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RE: vmware & Oracle

From: Closson, Kevin A <>
Date: Fri, 20 Jul 2007 16:54:14 -0000
Message-ID: <>


>>You don't need to pay for licences for development systems "All software downloads are free, and each comes with a Development License that allows you to use full versions of the products only while developing and prototyping your applications."

...Oh how I knew people harbor that silly misconception. You have to read the license when you download. That very URL has 2 boxes. One to affirm you are not going to export the software to Libya the other says this:

"You may not:
- use the programs for your own internal data processing or for any commercial or production purposes, or use the programs for any purpose except the development of a single prototype of your application; [ text deleted]
- continue to develop your application after you have used it for any internal data processing, commercial or production purpose without securing an appropriate license from us, or an Oracle reseller;"

...the license is for a SINGLE prototype. Once you deploy the app, you have to license it. Then to maintain it (on going development) you have to license your development systems. Note: that other post about having tons of CPUs sitting around to do demos is most certainly not "the development of a single prototype of your application." But then, I'm not the license police. I just suspect that the advent of Linux and "freely downloadable" Oracle bits has eroded the sanctiity of the license. That is, just abou t every Tom, Dick or Harry can build a system capable of running Oracle for dirt cheap and get Oracle bits. I'm a hypocrit then right? No, my use of Oracle software has **always** been under the auspices of companies (Altos, Sequent, IBM, Veritas, PolyServe, HP) that pay (big money) to Oracle to be in the Oracle Partner Network (OPN). All told, if you download anything other than XE and put it on your laptop to do anything other than prototype a single application you are in breach of license. That means, if you are not in the partner network and you develop software that interacts with Oracle (no names but their initials are EnterpriseDB because I bet they are not in OPN) or model interesting proofs on your laptop for a book or blog entry or any other such stuff you are in breach of the license. Bascially, if you make money with what you download, you owe money.

..why am I harping? Because this EnterpriseDB crap has me absolutely steamed. How do you implement an Oracle-compatible free piece of junk without installing Oracle? You know these jokers have instances of Oracle throughout their Lab and support center. Yeah, I'm calling them out.

Received on Fri Jul 20 2007 - 11:54:14 CDT

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