". It is quitelylikely -- and I strongly believe that it IS true -- that people can understand tables and data without formal training in relational theory.

Hemant K Chitale
http://hemantoracledba.blogspot.com

At 03:44 AM Saturday, Peter Robson wrote:
>Thanks to you all for many interesting and illuminating contributions.
>
>Two points stand out.
>
>First the issue of 'thinking' in terms of sets when working with
>SQL, of achieving the mind-set jump from the simple procedural
>approach to the set based. It happened so long ago for me that I had
>in fact forgotten just how significant it is!
>
>Which begs the question of whether the ability to think in this
>fashion is in any way dependent on an understanding of relational
>theory. Do you think it is?
>
>Second, and something of a corollary to that latter point, is this.
>Should one distrust any SQL code written by someone without a sound
>knowledge of relational theory? The implications of an affirmative
>to this question are rather considerable, I would have thought...
>nevertheless, your own comments would be much valued!
>
>
>Peter

Hemant K Chitale

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Received on Sat Sep 13 2008 - 01:26:19 CDT

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