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Oracle Menu - a very useful shell script

Hi there,

I have never joined an Oracle forum before so hello.

I have just spent the last 9 years of my life working for Oracle Consulting UK. I am now contracting in the Cayman Islands.

I spent a lot of time writing a shell script and wondered if you'd like to see it. it really can save you a lot of time and is a nice cockpit to navigate around in.

works great for no database, core, or 11i (eBus)

tell me what you think:

http://www.oracle.me.uk

it only runs on unix (ksh) or bash with a very simple documented mod. I even coded it around pdksh's bugs (rightmost pipe not in current process).

Securing Your Database: A simple Brute Force Blocker

Natalka Roshak's picture

If you've had to change a Unix password, you know that most systems won't let you use just anything as a password - your password must be a minimum length, and must not be too easy to guess or brute-force. Oracle doesn't come with this capability installed out of the box, but Oracle 8 and above let DBAs define a custom function to complexity-check user passwords. Oracle provides a default password verification function to do some basic checking, although DBAs need to know about it and install it manually.

Easy XML - Let the Database do the Work

Kevin Meade's picture

I don’t want to learn XML. I don’t want to learn XPATH. I don’t want to learn XQUERY. I don’t want to learn XSLT. I don’t want to learn XSQL. I don’t want to learn XSU. XDB has some way cool stuff. But to-date, I have been pretty successful in not learning things I don’t want to learn. So you might think that when the time came for my databases to start sharing data via a XML transport, I would be in trouble. Fortunately, God gave me at least a few smarts when he loaded me up with laziness. In this article we will discuss one way to move XML formatted data in and out of Oracle using what we already know: object views, instead of triggers, collections, and PL/SQL packages.

What a strange way to write NULL

gojko's picture

A few days ago, while hunting for a bug in PL/SQL code, I stumbled upon the strangest way to write NULL. If the e-mail address parameter was empty, the genius who wrote this PL/SQL procedure set it to , then compared it with ten lines below, in order to log a problem. I really don't know what is it about NULL that scares people so much, but over the years I got used to occasional -1 and 0, or even 'EMPTY'. However, this is the first time I ran across Donald.

The Phoenix Rises: a How-To for SQL FROM SQL

Kevin Meade's picture

If I had to recommend THE one most exploitable skill to have for an Oracle Developer or DBA, it would have to be HOW TO PLAY GOLF. I have observed few other talents give regular Mary and Joe, greater access to people from all levels of the corporate world. You will meet everyone from the janitor, to management elite without the fear or intimidation that we sometimes feel in these circles. For some reason, on the fairway all are equal; the only things that matter are your swing and your handicap. Alas, I never learned to play golf, so I must settle for imparting an actual job skill. And for that, my best first choice would be SQL FROM SQL.

A better view

gojko's picture

Accessing the database from the outside world basically comes down to two options - direct querying or executing stored procedures. Procedural access is often chosen for the wrong reasons - making maintenance significantly harder.

10gR2 new feature: Case Insensitive Sorts & Compares

Natalka Roshak's picture

One handy new feature of 10gR2 is its vastly expanded ability to do case-insensitive sorts and compares (a subset of its expanded ability with other special sorts and compares, such as special linguistic sorts).

Best practice to corrupt data

gojko's picture

A common practice for handling errors in PL/SQL procedures is to catch all errors in the top-most database layer and convert them into error codes and human readable messages for client applications. This technique is a relict from the past and, in fact, a very bad practice from today's perspective, since it can lead to data corruption.

Display REFCURSOR results through SQL*Plus

Kevin Meade's picture

Recently a friend asked me a simple question; "How do I display the results of a REFCURSOR through SQL*Plus?". The answer is of course is just as simple as the question, you "SELECT" it like anything else. He just had not seen the syntax before. Being me though, I wouldn't let him get away with such an easy offing, so I sent him instead a quick write-up on REFCURSORS and, the just as interesting, CURSOR EXPRESSIONS. This write-up shows various coding samples of how to use these to great effect. He liked it. He said it should be written up somewhere, and I knew just where. Hope you like it too. If you do, please add something in a reply, especially if you have a better or unique or interesting way of exploiting these features. I'd like to read about it, maybe even steal your code...

Using Oracle's recycle bin

Natalka Roshak's picture

One of the many new features that Oracle 10g introduced is the recyclebin. When enabled, this feature works a little bit like the familiar Windows recycle bin or Mac Trash. Dropped tables go "into" the recyclebin, and can be restored from the recyclebin. OraFAQ has already published an article covering the basics; in this article, I'll cover some of the more subtle aspects of the recyclebin.