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performance tuning redo logs [message #188280] Thu, 17 August 2006 15:09 Go to next message
alanm
Messages: 282
Registered: March 2005
Senior Member

Hello All,
I am trying to tune redo logs on a 10gr1 database. I have a FAST_STAR_MTTR_TARGET set and expected to see optimal_logfile_size of v$instance_recovery set, however all I get is '*****'. I though I would see a number of mega byte as suggested by metalink note 274264.1

regards

Alan.
Re: performance tuning redo logs [message #188282 is a reply to message #188280] Thu, 17 August 2006 15:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
nmacdannald
Messages: 460
Registered: July 2005
Location: Stockton, California - US...
Senior Member
FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET enables you to specify the number of seconds the database takes to perform crash recovery of a single instance. When specified, FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET is overridden by LOG_CHECKPOINT_INTERVAL.

Determine the Practical Range for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET
After calibration, you can perform tests to determine the practical range for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET for your database.

Determining Lower Bound for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET: Scenario
To determine the lower bound of the practical range, set FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET to 1, and start up your database. Then check the value of V$INSTANCE_RECOVERY.TARGET_MTTR, and use this value as a good lower bound for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET. Database startup time, rather than cache recovery time, is usually the dominant factor in determining this limit.

For example, set the FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET to 1:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM SET FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET=1;

Then, execute the following query immediately after opening the database:

SQL> SELECT TARGET_MTTR, ESTIMATED_MTTR
FROM V$INSTANCE_RECOVERY;

Oracle responds with the following:

TARGET_MTTR ESTIMATED_MTTR
18 15

The TARGET_MTTR value of 18 seconds is the minimum MTTR target that the system can achieve, that is, the lowest practical value for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET. This minimum is calculated based on the average database startup time.

The ESTIMATED_MTTR field contains the estimated mean time to recovery based on the current state of the running database. Because the database has just opened, the system contains few dirty buffers, so not much cache recovery would be required if the instance failed at this moment. That is why ESTIMATED_MTTR can, for the moment, be lower than the minimum possible TARGET_MTTR.

ESTIMATED_MTTR can be affected in the short term by recent database activity. Assume that you query V$INSTANCE_RECOVERY immediately after a period of heavy update activity in the database. Oracle responds with the following:

TARGET_MTTR ESTIMATED_MTTR
18 30

Now the effective MTTR target is still 18 seconds, and the estimated MTTR (if a crash happened at that moment) is 30 seconds. This is an acceptable result. This means that some checkpoints writes might not have finished yet, so the buffer cache contains more dirty buffers than targeted.

Now wait for sixty seconds and reissue the query to V$INSTANCE_RECOVERY. Oracle responds with the following:

TARGET_MTTR ESTIMATED_MTTR
18 25

The estimated MTTR at this time has dropped to 25 seconds, because some of the dirty buffers have been written out during this period

Determining Upper Bound for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET
To determine the upper bound of the practical range, set FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET to 3600, and operate your database under a typical workload for a while. Then check the value of V$INSTANCE_RECOVERY.TARGET_MTTR. This value is a good upper bound for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET.

The procedure is substantially similar to that in "Determining Lower Bound for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET: Scenario".

Selecting Preliminary Value for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET
Once you have determined the practical bounds for the FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET parameter, select a preliminary value for the parameter. Choose a higher value within the practical range if your concern is with database performance, and a lower value within the practical range if your priority is shorter recovery times. The narrower the practical range, of course, the easier the choice becomes.

For example, if you discovered that the practical range was between 17 and 19 seconds, it would be quite simple to choose 19, because it makes relatively little difference in recovery time and at the same time minimizes the effect of checkpointing on system performance. However, if you found that the practical range was between 18 and 40 seconds, you might choose a compromise value of 30, and set the parameter accordingly:

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM SET FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET=30;

You might then go on to use the MTTR Advisor to determine an optimal value.

Evaluate Different Target Values with MTTR Advisor
Once you have selected a preliminary value for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET, you can use MTTR Advisor to evaluate the effect of different FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET settings on system performance, compared to your chosen setting.

Enabling MTTR Advisor
To enable MTTR Advisor, set the two initialization parameters STATISTICS_LEVEL and FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET.

STATISTICS_LEVEL governs whether all advisors are enabled and is not specific to MTTR Advisor. Make sure that it is set to TYPICAL or ALL. Then, when FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET is set to a non-zero value, the MTTR Advisor is enabled.

Using MTTR Advisor
After enabling MTTR Advisor, run a typical database workload for a while. When MTTR Advisor is ON, the database simulates checkpoint queue behavior under the current value of FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET, and up to four other different MTTR settings within the range of valid FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET values. (The database will in this case determine the valid range for FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET itself before testing different values in the range.)

Viewing MTTR Advisor Results: V$MTTR_TARGET_ADVICE
The dynamic performance view V$MTTR_TARGET_ADVICE lets you view statistics or advisories collected by MTTR Advisor.

The database populates V$MTTR_TARGET_ADVICE with advice about the effects of each of the FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET settings for your database. For each possible value of FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET, the row contains details about how many cache writes would be performed under the workload tested for that value of FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET.

Specifically, each row contains information about cache writes, total phyiscal writes (including direct writes), and total I/O (including reads) for that value of FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET, expressed both as a total number of operations and a ratio compared to the operations under your chosen FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET value. For instance, a ratio of 1.2 indicates 20% more cache writes.

Knowing the effect of different FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET settings on cache write activity and other I/O enables you to decide better which FAST_START_MTTR_TARGET value best fits your recovery and performance needs.

If MTTR Advisor is currently on, then V$MTTR_TARGET_ADVICE shows the Advisor information collected. If MTTR Advisor is currently OFF, the view shows information collected the last time MTTR Advisor was ON since database startup, if any. If the database has been restarted since the last time the MTTR Advisor was used, or if it has never been used, the view will not show any rows.

Re: performance tuning redo logs [message #188283 is a reply to message #188280] Thu, 17 August 2006 15:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
alanm
Messages: 282
Registered: March 2005
Senior Member

thanks but the question asked why I cannot see a value for optimal redolog size. I have all the correct values for MTTR but cannot get to see a value for optimal redo

[Updated on: Thu, 17 August 2006 15:50]

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Re: performance tuning redo logs [message #188486 is a reply to message #188280] Fri, 18 August 2006 13:39 Go to previous messageGo to next message
nmacdannald
Messages: 460
Registered: July 2005
Location: Stockton, California - US...
Senior Member
I set the size of my logfiles to 500M, and I force a log switch about every hour, but that is just me.

Your really don't have to worry much about recovery, as long as it is setup correctly and the right files are backed up nightly.

*Oracle databases don't fail* An O/S can fail or write bad blocks to disk. Set init.ora parameter for checking blocks.

More likely, a user will want data back the they have deleted, try flashback or point in time recovery. Or a disk device will fail, use RAID1 and monitor disk errors.

file_specification::=

Something like:
<filename> size <I use 500M> autoextend off;

This section describes the semantics of file_specification. For additional information, refer to the SQL statement in which you specify a datafile, tempfile, redo log file, or Automatic Storage Management disk group or disk group file.

datafile_tempfile_spec

Use this clause to specify the attributes of datafiles and tempfiles if your database storage is in a file system or on raw devices or in Automatic Storage Management disk groups.

redo_log_file_spec

Use this clause to specify the attributes of redo log files if your database storage is in a file system or on raw devices or in Automatic Storage Management disk groups.

filename

Use filename for files stored in a file system or on raw devices. The filename can specify either a new file or an existing file. For a new file:

If you are not using Oracle-managed files, then you must specify both filename and the SIZE clause or the statement fails. When you specify a filename without a size, Oracle attempts to reuse an existing file and returns an error if the file does not exist.

If you are using Oracle-managed files, then filename is optional, as are the remaining clauses of the specification. In this case, Oracle Database creates a unique name for the file and saves it in the directory specified by either the DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST (for logfiles and control files), the DB_CREATE_FILE_DEST initialization parameter (for any type of file) or by the DB_CREATE_ONLINE_LOG_DEST_n initialization parameter (which takes precedence over DB_CREATE_FILE_DEST and DB_RECOVERY_FILE_DEST for log files).

For an existing file, specify the name of either a datafile, tempfile, or a redo log file member. The filename can contain only single-byte characters from 7-bit ASCII or EBCDIC character sets. Multibyte characters are not valid.

A redo log file group can have one or more members (copies). Each filename must be fully specified according to the conventions for your operating system.

The way the database interprets filename also depends on whether you specify it with the SIZE and REUSE clauses.

If you specify filename only, or with the REUSE clause but without the SIZE clause, then the file must already exist.

If you specify filename with SIZE but without REUSE, the file must be a new file.

If you specify filename with both SIZE and REUSE, then the file can be either new or existing. If the file exists, it is reused with the new size. If it does not exist, the database ignores the REUSE keyword and creates a new file of the specified size.

What Is the Redo Log?
The most crucial structure for recovery operations is the redo log, which consists of two or more preallocated files that store all changes made to the database as they occur. Every instance of an Oracle Database has an associated redo log to protect the database in case of an instance failure.

Redo Threads
When speaking in the context of multiple database instances, the redo log for each database instance is also referred to as a redo thread. In typical configurations, only one database instance accesses an Oracle Database, so only one thread is present. In an Oracle Real Application Clusters environment, however, two or more instances concurrently access a single database and each instance has its own thread of redo. A separate redo thread for each instance avoids contention for a single set of redo log files, thereby eliminating a potential performance bottleneck.

This chapter describes how to configure and manage the redo log on a standard single-instance Oracle Database. The thread number can be assumed to be 1 in all discussions and examples of statements. For information about redo log groups in a Real Application Clusters environment, please refer to Oracle Database Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide.

Redo Log Contents
Redo log files are filled with redo records. A redo record, also called a redo entry, is made up of a group of change vectors, each of which is a description of a change made to a single block in the database. For example, if you change a salary value in an employee table, you generate a redo record containing change vectors that describe changes to the data segment block for the table, the undo segment data block, and the transaction table of the undo segments.

Redo entries record data that you can use to reconstruct all changes made to the database, including the undo segments. Therefore, the redo log also protects rollback data. When you recover the database using redo data, the database reads the change vectors in the redo records and applies the changes to the relevant blocks.

Redo records are buffered in a circular fashion in the redo log buffer of the SGA (see "How Oracle Database Writes to the Redo Log") and are written to one of the redo log files by the Log Writer (LGWR) database background process. Whenever a transaction is committed, LGWR writes the transaction redo records from the redo log buffer of the SGA to a redo log file, and assigns a system change number (SCN) to identify the redo records for each committed transaction. Only when all redo records associated with a given transaction are safely on disk in the online logs is the user process notified that the transaction has been committed.

Redo records can also be written to a redo log file before the corresponding transaction is committed. If the redo log buffer fills, or another transaction commits, LGWR flushes all of the redo log entries in the redo log buffer to a redo log file, even though some redo records may not be committed. If necessary, the database can roll back these changes.

How Oracle Database Writes to the Redo Log
The redo log of a database consists of two or more redo log files. The database requires a minimum of two files to guarantee that one is always available for writing while the other is being archived (if the database is in ARCHIVELOG mode). See "Managing Archived Redo Logs" for more information.

LGWR writes to redo log files in a circular fashion. When the current redo log file fills, LGWR begins writing to the next available redo log file. When the last available redo log file is filled, LGWR returns to the first redo log file and writes to it, starting the cycle again. Figure 6-1 illustrates the circular writing of the redo log file. The numbers next to each line indicate the sequence in which LGWR writes to each redo log file.

Active (Current) and Inactive Redo Log Files
Oracle Database uses only one redo log files at a time to store redo records written from the redo log buffer. The redo log file that LGWR is actively writing to is called the current redo log file.

Redo log files that are required for instance recovery are called active redo log files. Redo log files that are no longer required for instance recovery are called inactive redo log files.

If you have enabled archiving (the database is in ARCHIVELOG mode), then the database cannot reuse or overwrite an active online log file until one of the archiver background processes (ARCn) has archived its contents. If archiving is disabled (the database is in NOARCHIVELOG mode), then when the last redo log file is full, LGWR continues by overwriting the first available active file.

Log Switches and Log Sequence Numbers
A log switch is the point at which the database stops writing to one redo log file and begins writing to another. Normally, a log switch occurs when the current redo log file is completely filled and writing must continue to the next redo log file. However, you can configure log switches to occur at regular intervals, regardless of whether the current redo log file is completely filled. You can also force log switches manually.

Oracle Database assigns each redo log file a new log sequence number every time a log switch occurs and LGWR begins writing to it. When the database archives redo log files, the archived log retains its log sequence number. A redo log file that is cycled back for use is given the next available log sequence number.

Each online or archived redo log file is uniquely identified by its log sequence number. During crash, instance, or media recovery, the database properly applies redo log files in ascending order by using the log sequence number of the necessary archived and redo log files.

Planning the Redo Log
This section provides guidelines you should consider when configuring a database instance redo log and contains the following topics:

Multiplexing Redo Log Files

Placing Redo Log Members on Different Disks

Setting the Size of Redo Log Members

Choosing the Number of Redo Log Files

Controlling Archive Lag

Multiplexing Redo Log Files
To protect against a failure involving the redo log itself, Oracle Database allows a multiplexed redo log, meaning that two or more identical copies of the redo log can be automatically maintained in separate locations. For the most benefit, these locations should be on separate disks. Even if all copies of the redo log are on the same disk, however, the redundancy can help protect against I/O errors, file corruption, and so on. When redo log files are multiplexed, LGWR concurrently writes the same redo log information to multiple identical redo log files, thereby eliminating a single point of redo log failure.

Multiplexing is implemented by creating groups of redo log files. A group consists of a redo log file and its multiplexed copies. Each identical copy is said to be a member of the group. Each redo log group is defined by a number, such as group 1, group 2, and so on.

Placing Redo Log Members on Different Disks
When setting up a multiplexed redo log, place members of a group on different physical disks. If a single disk fails, then only one member of a group becomes unavailable to LGWR and other members remain accessible to LGWR, so the instance can continue to function.

If you archive the redo log, spread redo log members across disks to eliminate contention between the LGWR and ARCn background processes. For example, if you have two groups of multiplexed redo log members (a duplexed redo log), place each member on a different disk and set your archiving destination to a fifth disk. Doing so will avoid contention between LGWR (writing to the members) and ARCn (reading the members).

Datafiles should also be placed on different disks from redo log files to reduce contention in writing data blocks and redo records.

Setting the Size of Redo Log Members
When setting the size of redo log files, consider whether you will be archiving the redo log. Redo log files should be sized so that a filled group can be archived to a single unit of offline storage media (such as a tape or disk), with the least amount of space on the medium left unused. For example, suppose only one filled redo log group can fit on a tape and 49% of the tape storage capacity remains unused. In this case, it is better to decrease the size of the redo log files slightly, so that two log groups could be archived on each tape.

All members of the same multiplexed redo log group must be the same size. Members of different groups can have different sizes. However, there is no advantage in varying file size between groups. If checkpoints are not set to occur between log switches, make all groups the same size to guarantee that checkpoints occur at regular intervals.

The minimum size permitted for a redo log file is 4 MB.

Creating Redo Log Groups and Members
Plan the redo log of a database and create all required groups and members of redo log files during database creation. However, there are situations where you might want to create additional groups or members. For example, adding groups to a redo log can correct redo log group availability problems.

To create new redo log groups and members, you must have the ALTER DATABASE system privilege. A database can have up to MAXLOGFILES groups.

Creating Redo Log Groups
To create a new group of redo log files, use the SQL statement ALTER DATABASE with the ADD LOGFILE clause.

The following statement adds a new group of redo logs to the database:

ALTER DATABASE
ADD LOGFILE ('/oracle/dbs/log1c.rdo', '/oracle/dbs/log2c.rdo') SIZE 500K;

Note:

Use fully specify filenames of new log members to indicate where the operating system file should be created. Otherwise, the files will be created in either the default or current directory of the database server, depending upon your operating system.


You can also specify the number that identifies the group using the GROUP clause:

ALTER DATABASE
ADD LOGFILE GROUP 10 ('/oracle/dbs/log1c.rdo', '/oracle/dbs/log2c.rdo')
SIZE 500K;

Using group numbers can make administering redo log groups easier. However, the group number must be between 1 and MAXLOGFILES. Do not skip redo log file group numbers (that is, do not number your groups 10, 20, 30, and so on), or you will consume unnecessary space in the control files of the database.

Creating Redo Log Members
In some cases, it might not be necessary to create a complete group of redo log files. A group could already exist, but not be complete because one or more members of the group were dropped (for example, because of a disk failure). In this case, you can add new members to an existing group.

To create new redo log members for an existing group, use the SQL statement ALTER DATABASE with the ADD LOGFILE MEMBER clause. The following statement adds a new redo log member to redo log group number 2:

ALTER DATABASE ADD LOGFILE MEMBER '/oracle/dbs/log2b.rdo' TO GROUP 2;

Notice that filenames must be specified, but sizes need not be. The size of the new members is determined from the size of the existing members of the group.

When using the ALTER DATABASE statement, you can alternatively identify the target group by specifying all of the other members of the group in the TO clause, as shown in the following example:

ALTER DATABASE ADD LOGFILE MEMBER '/oracle/dbs/log2c.rdo'
TO ('/oracle/dbs/log2a.rdo', '/oracle/dbs/log2b.rdo');

Note:

Fully specify the filenames of new log members to indicate where the operating system files should be created. Otherwise, the files will be created in either the default or current directory of the database server, depending upon your operating system. You may also note that the status of the new log member is shown as INVALID. This is normal and it will change to active (blank) when it is first used.


Filled redo log files are available to LGWR for reuse depending on whether archiving is enabled.

If archiving is disabled (the database is in NOARCHIVELOG mode), a filled redo log file is available after the changes recorded in it have been written to the datafiles.

If archiving is enabled (the database is in ARCHIVELOG mode), a filled redo log file is available to LGWR after the changes recorded in it have been written to the datafiles and the file has been archived.



Again, I might be answering the wrong question for you. Sorry if that is true.

[Updated on: Fri, 18 August 2006 13:51]

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Re: performance tuning redo logs [message #222082 is a reply to message #188283] Thu, 01 March 2007 12:46 Go to previous message
akimeu
Messages: 5
Registered: March 2007
Junior Member
did you ever find the reason? i came across the same issue, and it seems to be the oracle version that i'm using. i use standard edition, and therefore, this parameter is not available within it.
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