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"Whistler Server" (Windows .NET 2003), Longhorn, Foghorn,

From: Eric D. Pierce <eric_d_pierce_at_pacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 00:13:33 -0800
Message-ID: <F001.0049D7DA.20020722001333@fatcity.com>


The next server after Windows 2000 is going to be called something like:

   "Windows .NET 2003"

Product timeline & roadmap-wise, it roughly approximates the server version of "XP", although they appear to be quite a bit different (see below web sites).

Excerpt from the email Bill Gates sent me about "Trustworthy Computing" last week:

...

| - In addition to providing customers with tools and
| resources to help them maximize the security of
| Windows 2000 Server environments, we are committed
| to shipping Windows .NET Server 2003 as "secure by
| default." We believe it's critical to provide
| customers with a foundation that has been configured
| to maximize security right out of the box, while
| continuing to provide customers with a rich set of
| integrated features and capabilities.

...

For some of the best crystal ball gazing about future versions of windows:

"Whistler Server" (originally "Windows 2002 Server"):

http://www.winsupersite.com/faq/whistler_server.asp

excerpt:

...

   | Windows .NET Server has also been tweaked for better
   | performance and reliability: Microsoft says that the
   | product performs up to 50 percent faster on the same
   | hardware as equivalent Windows 2000 Server products
...

-
http://www.winsupersite.com/reviews/winnetserver_beta3.asp -


Desktop stuff:

http://www.winsupersite.com/faq/longhorn.asp -
http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/longhorn_preview.asp

Here is the basic roadmap for Desktop windows:

august/sept 2002: XP SP1

Sometime in 2003, probably for holiday shopping: XP "Second Edition" (aka XP Super Service Pack, SP2), code named "Longhorn".

"Blackcomb" is the Windows desktop OS after XP. XP was code named "Whistler". "Longhorn" is a bar/saloon on the road between Blackcomb and Whistler.

Gartner Report containing Windows roadmap:

| This is the html version of the file:

> http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/imd-lakehurst/documents/dynamic/technology/Microsofts_Detours_To_Longhorn.pdf

| G o o g l e automatically
| generates html versions of documents as we crawl the web. To
| link to or bookmark this page, use the following url:

> http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:95l0m9ul1scC:www.lakehurst.navy.mi
> l/imd-lakehurst/documents/dynamic/technology/Microsofts_Detours_To_Long
> hor n.pdf+whistler+blackcomb+longhorn&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 

 

| Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor
| responsible for its content. These search terms have been
| highlighted: whistler blackcomb longhorn
     




 Page 1

 GartnerEntire contents 2001 Gartner, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the

information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.

Technology, T-14-2723M. Silver Research Note16

Core Topic Hardware Platforms: Client Platforms Key Issue How will desktop and mobile clientplatforms evolve during the next five years?

October 2001 Microsoft Detours to `Longhorn' on the Way to `Blackcomb' Microsoft's road map for future releases of Windows needsto be carefully understood and kept in mind by enterprises developing their OS upgrade strategies. Microsoft's original road map for Windows anticipated two releases after Windows 2000 ("Whistler" and "Blackcomb,"named after mountains in Canada). Now, in the middle of the two, is a new Windows project - "Longhorn." Microsoft intended to alternate major and minor releases of its newest operating system (OS), delivering them about 18 months apart. Whistler, now known as Windows XP, was supposed to be the minor release following Windows 2000 and Blackcomb themajor release after that. Gartner thinks of Windows 2000 Professional as Windows NT Workstation v.5.0, Windows XP as Windows NT Workstation v.5.1 and Blackcomb as Windows NT Workstation v.6.0. Microsoft's Grand Visions In the mid-1990s, Microsoft had a grand vision, known as Cairo, that was intended to form Windows NT v.5.0. Cairo gradually got bigger and bigger, until it was shelved in favor of getting a competitive product, Windows 2000, out of the door. Windows 2000 was needed to deal with the threat from Java and thin-client systems. However, internally, it seems that Blackcomb isMicrosoft's new grand vision. Cairo was too grand a vision to accomplish in the time allotted toit - i.e., the two years after the launch of NT v.4.0 in 1996. Because of competitive threats, the project slipped by two years and Microsoft did not ship Windows 2000 until February 2000. This left a four-year gap of technology and revenue between the release of NT v.4.0 and Windows 2000. Microsoft cannot let this happen again. Its stock has been down or flat since 1999 and it needs the revenue that new products bring.

> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Page 2 Copyright 2001T-14-272316 October 2001 2
Why Detour to Longhorn?

Microsoft has to keep current to make sure Linux, Mac OS X and other possible challengers do not sneak up from behind and geta foothold while Microsoft's OS technology languishes. It makesperfect sense for Microsoft to ensure it has a reasonable plan for interim releases. It understands that the more revolutionary a release, the more difficult it is for enterprises to implement. Smaller releases allow enterprises to absorb the new technology more easily.

Where Blackcomb was supposed to be Windows v.6.0, Longhorn represents another point release to the Windows 5.x codebase.

We believe Microsoft will endeavor to release anew enterprise client OS every 24 months, and a new consumerOS or enhancement pack every year (see Figure 1).

Good News for Enterprises

This new road map is very good news for enterprises, which face significant problems adopting any new client OS technology, especially for major releases. Windows 2000 is a case in point, Figure 1 ...


http://www.whistler-blackcomb.com
-
http://www.mainframe.org/photos/whistler/longhorn.jpg

I'll leave it to you to figure out if Foghorn or Leghorn are in the picture. :)

regards,
ep

On 19 Jul 2002 at 8:53, MacGregor, Ian A. wrote:

...

> Apparently there is no server edition of XP. I do not know whether that's a temporary or permanent state.

> Microsoft Detours to `Longhorn' on the Way to `Blackcomb'Microsoft's road map for future releases of Windows needsto be carefully understood and
> kept in mind by enterprisesdeveloping their OS upgrade strategies.Microsoft's original road map for Windows anticipated tworeleases after Windows
> 2000 ("Whistler" and "Blackcomb,"named after mountains in Canada). Now, in the middle of thetwo, is a new Windows project - "Longhorn."Microsoft
> intended to alternate major and minor releases of itsnewest operating system (OS), delivering them about 18 monthsapart. Whistler, now known as
> Windows XP, was supposed to bethe minor release following Windows 2000 and Blackcomb themajor release after that.Gartner thinks of Windows 2000
> Professional as Windows NTWorkstation v.5.0, Windows XP as Windows NT Workstationv.5.1 and Blackcomb as Windows NT Workstation v.6.0.Microsoft's
> Grand VisionsIn the mid-1990s, Microsoft had a grand vision, known as Cairo,that was intended to form Windows NT v.5.0. Cairo gradually gotbigger
> and bigger, until it was shelved in favor of getting acompetitive product, Windows 2000, out of the door. Windows2000 was needed to deal with the
> threat from Java and thin-clientsystems. However, internally, it seems that Blackcomb isMicrosoft's new grand vision.Cairo was too grand a vision
> to accomplish in the time allotted toit - i.e., the two years after the launch of NT v.4.0 in 1996.Because of competitive threats, the project
> slipped by two yearsand Microsoft did not ship Windows 2000 until February 2000.This left a four-year gap of technology and revenue between
> therelease of NT v.4.0 and Windows 2000. Microsoft cannot let thishappen again. Its stock has been down or flat since 1999 and itneeds the
> revenue that new products bring.Core TopicHardware Platforms: Client PlatformsKey IssueHow will desktop and mobile clientplatforms evolve during
> the next five years? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Page 2 Copyright 2001T-14-272316 October
> 20012Why Detour to Longhorn?Microsoft has to keep current to make sure Linux, Mac OS X andother possible challengers do not sneak up from behind
> and geta foothold while Microsoft's OS technology languishes. It makesperfect sense for Microsoft to ensure it has a reasonable plan forinterim
> releases. It understands that the more revolutionary arelease, the more difficult it is for enterprises to implement.Smaller releases allow
> enterprises to absorb the new technologymore easily. Where Blackcomb was supposed to be Windowsv.6.0, Longhorn represents another point release
> to the Windows5.x codebase. We believe Microsoft will endeavor to release anew enterprise client OS every 24 months, and a new consumerOS or
> enhancement pack every year (see Figure 1).

> Microsoft Detours to `Longhorn' on the Way to `Blackcomb'Microsoft's road map for future releases of Windows needsto be carefully understood and
> kept in mind by enterprisesdeveloping their OS upgrade strategies.Microsoft's original road map for Windows anticipated tworeleases after Windows
> 2000 ("Whistler" and "Blackcomb,"named after mountains in Canada). Now, in the middle of thetwo, is a new Windows project - "Longhorn."Microsoft
> intended to alternate major and minor releases of itsnewest operating system (OS), delivering them about 18 monthsapart. Whistler, now known as
> Windows XP, was supposed to bethe minor release following Windows 2000 and Blackcomb themajor release after that.Gartner thinks of Windows 2000
> Professional as Windows NTWorkstation v.5.0, Windows XP as Windows NT Workstationv.5.1 and Blackcomb as Windows NT Workstation v.6.0.Microsoft's
> Grand VisionsIn the mid-1990s, Microsoft had a grand vision, known as Cairo,that was intended to form Windows NT v.5.0. Cairo gradually gotbigger
> and bigger, until it was shelved in favor of getting acompetitive product, Windows 2000, out of the door. Windows2000 was needed to deal with the
> threat from Java and thin-clientsystems. However, internally, it seems that Blackcomb isMicrosoft's new grand vision.Cairo was too grand a vision
> to accomplish in the time allotted toit - i.e., the two years after the launch of NT v.4.0 in 1996.Because of competitive threats, the project
> slipped by two yearsand Microsoft did not ship Windows 2000 until February 2000.This left a four-year gap of technology and revenue between
> therelease of NT v.4.0 and Windows 2000. Microsoft cannot let thishappen again. Its stock has been down or flat since 1999 and itneeds the
> revenue that new products bring.Core TopicHardware Platforms: Client PlatformsKey IssueHow will desktop and mobile clientplatforms evolve during
> the next five years? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Page 2 Copyright 2001T-14-272316 October
> 20012Why Detour to Longhorn?Microsoft has to keep current to make sure Linux, Mac OS X andother possible challengers do not sneak up from behind
> and geta foothold while Microsoft's OS technology languishes. It makesperfect sense for Microsoft to ensure it has a reasonable plan forinterim
> releases. It understands that the more revolutionary arelease, the more difficult it is for enterprises to implement.Smaller releases allow
> enterprises to absorb the new technologymore easily. Where Blackcomb was supposed to be Windowsv.6.0, Longhorn represents another point release
> to the Windows5.x codebase. We believe Microsoft will endeavor to release anew enterprise client OS every 24 months, and a new consumerOS or > enhancement pack every year (see Figure 1).
-- 
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-- 
Author: Eric D. Pierce
  INET: eric_d_pierce_at_pacbell.net

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Received on Mon Jul 22 2002 - 03:13:33 CDT

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