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The OraCHEF [message #280311] Tue, 13 November 2007 03:12 Go to next message
Maaher
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Before going to the OraFAQ pub make sure you've eaten a decent meal...

MHE
Re: The OraCHEF [message #280314 is a reply to message #280311] Tue, 13 November 2007 03:19 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Littlefoot
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At the moment, I'm so hungry that I'd eat anything.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #280427 is a reply to message #280314] Tue, 13 November 2007 08:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
vamsi kasina
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Registered: October 2003
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Me toooo!!!!
Time to go home. Cool
Catch you again in few minutes. Laughing

By
Vamsi
Re: The OraCHEF [message #280631 is a reply to message #280311] Wed, 14 November 2007 04:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
pablolee
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Registered: May 2007
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OK, I would love to see this thread take off, so I'll add one of my favourite soup recipes: Broccoli and Stilton
Ingredients
Note All amount are VERY approximate, I change it based on what I’ve got and how I’m feeling J
1 large white onion roughly chopped
1 large leek sliced
good sized knob of butter (It can be missed out if you’re trying to stay a bit healthier)
2 cloves of Garlic crushed
2-4 Large heads of Broccoli broken up into roughly bite-sized pieces
250g Stilton crumbed
¼ pint of cream
1 – 2 Pints Chicken or vegetable stock
Note, salt, pepper and other seasonings should all be done to taste throughout this process.
Melt the butter in a large pot (there should be enough butter to fully cover the base of the pot)
Add the onions garlic and leek to soften (2-3 minutes over a fairly low heat)
Add the broccoli and cover the pot. Leave to simmer on a low heat for a good 10 minutes to help soften the Broccoli. Stir occasionally.
Add enough stock to just cover the veg.
Leave to simmer for a good 30 minutes.
Keep checking the pot and add more stock if you think you need it.(Much of this is down to practice and personal taste)
After 30 minutes. Take the pot off the heat, remove the lid and allow the ‘soup’ to cool.
Once the soup is fairly cool (it doesn’t have to be cold) blend the soup until completely smooth. I use a hand blender, and can even add stock at this point if I feel the soup is still too heavy (e.g. if I intend it to be a starter I want it lighter, but if it’s going to be lunch with bread I want it nice and thick)

At this point, you can just leave it to cool and refrigerate it until it is needed or you can put it back on the heat and once it is nice and hot add the cheese in a little at a time, stirring until it is melted again the amount will depend on your own personal preference but I like quite a lot.

When you are ready to serve, ladle the soup out into bowls and add a swirl of cream on the top and voila, enjoy.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #281088 is a reply to message #280631] Thu, 15 November 2007 12:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
DreamzZ
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Registered: May 2007
Location: Dreamzland
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When you will make it HANDS me a bowl here or either give me a call on
1-800 Go DreamzZ
,and I will be there .

Waiting.........
Re: The OraCHEF [message #281424 is a reply to message #280631] Fri, 16 November 2007 16:10 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Barbara Boehmer
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Registered: November 2002
Location: California, USA
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I just got done eating my hot sandwich with camembert cheese, by making some slight modifications to the recipes on the other thread:

http://www.orafaq.com/forum/t/92362/43710/

It was yummy! Here are the modifications that I used and why:

The recipe that Michel provided said a "hot" oven, but didn't specify what temperature, so I took a wild guess and pre-heated the oven to 350 degrees farenheit and that seemed to be about right.

Instead of using two greased baking dishes, I used one baking tray covered with a sheet of tin foil, because it is easier to crumple up a sheet of tin foil and throw it away than clean a baking dish and I wanted to make it less greasy, so it is neater to handle and healthier.

I placed two large slices of "farmstyle" bread on the tin foil. I didn't want a triple decker that was too big to get my mouth around and messy, but I did want a sandwich with two slices of bread that I could pick up, not just a single slice that needed to be eaten open-face. I didn't want the extra fat or greasiness, so I didn't sprinkle the bread with olive oil.

I placed 2 overlapping folded thin slices (1.6 oz total) lean ham on one slice of bread. I used a minimal amount to try to reduce the fat and sodium content.

I didn't peel the tomato. A lot of the vitamins and minerals and flavor are in the peel and help hold it together. I sliced 1/2 a tomato, then cut the slices into quarters, in order to distribute them evenly on top of the ham. I think I used a wee bit too much tomato. Two slices would have been sufficient. That is the only thing I think I would change in everything that I did. I added a tiny bit of salt and freshly ground black pepper on top of the tomato.

I split the camembert in half and placed one half of the camembert, cut side up (crust side down), on the other slice of bread, saving the other half for tomorrow. I sprinkled a tiny bit of an herbs de provence mixture of rosemary, marojoram, thyme, and savory on top of the camembert.

I put it in the oven and baked it for about 10 minutes, then turned it up to broil for 2 or 3 minutes, until I could see the bread starting to brown.

After taking it out of the oven, the camembert had held its shape, due to the crust, and was still in a small circle in the middle of a larger slice of bread, but was soft, so I used a butter knife to spread it around and cover the bread more evenly.

I put the two slices together, cut them in half, and sat down and ate. With the creaminess of the cheese and the juiciness of the tomato, it was plenty moist and did not need any olive oil or mayonnaise.

I ate it with some steamed zucchini and iced tea. It was a good lunch.

Next time I will try it with bacon instead of ham, as in the other recipe on the other thread.

On the other thread, we were discussing using mayonnaise and some baby spinach leaves. I picked up some spinach dip that consists of sour cream, mayonnaise, water chestnuts, spinach, and so forth, and found that tastes really good spread on the "farmstyle bread" by itself. It could probably be used as a sandwich spread as well.

Re: The OraCHEF [message #281437 is a reply to message #281424] Fri, 16 November 2007 18:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Maaher
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Registered: December 2001
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My gilfriend has spoiled me. She made the original "stoofvlees" (Belgian beef stew). If I see time, I'll post the recipe.

MHE
Re: The OraCHEF [message #281522 is a reply to message #281424] Sat, 17 November 2007 21:50 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Barbara Boehmer
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Registered: November 2002
Location: California, USA
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I just finished eating another sandwich with camembert for dinner using the other half of the camembert that was left after yesterday's lunch. This time I substituted cooked bacon for the cooked ham, but did everything else the same. The bacon has more flavor than the ham, but probably a lot more fat, even though I cooked it well and drained it on a paper towel. Even with the flavor of the bacon, the herbs de provence still stand out. The camembert has a nice creamy texture, but you really don't taste it over the other flavors. It was nice for a change, but I don't expect to indulge in such things often. I will probably continue to use a slice of cheddar or monterey jack or mozarella without the herbs in most of my sandwiches.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #281864 is a reply to message #281522] Mon, 19 November 2007 12:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
DreamzZ
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Rolling Eyes
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283612 is a reply to message #281437] Tue, 27 November 2007 12:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mahesh Rajendran
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Maaher wrote:
>>the original "stoofvlees" (Belgian beef stew).
Made with Goudenband? I was told any Flanders will go good.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283668 is a reply to message #280311] Tue, 27 November 2007 22:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kir_ait
Messages: 198
Registered: November 2007
Location: Bangalore,India
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Mahesh!

Don't you prefer Indian food? Just for curiosity!

Kiran.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283689 is a reply to message #283668] Tue, 27 November 2007 23:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mahesh Rajendran
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>>Don't you prefer Indian food?
If I eat out, NO. Because it is the de facto food I would eat at home. Smile.
To be precise which particular Indian Cuisine are you talking about? There is at least 4 from the state I hail from and around a dozen more very distinctive styles within India.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283722 is a reply to message #280311] Wed, 28 November 2007 00:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kir_ait
Messages: 198
Registered: November 2007
Location: Bangalore,India
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>>To be precise which particular Indian Cuisine are you talking about?

I was'nt talking in specific. Anything you prefere, South or North or.. it seems your from South. Am I right? So you definatley like South style.

Kiran.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283726 is a reply to message #283612] Wed, 28 November 2007 01:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Maaher
Messages: 7062
Registered: December 2001
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Mahesh Rajendran wrote on Tue, 27 November 2007 19:53


Made with Goudenband? I was told any Flanders will go good.
We have tried Leffe once but in the end Westmalle Trappist is the best. You can also make it without the beer. The hardest part is waiting. The stew is best when it has rested for a day.

MHE
Re: The OraCHEF [message #283760 is a reply to message #283726] Wed, 28 November 2007 01:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mahesh Rajendran
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Exactly. I invariably use the Dubbel for most. A friend of mine once said that only Goudenband/Flanders is used in "authentic recipe". Now I got an argument to make Smile
Thanks
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284032 is a reply to message #283760] Wed, 28 November 2007 10:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Frank
Messages: 7880
Registered: March 2000
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c'mon Maarten..
Got a couple of Westmalle's waiting (double & triple). I think you should share the receipe with us now. I don't think I can stay away from the fridge much longer...
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284181 is a reply to message #284032] Thu, 29 November 2007 01:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Maaher
Messages: 7062
Registered: December 2001
Senior Member
Frank wrote on Wed, 28 November 2007 17:51

c'mon Maarten..
Got a couple of Westmalle's waiting (double & triple). I think you should share the receipe with us now. I don't think I can stay away from the fridge much longer...

As it happens, I asked my girlfriend yesterday whether she had a recipe. She said: "It's all in the head". I'll try to write it down but as it's not me who actually prepares it I cannot be held responsible for mistakes. I try to put it down in English.

It comes down to this:
Ingredients
  • 1 kg beef (carbonades flamandes Very Happy) in dices of your own liking (usually with 2-4 cm (1-1.5 inch?) sides)
  • 2 sliced onions
  • butter
  • a slice of bread
  • table spoon of mustard
  • butter
  • pepper, salt, thyme*
  • A bottle of brown beer (optional)


* My girlfirend usually ads a mixture of seasoning she gets from the butcher shop.

Preparation
Dry the meat and season it with the pepper and salt. Put a Dutch oven on the stove and heat it.When the Dutch oven is hot, put the butter in. Wait until the butter is ready (not burnt) and then put the meat in the Dutch oven and let it brown on each side. Put the onions in and let them glaze. I know that most recipes will tell you to put the meat out when processing the onions but my Chef disagreed. Then she just lowers the heat, ads the bread, mustard and the beer (water will do to but it's just not the same Very Happy) to it and lets it simmer for several hours. Note: add engouh liquid so that the meat is covered. Stir lightly from time to time.

Like I mentioned before: the key is to give it time so that the meat is tender.

If it's not clear already, I'm hardly a gourmet chef myself. No guarantees when it comes to this recipe. I'm sure that the Internet is crowded with recipes.

MHE

[edit]Careful with a Dutch oven: it isn't Tefal (non-stick) so you have to watch it.

[Updated on: Thu, 29 November 2007 01:55]

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Re: The OraCHEF [message #284258 is a reply to message #280311] Thu, 29 November 2007 04:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kir_ait
Messages: 198
Registered: November 2007
Location: Bangalore,India
Senior Member

(
Quote:

usually with 2-4 cm (1-1.5 inch?) sides)



!!??

Kiran.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284279 is a reply to message #284258] Thu, 29 November 2007 05:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Maaher
Messages: 7062
Registered: December 2001
Senior Member
@kiran:
- cut the meat in dices/cubes. Each side of the cube is between 2 and 4 cm long. That's approximately 1.5 to 2 inches for those who can't cope with the metric system, right?

MHE
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284289 is a reply to message #280311] Thu, 29 November 2007 05:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kir_ait
Messages: 198
Registered: November 2007
Location: Bangalore,India
Senior Member

Quote:

Each side of the cube is between 2 and 4 cm long


Is the size of meat matter? Is that neccessary meat to be in cubes/dices with size of 2 and 4 cm? Size is fixed?

That's what i meant. Wink
Anyway, I never ever ate any kind of meat as of now!!!
So, the curiosity.


Kiran.
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284290 is a reply to message #284289] Thu, 29 November 2007 05:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Maaher
Messages: 7062
Registered: December 2001
Senior Member
I see. Well it is important to a certain amount: unequal chunks of meat will result in different cooking times. If you want all your meat equally well cooked, you keep the pieces more or less the same.

MHE
Re: The OraCHEF [message #284296 is a reply to message #280311] Thu, 29 November 2007 05:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
kir_ait
Messages: 198
Registered: November 2007
Location: Bangalore,India
Senior Member

Ohh yes, As the meat harder, it takes time to get boil. And if the size more or less equal then all peices take same time to get boil. Thats right.

Kiran.

[Updated on: Thu, 29 November 2007 05:58]

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Re: The OraCHEF [message #477635 is a reply to message #280311] Sat, 02 October 2010 16:13 Go to previous message
Barbara Boehmer
Messages: 8636
Registered: November 2002
Location: California, USA
Senior Member
I just bought one of those "Fasta Pasta" microwave pasta cookers, tried it for the first time, and am loving the convenience. You put the pasta, water, and salt in it, put it in the microwave, and cook it for the appropriate amount of time on the chart that comes with it. It is so much more convenient than using a big pasta pot on the stove-top. I just browse the forums until I hear the bell on the microwave. When it is done, I put the strainer lid on top, carry it to the sink by the cool handles, and strain it. It is a small heavy duty plastic container, so I just add my sauce, take it to my desk and eat it out of the container that I cooked it in while I continue browsing the forums, and only have one non-stick plastic dish to clean when I'm done.

My first dish with the "Fasta Pasta" was some ravioli stuffed with spinach, cheese, and herbs, with Alfredo sauce. My next dish is going to be some tortellini stuffed with chicken and prosciutto with Alfredo sauce. After that I am thinking that I might try some fettuccine with some peas and vegetables added in during the last part of the cooking. I may try a cold pasta salad, by cooking some rotini, letting it cool in the refrigerator, then adding some garbanzo beans, olives, feta cheese, cherry tomatoes, and such and some creamy Italian dressing.

I am looking for some additional prepare and eat all in one dish pasta recipes. Do any of you have any recipes for pasta or things to cook with the pasta or stuff in the pasta or pasta sauces that you would like to share?





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