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Re: Same old story, windows vs Linux

From: Dan Norris <dannorris_at_dannorris.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2007 14:13:35 -0700 (PDT)
Message-ID: <982220.25719.qm@web35411.mail.mud.yahoo.com>

Just so we're clear, this is quite a different question. My original response was directed at the question "should we use Linux or Windows" and I responded "whichever platform you know best is the best platform for you". 

As for which one runs faster, that is easy to determine, but I don't know of any apples-to-apples comparison except for the published benchmarks (which are usually done on very large hardware configs). Of course, if you're really good at making AIX run faster and really bad at making Windows run faster, then AIX will likely beat Windows even if the hardware-based prediction is otherwise. 

If you change the question to be "which one runs faster on the same hardware: linux or windows" then I think you'll find that question already addressed in numerous online sources (also probably a previous thread from Oracle-L if I were to guess--but I didn't look yet). 

Dan

----- Original Message ----
From: Ted Coyle <oracle-l_at_webthere.com>
To: Dan Norris <dannorris_at_dannorris.com>
Cc: ORACLE-L <oracle-l_at_freelists.org>
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2007 11:03:15 AM
Subject: RE: Same old story, windows vs Linux




 
 


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I should have been more specific.
 

Considering performance only, what would
you say is a good reason to choose one or the other?
 

  
 

My experience is that many hardware
decisions are made based on performance assumptions.
 

  
 

The question:
 

If disk latency is not an issue, which
system runs Oracle faster?
 

Test scenario would be a single user response
time functional test.  I start timing click a button on the screen and stop
when the screen returns.
 

All environments are equal, there is no
network or n-tier latency, only the database connection is changed via TNS
entry update.
 

  
 

$4 Million Vs. My $2000 laptop.
 

-----------------------------------------------------------------
 

My Laptop:
 

Kernel
version:           
Microsoft Windows XP, Multiprocessor Free  32bit
 

Processor
speed:           2.0 GHz
 

Processor
type:           
Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU        
T7200  @
 

Physical
memory:           2038 MB
 

-----------------------------------------------------------------
 

Or this:
 

  
 

2 - CPUs
currently                    
                   
 

1654 - MHz CPU clock
rate             

 

PowerPC_POWER5 -
Processor            

 

64 bit -
Hardware                     

 

64 bit -
Kernel                       

 

Dynamic - Logical
Partition            
 

5.3.0.30 ML02 - AIX Kernel
Version   
 



Model: 
IBM,9117-570  
 




  
 

  
 

  
 

  
 

Ted
 

  
 










From: Dan Norris
[mailto:dannorris_at_dannorris.com] 

Sent: Monday, August 27, 2007
11:24 AM

To: Ted Coyle

Cc: ORACLE-L

Subject: Re: Same old story,
windows vs Linux
 




  
 





I think both speed and concurrency could be very different between x86
and other platform architectures.



As for downsides to using different platforms for non-production and
production, here's a start (I'm sure there are countless others, but I think
these are the major ones, in no particular order):
 


 Platform-specific issues or bugs 
 Performance (obviously) 
 Spreading yourself "too thin"--by this,
     I mean that if you can't focus on a single platform, you'll end up knowing
     a little about many things instead of becoming an expert at one. 


Actually, the list isn't
as long as I thought, but #3 is a pretty big one in my opinion. I'm sure there
are others, but these are the most critical considerations I can think of on a
Monday morning.



Dan
 

  
 














--
http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
Received on Mon Aug 27 2007 - 16:13:35 CDT

Original text of this message

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