Blogs

Mohammad taj's picture

Upgrade the Oracle database from 10.1.0.2.0 to 10.1.0.5.0

articles: 

This article describes the process of upgrading the Oracle Database Server 10g Release 10.1.0.2 to Oracle Database 10g Release 10.1.0.5 on Windows XP SP2.

Embed Animated Flash Objects (*.swf file) in Oracle Forms.

articles: 

Hello All,

To embed a Macromedia Flash Object (*.swf File) in Oracle Forms, follow the steps below.

Indexing an Oracle Data Warehouse

articles: 

Oracle-Bashing

Aside from a nine month excursion to Sybase IQ, I've spent my entire career working with Oracle, so I don't profess too much expertise - indeed any! - about other RDBMS technologies. So in a weak attempt at self-education, I recently accepted an invitation to listen to a Teradata presentation directed at application developers.

Kevin Meade's picture

An Introduction to ANYDATA

articles: 

My newest project needed to create a record keeping component that would keep track of balancing results over time. Sounded good, meant my customers could look back over time to see how things went, and it provided persistent evidence of good results. I figured on adding two routines (save/get) to a logging package already in existence to save balancing data via an autonomous transaction and retrieve it when needed. But in writing these routines it dawned on me that they would destroy the reusable nature of the logging package. Finally, a real life use for ANYDATA.

Pankaj Chandiramani's picture

Simulating ASM with 10g Database by faking the hardware

articles: 

Caution: This method is for Testing & Learning purposes only.

Most of the Oracle 10g databases are using ASM for storage as it's very simple to maintain the storage w.r.t. to Disks, Datafiles etc.

saibal's picture

Flashback Database: A Primer

articles: 

Introduction

Oracle 10g’s brilliant alternative to database point in time recovery is the the Flashback Database feature. With this feature in place you can do almost everything that you can with point in time recovery, without actually having to go through all the disruptions and hassle that a PITR necessarily entails.I recently had a first hand opportunity to see the power of this feature, when I ran a scriptfile to drop tables and unwittingly dropped one of the tables containing sensitive information belonging to my employer Creative Infotech. I later recovered the table and was amazed at seeing how easy it had become to get back dropped objects in Oracle 10g, especially Release 2. Below is a simplified version of what I did

saibal's picture

Failover and Load balancing in Oracle

articles: 

Advanced features of Oracle Net include failover and load balancing. These features are actually interrelated in as much as you usually don’t have one without the other. While they are mostly used in a RAC environment, they can be set up in a single instance environment as well.

FAILOVER:
In the context of Oracle Net, failover refers to the mechanism of switching over to an alternate resource when connection to the primary resource gets terminated due to any reason. Connection failure may be broadly categorized as:

SQL Tuning made easy in Oracle 10g

articles: 

“Find out how to use DBMS_SQLTUNE package to tune SQL Statements in Oracle 10g”

Have you ever been frustrated with SQL Tuning?
Did you get lost in the maze of /+ HINTS +/ and analysis paralysis?
Pre-10g you have to be either a SQL tuning expert or should have a license to expensive tuning tools available in the market to effectively tune SQL Statements. Not the case anymore.

In 10g you can use DBMS_SQLTUNE package to get tuning recommendations for SQL Statements.

Overview

Tuning of SQL Statements using DBMS_SQLTUNE involves following 4 steps:

Dynamic creation of procedures in PL/SQL

articles: 

Every PL/SQl devloper must have tried their hands with dynamic SQl. Its an indelible part of oracle.But its generally used when we dont know at compile time about the object on which we are to perform the task. Suppose we want to insert data into a table but we get the name of the table during the execution of the procedure, in those cases we would use dynamic SQl with the table name passed as bind variable. Dynamic Sql is even used to execute DDl commands inside a PL/SQl block.

Kevin Meade's picture

Point in Time (Nearest Neighbor Algorithms for SQL)

articles: 

Been doing a lot with Historical Perspective lately. This has caused me to think a bit about the different variations of lookup that can be called a Point In Time query. My customers have found this discussion useful in understanding the details of how their report programs find specific rows in time. It is helpful to them because it provides an understanding as to why a specific row shows up on a report, and thus allows them to create more exacting definitions of what they want. Plus I find it is a good primer for newbies on staff to read so they don't make the same mistakes we made when we first started doing PIT queries. Maybe you can use it too.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs