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icon10.gif  Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux [message #111321] Tue, 15 March 2005 10:59 Go to next message
George LAZAR
Messages: 7
Registered: March 2005
Location: Romania
Junior Member

Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux[ 36 votes ]
1. Windows 6 / 17%
2. Unix 18 / 50%
3. Linux 12 / 33%

Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux

[EDIT: Typo]

[Updated on: Tue, 15 March 2005 12:31] by Moderator

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Re: Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux [message #129351 is a reply to message #111321] Sun, 24 July 2005 14:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
nmacdannald
Messages: 460
Registered: July 2005
Location: Stockton, California - US...
Senior Member
How about Solaris?
Re: Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux [message #129385 is a reply to message #129351] Sun, 24 July 2005 23:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Achchan
Messages: 86
Registered: June 2005
Member
I think Solaris is categorized under unix tab.
Re: Oracle 10g on Windows vs Unix vs Linux [message #273793 is a reply to message #111321] Thu, 11 October 2007 12:45 Go to previous message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
FYI, I attended a one day Oracle conference yesterday and found out an interesting thing:

1) Oracle 11g has still only been released only on Linux. Additionally, Oracle was giving away a free version of Linux which I believe was created by Oracle Corp., so that people could download 11g for Linux, using this distribution of Linux.

Wonder what it means?

2) A presentation at the same conference made use of 11g on windows (even though it is not yet released). They are claiming Oracle on Windows currently gives best price/performance ROI of any database on any platform. This was not the purpose of the presentation, but it was a clear point made in the presentation.

OK, it is marketing to some degree.

But I find it very interesting that Oracle is seemingly going to great lengths to make it easy to work on Linux and Windows. Or maybe it means nothing. But maybe there is a future vision here?

OK, I'm done. Kevin
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