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Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #356826] Sun, 02 November 2008 12:01 Go to next message
dksampat
Messages: 12
Registered: December 2006
Junior Member
Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL?

http://www.greylabyrinth.com/puzzle/puzzle182
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #356827 is a reply to message #356826] Sun, 02 November 2008 12:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michel Cadot
Messages: 64130
Registered: March 2007
Location: Nanterre, France, http://...
Senior Member
Account Moderator
You have to first translate it in SQL model and post a test case, if you want us to try to find an answer.

Regards
Michel
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #356829 is a reply to message #356827] Sun, 02 November 2008 13:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
THis is a good example problem for modeling. This problem reminds me of the craze twenty years ago that delt with building expert systems. It was remarked in more than one paper/book, that it was alway possible to build an expert system using the correct database design, but that relational databases were prehapes not the best implementation vehicle for these types of problems. Maybe that was true maybe not. Maybe relational database flexibility and capabilities have changed sufficiently since then to alter the opiions of those who made these statements.

In then end though puzzles like these still remain as a good way to showcase database design and problem analysis skills.

Your solution must start with a basic examiniation of the problem. You need to articulate two things to begin:

Quote:
1) what are the omponents of the problem.
2) how will you recognize you have a solution.

For exmaple, I would start you off notiing:

Quote:
1) your problem has some number of disks (1 thru 7 in this case)
2) each disk has some number of colors (six on each disk in this case)
3) each disk has the same colors
4) however, the colors are not arranged on each disk in the same location each time (ie.disks are not identical)
5) you have locations to which each disk can be slotted
6) disks can change slots if necessary to yeild a solution
7) colors on the disks can be identified by a name
Cool colors on the disks can be identified by a number
9) colors on the disks can also be identifed on each disk by their relative position to some "absolute zero" (say white)

The above would be a good start on the problem space characteristics. Notice in particular although we can identify each spot on each disk by using (disk,color) or (disk,spot number) or (disk,relative offset), this does not help us in delaring a solution. We must place disks into slots first in order to construct an actual puzzle with the affect such that spots on disks in a puzzle are idetifiable by (slot, color) or (slot, spot number), or (slot, relative offset) given that we know into which slot each disk havs been placed.

The above suggest it is possible to deliniate all possible puzzle variations for any given puzzle in a clear way. Each variation would be disks in specific slots in specific orientations. Each variation cold be checked to see if it meets solution criteria.

This leads us next to define what makes a solution "correct", in terms of the items above. If you can't do that then you are missing something necessary to the problem solution that you have not yet modeled. Might I suggest that a solution would be found where a specific set of spots match a specific set of conditions.

Lastly, in coding an actual SQL solution, you might wish to look at RELATIONAL DIVISION as one possible approach. Understanding the nature of relational division will aid you in understanding what SET problems are about, and the difficulties in solving SET problems. Ulitmately you will find that a relational division solution will be way to slow to be practiical for large problem spaces (and this one might be large), at which point you may wsh to turn to a plsql memory based solution where you use arrays to hold data and do lookups into the arrays to find an answer.

Good luck, Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #356865 is a reply to message #356829] Sun, 02 November 2008 22:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
Don't know about SQL.

But by my reckoning, there are 7 possibilities for choosing the central disk.

Then if we number the remaining positions 1-6, we get:

- For Position 1, there are 6 possibilities for choosing a disk. Since the colour must match the central disk, there is only one rotational possibility.

- For position 2, there are 5 remaining possibilities for choosing a disk. Again, the colour must match the central disk, so there is only 1 rotational possibility.

- etc.

In all, thats 7 x 6 x 5 x 4 x 3 x 2 x 1 = 7! = 5040 possibilities.

That's not exactly heaps. Since a lot of combinations would prove unmatched on the 3rd disk placement, most attempts would take no more than around 1 or 2 seconds, a brute-force manual solution should take you no more than a couple of hours.

I don't reckon I could program it that fast.

Ross Leishman
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357002 is a reply to message #356826] Mon, 03 November 2008 08:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
of course. this is a game after all. Who would play it if it took days and days. Oh wait a minute. I seem to recall the Rubik's Cube. I never got that finished. I remember a contest on TV I saw where 13 year old kids did the cube in seconds. Some guy from Japan did it one handed in 17 seconds (crap).

Rubik's Cube World Records

My favorite, is

Quote:
blindfold, fastest time (time does not include memorising): 23.06 seconds, Clément Gallet (France) at the European Rubik's Cube Championship 2006 in Paris


Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357620 is a reply to message #357002] Thu, 06 November 2008 01:18 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
OK - I detect a challenge. Or maybe I'm being a bit sensitive about it ...
But as an '80s Rubik's Cube geek, I now cannot resist.

First we need some data. I'll define the following TYPE:
create or replace type dp as object (
    disk integer
,   colour varchar2(10)
,   lcolour varchar2(10)
,   rcolour varchar2(10)
)
/

This represents a coloured spot on a disk. If we number the disks in the photo; the middle disk is #1, the top disk (slightly to the right) is #2, and #3 through #7 clockwise from the top.

The tuple (1, 'White','Yellow','Blue') means the WHITE spot on DISK1 (currently in the centre) has a YELLOW spot to its left and a BLUE spot to its right.

We can define all 7 disks as follows:
        SELECT *
        FROM table(dparr(
                dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
        ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')
        ,       dp(1, 'Green','Blue','Red')
        ,       dp(1, 'Red','Green','Black')
        ,       dp(1, 'Black','Red','Yellow')
        ,       dp(1, 'Yellow','Black','White')
        ,       dp(2, 'White','Red','Blue')
        ,       dp(2, 'Blue','White','Black')
        ,       dp(2, 'Black','Blue','Yellow')
        ,       dp(2, 'Yellow','Black','Green')
        ,       dp(2, 'Green','Yellow','Red')
        ,       dp(2, 'Red','Green','White')
        ,       dp(3, 'White','Blue','Red')
        ,       dp(3, 'Red','White','Green')
        ,       dp(3, 'Green','Red','Yellow')
        ,       dp(3, 'Yellow','Green','Black')
        ,       dp(3, 'Black','Yellow','Blue')
        ,       dp(3, 'Blue','Black','White')
        ,       dp(4, 'White','Red','Black')
        ,       dp(4, 'Black','White','Green')
        ,       dp(4, 'Green','Black','Blue')
        ,       dp(4, 'Blue','Green','Yellow')
        ,       dp(4, 'Yellow','Blue','Red')
        ,       dp(4, 'Red','Yellow','White')
        ,       dp(5, 'White','Red','Green')
        ,       dp(5, 'Green','White','Black')
        ,       dp(5, 'Black','Green','Blue')
        ,       dp(5, 'Blue','Black','Yellow')
        ,       dp(5, 'Yellow','Blue','Red')
        ,       dp(5, 'Red','Yellow','White')
        ,       dp(6, 'White','Red','Blue')
        ,       dp(6, 'Blue','White','Yellow')
        ,       dp(6, 'Yellow','Blue','Green')
        ,       dp(6, 'Green','Yellow','Black')
        ,       dp(6, 'Black','Green','Red')
        ,       dp(6, 'Red','Black','White')
        ,       dp(7, 'White','Black','Green')
        ,       dp(7, 'Green','White','Yellow')
        ,       dp(7, 'Yellow','Green','Blue')
        ,       dp(7, 'Blue','Yellow','Red')
        ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
        ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
        ))

      DISK COLOUR     LCOLOUR    RCOLOUR
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
         1 White      Yellow     Blue
         1 Blue       White      Green
         1 Green      Blue       Red
         1 Red        Green      Black
         1 Black      Red        Yellow
         1 Yellow     Black      White
         2 White      Red        Blue
         2 Blue       White      Black
         2 Black      Blue       Yellow
         2 Yellow     Black      Green
         2 Green      Yellow     Red
         2 Red        Green      White
         3 White      Blue       Red
         3 Red        White      Green
         3 Green      Red        Yellow
         3 Yellow     Green      Black
         3 Black      Yellow     Blue
         3 Blue       Black      White
         4 White      Red        Black
         4 Black      White      Green
         4 Green      Black      Blue
         4 Blue       Green      Yellow
         4 Yellow     Blue       Red
         4 Red        Yellow     White
         5 White      Red        Green
         5 Green      White      Black
         5 Black      Green      Blue
         5 Blue       Black      Yellow
         5 Yellow     Blue       Red
         5 Red        Yellow     White
         6 White      Red        Blue
         6 Blue       White      Yellow
         6 Yellow     Blue       Green
         6 Green      Yellow     Black
         6 Black      Green      Red
         6 Red        Black      White
         7 White      Black      Green
         7 Green      White      Yellow
         7 Yellow     Green      Blue
         7 Blue       Yellow     Red
         7 Red        Blue       Black
         7 Black      Red        White

42 rows selected.


Now for the Solution.

We need a starting point: since every disk has every colour, it is fair to say that the SOLUTION will have a white dot on the centre disk (this is true of any colour and any disk, but we have to start somewhere).

So the set of all possible starting points is:
  1  with disks as (
  2          SELECT *
  3          FROM table(dparr(
  4                  dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
  5          ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')

  : : : :

 44          ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
 45          ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
 46          ))
 47  )
 48  SELECT *
 49  FROM   disks d01
 50* where d01.colour = 'White'

      DISK COLOUR     LCOLOUR    RCOLOUR
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
         1 White      Yellow     Blue
         2 White      Red        Blue
         3 White      Blue       Red
         4 White      Red        Black
         5 White      Red        Green
         6 White      Red        Blue
         7 White      Black      Green

7 rows selected.


In this SQL we have only selected the WHITE spot on the middle disk. We are going to need all of the spots for our solution, so lets join them in:
  1  with disks as (
  2     SELECT *
  3     FROM table(dparr(
  4             dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
  5     ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')
  6     ,       dp(1, 'Green','Blue','Red')
  :  :  :  :
 44     ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
 45     ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
 46     ))
 47  )
 48  SELECT d01.disk, d01.colour as spot1, d02.colour as spot2, d03.colour as spot3
 49  ,      d04.colour as spot4, d05.colour as spot5, d06.colour as spot6
 50  FROM   disks d01
 51  JOIN   disks d02 ON d02.colour = d01.rcolour
 52                  AND d02.disk   = d01.disk
 53  JOIN   disks d03 ON d03.colour = d02.rcolour
 54                  AND d03.disk   = d02.disk
 55  JOIN   disks d04 ON d04.colour = d03.rcolour
 56                  AND d04.disk   = d03.disk
 57  JOIN   disks d05 ON d05.colour = d04.rcolour
 58                  AND d05.disk   = d04.disk
 59  JOIN   disks d06 ON d06.colour = d05.rcolour
 60                  AND d06.disk   = d05.disk
 61* where d01.colour = 'White'

      DISK SPOT1      SPOT2      SPOT3      SPOT4      SPOT5      SPOT6
---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
         4 White      Black      Green      Blue       Yellow     Red
         1 White      Blue       Green      Red        Black      Yellow
         2 White      Blue       Black      Yellow     Green      Red
         6 White      Blue       Yellow     Green      Black      Red
         5 White      Green      Black      Blue       Yellow     Red
         7 White      Green      Yellow     Blue       Red        Black
         3 White      Red        Green      Yellow     Black      Blue

7 rows selected.


So that's seven possible choices for the central disk, with the spots listed in clockwise order starting with WHITE.

Now we need to start positioning the other disks. Starting with the WHITE spot on the central disk, we could join any of the 6 remaining disks. In the above SQL, the WHITE spot is represented by the table alias D01 - we want to join all of the spots of matching colour EXCEPT the centre disk, which has already been used:
  1  with disks as (
  2     SELECT *
  3     FROM table(dparr(
  4             dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
  5     ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')

  :  :  :  : 

 44     ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
 45     ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
 46     ))
 47  )
 48  SELECT d01.disk AS CENTRE, d1.disk AS POS1
 49  FROM   disks d01
 50  JOIN   disks d02 ON d02.colour = d01.rcolour
 51                  AND d02.disk   = d01.disk
 52  JOIN   disks d03 ON d03.colour = d02.rcolour
 53                  AND d03.disk   = d02.disk
 54  JOIN   disks d04 ON d04.colour = d03.rcolour
 55                  AND d04.disk   = d03.disk
 56  JOIN   disks d05 ON d05.colour = d04.rcolour
 57                  AND d05.disk   = d04.disk
 58  JOIN   disks d06 ON d06.colour = d05.rcolour
 59                  AND d06.disk   = d05.disk
 60  JOIN   disks d1 ON d1.colour = d01.colour
 61                 AND d1.disk <> d01.disk
 62* where d01.colour = 'White'

    CENTRE       POS1
---------- ----------
         7          4
         7          2
         7          5
         7          1
         7          6
         7          3
         3          1
         3          2
         3          4
         3          7
         3          5
         3          6
         2          7
         2          4
         2          6
         2          3
         2          5
         2          1
         4          3
         4          7
         4          2
         4          1
         4          5
         4          6
         5          6
         5          4
         5          7
         5          3
         5          2
         5          1
         6          5
         6          7
         6          1
         6          4
         6          2
         6          3
         1          6
         1          2
         1          3
         1          7
         1          5
         1          4

42 rows selected.

This means there are 42 (7 x 6) different combinations of centre disk plus another disk that matches the WHITE spot.

Now we join in a third disk. This one has to match the spot to the RIGHT of the WHITE spot on the centre disk AND the colour of the spot to the LEFT of the WHITE spot on the disk at POS1.
  1  with disks as (
  2     SELECT *
  3     FROM table(dparr(
  4             dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
  5     ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')
  6     ,       dp(1, 'Green','Blue','Red')

  :  :  :  :

 44     ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
 45     ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
 46     ))
 47  )
 48  SELECT d01.disk as centre, d1.disk as pos1, d2.disk as pos2
 49  FROM   disks d01
 50  JOIN   disks d02 ON d02.colour = d01.rcolour
 51                  AND d02.disk   = d01.disk
 52  JOIN   disks d03 ON d03.colour = d02.rcolour
 53                  AND d03.disk   = d02.disk
 54  JOIN   disks d04 ON d04.colour = d03.rcolour
 55                  AND d04.disk   = d03.disk
 56  JOIN   disks d05 ON d05.colour = d04.rcolour
 57                  AND d05.disk   = d04.disk
 58  JOIN   disks d06 ON d06.colour = d05.rcolour
 59                  AND d06.disk   = d05.disk
 60  JOIN   disks d1 ON d1.colour = d01.colour
 61                 AND d1.disk <> d01.disk
 62  JOIN   disks d2 ON d2.colour = d02.colour
 63                 AND d2.rcolour = d1.lcolour
 64                 AND d2.disk <> d01.disk
 65                 AND d2.disk <> d1.disk
 66* where d01.colour = 'White'

    CENTRE       POS1       POS2
---------- ---------- ----------
         7          4          1
         7          4          2
         7          6          1
         7          2          1
         7          1          3
         7          5          2
         7          5          1
         7          6          2
         7          3          4
         3          7          1
         2          4          7
         2          1          6
         2          1          4
         2          6          7
         2          1          5
         2          5          7
         4          1          2
         4          5          6
         4          2          6
         4          3          5
         5          4          1
         5          1          7
         5          2          1
         5          4          2
         5          6          1
         5          7          6
         5          1          3
         5          3          4
         5          6          2
         6          1          5
         6          5          7
         6          4          7
         6          2          7
         6          7          2
         6          1          4
         1          6          7
         1          7          2
         1          5          7
         1          2          7
         1          4          7

40 rows selected.

WOW! Now that we have placed 3 disks, we've gone from 42 combinations down to 40 combinations. There are 210 (7x6x5) possible arrangements, but 170 of them FAIL to match the coloured spot to the left of the WHITE one on disk 2.

Now we continue with this approach for POSITIONS 3, 4, and 5. Position 6 (the final position) is special - it must match up to the centre disk, position 5 AND position 1.
  1  with disks as (
  2     SELECT *
  3     FROM table(dparr(
  4             dp(1, 'White','Yellow','Blue')
  5     ,       dp(1, 'Blue','White','Green')
  6     ,       dp(1, 'Green','Blue','Red')
  7     ,       dp(1, 'Red','Green','Black')
  8     ,       dp(1, 'Black','Red','Yellow')
  9     ,       dp(1, 'Yellow','Black','White')
 10     ,       dp(2, 'White','Red','Blue')
 11     ,       dp(2, 'Blue','White','Black')
 12     ,       dp(2, 'Black','Blue','Yellow')
 13     ,       dp(2, 'Yellow','Black','Green')
 14     ,       dp(2, 'Green','Yellow','Red')
 15     ,       dp(2, 'Red','Green','White')
 16     ,       dp(3, 'White','Blue','Red')
 17     ,       dp(3, 'Red','White','Green')
 18     ,       dp(3, 'Green','Red','Yellow')
 19     ,       dp(3, 'Yellow','Green','Black')
 20     ,       dp(3, 'Black','Yellow','Blue')
 21     ,       dp(3, 'Blue','Black','White')
 22     ,       dp(4, 'White','Red','Black')
 23     ,       dp(4, 'Black','White','Green')
 24     ,       dp(4, 'Green','Black','Blue')
 25     ,       dp(4, 'Blue','Green','Yellow')
 26     ,       dp(4, 'Yellow','Blue','Red')
 27     ,       dp(4, 'Red','Yellow','White')
 28     ,       dp(5, 'White','Red','Green')
 29     ,       dp(5, 'Green','White','Black')
 30     ,       dp(5, 'Black','Green','Blue')
 31     ,       dp(5, 'Blue','Black','Yellow')
 32     ,       dp(5, 'Yellow','Blue','Red')
 33     ,       dp(5, 'Red','Yellow','White')
 34     ,       dp(6, 'White','Red','Blue')
 35     ,       dp(6, 'Blue','White','Yellow')
 36     ,       dp(6, 'Yellow','Blue','Green')
 37     ,       dp(6, 'Green','Yellow','Black')
 38     ,       dp(6, 'Black','Green','Red')
 39     ,       dp(6, 'Red','Black','White')
 40     ,       dp(7, 'White','Black','Green')
 41     ,       dp(7, 'Green','White','Yellow')
 42     ,       dp(7, 'Yellow','Green','Blue')
 43     ,       dp(7, 'Blue','Yellow','Red')
 44     ,       dp(7, 'Red','Blue','Black')
 45     ,       dp(7, 'Black','Red','White')
 46     ))
 47  )
 48  SELECT d01.disk, d1.disk, d2.disk, d3.disk, d4.disk, d5.disk, d6.disk
 49  FROM   disks d01
 50  JOIN   disks d02 ON d02.colour = d01.rcolour
 51                  AND d02.disk   = d01.disk
 52  JOIN   disks d03 ON d03.colour = d02.rcolour
 53                  AND d03.disk   = d02.disk
 54  JOIN   disks d04 ON d04.colour = d03.rcolour
 55                  AND d04.disk   = d03.disk
 56  JOIN   disks d05 ON d05.colour = d04.rcolour
 57                  AND d05.disk   = d04.disk
 58  JOIN   disks d06 ON d06.colour = d05.rcolour
 59                  AND d06.disk   = d05.disk
 60  JOIN   disks d1 ON d1.colour = d01.colour
 61                 AND d1.disk <> d01.disk
 62  JOIN   disks d2 ON d2.colour = d02.colour
 63                 AND d2.rcolour = d1.lcolour
 64                 AND d2.disk <> d01.disk
 65                 AND d2.disk <> d1.disk
 66  JOIN   disks d3 ON d3.colour = d03.colour
 67                 AND d3.rcolour = d2.lcolour
 68                 AND d3.disk <> d01.disk
 69                 AND d3.disk <> d1.disk
 70                 AND d3.disk <> d2.disk
 71  JOIN   disks d4 ON d4.colour = d04.colour
 72                 AND d4.rcolour = d3.lcolour
 73                 AND d4.disk <> d01.disk
 74                 AND d4.disk <> d1.disk
 75                 AND d4.disk <> d2.disk
 76                 AND d4.disk <> d3.disk
 77  JOIN   disks d5 ON d5.colour = d05.colour
 78                 AND d5.rcolour = d4.lcolour
 79                 AND d5.disk <> d01.disk
 80                 AND d5.disk <> d1.disk
 81                 AND d5.disk <> d2.disk
 82                 AND d5.disk <> d3.disk
 83                 AND d5.disk <> d4.disk
 84  JOIN   disks d6 ON d6.colour = d06.colour
 85                 AND d6.rcolour = d5.lcolour
 86                 AND d6.lcolour = d1.rcolour
 87                 AND d6.disk <> d01.disk
 88                 AND d6.disk <> d1.disk
 89                 AND d6.disk <> d2.disk
 90                 AND d6.disk <> d3.disk
 91                 AND d6.disk <> d4.disk
 92                 AND d6.disk <> d5.disk
 93* where d01.colour = 'White'

      DISK       DISK       DISK       DISK       DISK       DISK       DISK
---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
         5          6          1          3          4          2          7


There's the solution (I hope). I haven't tested it by printing the picture and cutting out the disks, but I am encouraged by the fact that it returned 1 row.

This is how you would verify the solution.
- Print the picture
- Number the disks in the picture from 1 to 7. 1 is the centre disk, 2-7 are numbered clockwise from the top right.
- Cut out the disks.
- Place disk 5 in the centre - WHITE spot pointing straight UP.
- Place disk 6 at the top with its WHITE spot matching that of disk 5.
- Place disk 1 to the right (clockwise) of disk 6, with the coloured spots matching disks 5 and 6.
- Repeat for disks 3, 4, 2, and 7 working in a clockwise direction

This took me about an hour to do and 40 minutes to write up here. I'm not convinced brute force would have been slower, but it would certainly have been duller.

Ross Leishman
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357745 is a reply to message #357620] Thu, 06 November 2008 07:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
hehehe... I love to watch a thinker in action. I am keeping this one. It has taught me something about analysing problems, woohoo!.

Thanks Ross,

Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357753 is a reply to message #356826] Thu, 06 November 2008 08:16 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
You know, after thinking about this for a few minutes, I feel compeled to speak more.

This is without a doubt, one of the top 10 best posts I have seen on OraFAQ in my seven years of visiting this site. Not because it has some slick code technique, but because it shows clearly how problems are solved in the anlaysis and design phases and not in the coding phase.

You can be the greatest coder in the world, knowing any number of languages expertly and how to use every feature in any of them, but if you can't analyze a problem well, you are doomed.

Indeed, in every problem there is always a critical thought that will help you see the answer, because it has the right perspective, and it usually has something to do with how you see some particular central piece of data. Ross, the key to yours is your use of the three color table. It is the key to what defines a solution, expressed well. This shows how you thought about the problem space way better than I and came up with the perspective on the problem that made for a great solution.

If there is a postings HALL-OF-FAME of POST-OF-THE-DAY area on OraFAQ, then I'd like to see this one go in it. Anybody know? If not, then we maybe the site moderator or someone can figure out how to create and manage one.

Again, this post shows how we make our money in problem analysis and design. Don't go that? Then work on it, or find some other way to pay your bills.

Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357756 is a reply to message #356826] Thu, 06 November 2008 08:18 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
Of course, all this admiration might be moot if it don't really work.

Anyone care to QA it by cutting out some disks, putting colored spots and them and trying the solution?

Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #357828 is a reply to message #357756] Thu, 06 November 2008 18:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
Thanks for the cudos. Geez - I really hope it does work now.
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358036 is a reply to message #357828] Fri, 07 November 2008 19:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
./fa/5262/0/
  • Attachment: DSC_00086.jpg
    (Size: 32.73KB, Downloaded 406 times)
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358038 is a reply to message #358036] Fri, 07 November 2008 19:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kevin Meade
Messages: 2101
Registered: December 1999
Location: Connecticut USA
Senior Member
Ross you make geek cool! Nice job.

Kevin
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358062 is a reply to message #358038] Sat, 08 November 2008 03:02 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Littlefoot
Messages: 20897
Registered: June 2005
Location: Croatia, Europe
Senior Member
Account Moderator
I'm astonished ./fa/5263/0/
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358065 is a reply to message #358062] Sat, 08 November 2008 03:08 Go to previous messageGo to next message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
Littlefoot wrote on Sat, 08 November 2008 20:02
I'm astonished ./fa/5263/0/

So was my wife....; astonished that I have nothing better to do with my time.
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358070 is a reply to message #358065] Sat, 08 November 2008 03:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Littlefoot
Messages: 20897
Registered: June 2005
Location: Croatia, Europe
Senior Member
Account Moderator
No; really, that's outstanding. I've seen really cool solutions, wondering whether they speak Oracle (for example, when I first saw MODEL clause), but THIS one is near to unbelievable :shaking_my_head_in_disbelief:

I think that this is our first multimedial problem solution. Simply wonderful!
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358142 is a reply to message #358036] Sun, 09 November 2008 04:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Frank
Messages: 7880
Registered: March 2000
Senior Member
Did you bake cookies and planted M&M's on them? Now, THAT's what I call geek Smile

btw, I agree with the others about the solution, but we want to keep you down to earth, eh? Wink
Re: Can anyone solve this puzzle using SQL? [message #358163 is a reply to message #358142] Sun, 09 November 2008 19:31 Go to previous message
rleishman
Messages: 3724
Registered: October 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Senior Member
M&M Cookies wouldn't last long enough to take a photo in my house.

My youngest targets them at the cafe and nibbles of the M&Ms, leaving the biscuit. Some are stuck in pretty tight and thwart levering out with tiny fingers. I showed him how to break it in two so that the M&M is now at an edge and can be pecked out with teeth. I got one of those all-too-rare 2YO looks that said 'You legend; I have much to learn.'
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