Feed aggregator

DAM tools, IBM Guardium, Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and SAP

A question we have answered a few times in the last few months is whether or not, and if so, how easy do Database Activity Monitoring (DAM) tools such as IBM Guardium support ERP platforms such as the Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and SAP. The answer is yes; DAM tools can support ERP systems. For example, IBM Guardium has out-of-the-box policies for both the E-Business Suite and SAP – see figures one and two below.

There are many advantages to deploying a DAM solution to protect your ERP platform, the first being additional defense-in-depth for one of your most critical assets. You can read more here ( Integrigy Guide to Auditing and Logging in Oracle E-Business Suite)  about Integrigy’s recommendations for database security programs. DAM solutions allow for complex reporting as well as 24x7 monitoring and easy relaying of alerts to your SIEM (e.g. Splunk or ArcSight).

Deploying DAM solutions to protect your SAP, PeopleSoft or E-Business Suite is a not-plug-and-play exercise. IBM Guardium’s out-of-the-box policies for the E-Business Suite require configuration to be of any value – see figure three below. The out-of-the-box DAM policies are a good starting point and Integrigy rarely sees them implemented as is. Integrigy also highly recommends, if at all possible, to complete a sensitive data discovery project prior to designing your initial DAM policies. Such projects greatly help to define requirements as well as offer opportunities for data clean up.

Overall, to design and implement an initial set of Guardium policies for the E-Business Suite (or any other ERP package) is usually a few weeks of effort depending on your size and complexity.

If you have any questions, please contact us at info@integrigy.com

Figure 1- Seeded Guardium Policies for EBS and SAP

Figure 2- Guardium E-Business Suite PCI Policy

Figure 3- Example of Blank Configuration

 

 

 

Auditing, Oracle E-Business Suite, IBM Guardium
Categories: APPS Blogs, Security Blogs

PeopleTools Mobile Book Now Shipping

Jim Marion - Wed, 2015-09-30 10:02

I received notice yesterday that our latest book, PeopleSoft PeopleTools: Mobile Applications Development (Oracle Press) 1st Edition, is now shipping. Probably the most exciting news is that Amazon has the book listed as the #1 New Release in the Oracle Databases category.

delete all data

Laurent Schneider - Tue, 2015-09-29 09:53

How do you delete all data? The simplistic approach would be to truncate all tables


SQL> select table_name from user_tables;
TABLE_NAME
----------
T1
SQL> truncate table t1;
Table truncated.

You cannot truncate if you have referential integrity constraints.


SQL> truncate table t2;
ORA-02266: unique/primary keys in table 
  referenced by enabled foreign keys

Ok, let’s disable the RIC


SQL> select table_name, constraint_name
  from user_constraints
  where constraint_type='R';
TAB CONSTRAINT
--- ----------
T3  SYS_C00107
SQL> alter table t3 disable constraint SYS_C00107;
Table altered.
SQL> truncate table t2;
Table truncated.
SQL> truncate table t3;
Table truncated.

You cannot truncate cluster tables


SQL> truncate table t4;
ORA-03292: Table to be truncated is part of a cluster

Cluster tables could be dropped with TRUNCATE CLUSTER.


SQL> select cluster_name from user_clusters;
CLUSTER_NAME                  
------------
C                             
SQL> truncate cluster c;
Cluster truncated.

The code above doesn’t work with Partitioned cluster (12.1.0.2) because it was not properly implemented at the time of the writing.
Check Bug 20284579 : CAN NOT QUERY DYNAMIC CLUSTER PARTITIONS

For reference partitioning, it is not possible to disable the foreign key


SQL> alter table t6 disable constraint fk;
ORA-14650: operation not supported for 
  reference-partitioned tables

In 12c, if the foreign key is defined with ON DELETE CASCADE, you can truncate cascade the parent.


SQL> select table_name, REF_PTN_CONSTRAINT_NAME
  from user_part_tables 
  where partitioning_type='REFERENCE';
TAB REF
--- ---
T6  FK 
SQL> select r_constraint_name, delete_rule 
  from user_constraints 
  where constraint_name='FK';
R_CON DELETE_RULE
----- -----------
PK    CASCADE    
SQL> select table_name
  from user_constraints 
  where constraint_name='PK';
TAB
---
T5 
SQL> truncate table t5 cascade;
Table truncated.

But if one of child or child-child table is using reference partitioning without the ON DELETE CASCADE, then the parent or grand-parent could not be truncated. And truncate cascade for reference partitioning is not documented (yet).

But there is very nice alternative to TRUNCATE called is DELETE 🙂


SQL> select table_name, REF_PTN_CONSTRAINT_NAME
  from user_part_tables 
  where partitioning_type='REFERENCE';
TAB REF
--- ---
T8  FK 
SQL> select r_constraint_name, delete_rule 
  from user_constraints 
  where constraint_name='FK';
R_CON DELETE_RULE
----- -----------
PK    NO ACTION  
SQL> select table_name
from user_constraints 
where constraint_name='PK'
TAB
---
T7 
SQL> truncate table t7 cascade;
ORA-14705: unique or primary keys referenced by enabled foreign keys in table "SCOTT"."T8"
SQL> truncate table t8;
Table truncated.
SQL> delete from t7;
2 rows deleted

To get the tables in the right order, parent tables after children, you can do some hierarchical query and then order by rownum desc, a construct I’m using for the first time I confess. Note the leaf tables are truncable.


select c_owner owner, child table_name   
FROM 
  (
    SELECT 
      p_OWNER, parent, nvl(c_owner, a.owner) c_owner,
      nvl(child, a.table_name ) child
    FROM 
    (
      SELECT 
        PT.OWNER P_owner, pt.table_name parent, 
        pt2.owner c_owner, pt2.table_name child
      FROM all_part_tables pt
      JOIN all_constraints c
      ON pt.OWNER = c.owner
        AND PT.TABLE_NAME = c.table_name
        AND c.constraint_type = 'P'
        AND c.status = 'ENABLED'
      JOIN all_constraints r
      ON r.r_owner = c.owner
        AND r.r_constraint_name = c.constraint_name
        AND r.constraint_type = 'R'
        AND r.status = 'ENABLED'
      JOIN all_part_tables pt2
      ON r.owner = pt2.owner
        AND r.constraint_name = pt2.REF_PTN_CONSTRAINT_NAME
        AND pt2.partitioning_type = 'REFERENCE'
    ) t
    RIGHT JOIN all_tables a 
    ON child = table_name and a.owner = T.c_OWNER
  )
where connect_by_isleaf=0  
CONNECT BY parent = PRIOR child and p_owner=PRIOR c_owner
start with parent is null 
order by rownum desc;

OWNER TAB
----- ---
SCOTT T10 
SCOTT T9

Note the query above is very slow. If dictionary-performance is an issue, maybe we could delete all tables and catch exceptions and loop until all tables are empty


SQL> delete from t9;
ORA-02292: integrity constraint (SCOTT.F10) violated - child record found
SQL> delete from t10;
ORA-02292: integrity constraint (SCOTT.F11) violated - child record found
SQL> delete from t11;
1 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t9;
ORA-02292: integrity constraint (SCOTT.F10) violated - child record found
SQL> delete from t10;
1 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t11;
0 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t9;
1 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t10;
0 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t11;
0 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t9;
0 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t10;
0 row deleted.
SQL> delete from t11;
0 row deleted.

If you have close to zero reference-partitioning table, this approach will be more efficient.

Column Group Headings in an Interactive Report (APEX 5.0)

Dimitri Gielis - Tue, 2015-09-29 06:12
In 2008 I blogged about how to add Group Headings into an Interactive Report in Oracle Application Express (APEX 3.x!).

Here's an example what I mean with Group Headings, you want to logically group certain columns (e.g. Empno, Ename) and have a group name above them (e.g. Group 1):


The approach I used at that time worked, but it required a lot of manual work. In 2009 Martin D'Souza improved it and wrote a blog post about that. In 2010, when plugins were introduced in APEX 4, Martin wrapped it all in a nice APEX plugin which made adding Column Group Headings almost declarative. The plugin was further improved and put on GitHub.

Today, having APEX 5, and the Interactive Reports being changed a lot behind the scenes, the plugin was broken. As we're in the middle of restructuring how to share code, plugins etc., I forked Martin's git repo and made the plugin compatible with APEX 5 and Universal Theme (see version 1.0.4), so when you need it, you can grap it from the forked repo. At a later time the plugin will be moved to OraOpenSource, so depending when you read this post, check out OraOpenSource as Martin, I and many other developers will start putting our open source code on OraOpenSource.

Here's a quick how to use the plugin.

Step 1: Download the file dynamic_action_plugin_com_clarifit_apexplugin_ir_column_grouping.sql
Step 2: Import the plugin in your APEX application
Step 3: Define the Groups in the Interactive Report (you can right click on Column Groups in the  Attributes of your Interactive Report and add the Groups you need):


Step 4: Assign the group to the columns of your report (you can multi select the columns and in the right pane you can select the group):


Important: define for every column that has a group defined, a static id equal to the name of the column (e.g. ENAME).

Step 5: Add the dynamic action plugin to the page
When:
- Event: After Refresh
- Selection Type: Region
- Region:
Action:
- IR Column Grouping [Plug-In]



That's it... note that when you scroll down and you have sticky headers, the group will stay with it.


Categories: Development

Lot's Wife

Greg Pavlik - Mon, 2015-09-28 11:57
Lot's Wife
by Anna Akhmatova
an interpretive translation by Greg Pavlik
The righteous Lot heard the voice of God
As if coming from the distant and black mountains.
But his wife,
She saw what was until yesterday her blessing.
Under the beautiful spires of Sodom,
Where she sang spinning cloth -
The empty window of the room,
In which her children were born.
She looked – and her pain died with her,
For she could look no more:
Her body translucent salt,
Her feet joined the earth.
Who will mourn for Marah?
An insignificant role in a grand saga -
Yet my conscience cannot forget
The one who gave her life for a fleeting glance.
-----
Original poem
И праведник шел за посланником Бога,
Огромный и светлый, по черной горе.
Но громко жене говорила тревога:
Не поздно, ты можешь еще посмотреть
На красные башни родного Содома,
На площадь, где пела, на двор, где пряла,
На окна пустые высокого дома,
Где милому мужу детей родила.
Взглянула – и, скованы смертною болью,
Глаза ее больше смотреть не могли;
И сделалось тело прозрачною солью,
И быстрые ноги к земле приросли.
Кто женщину эту оплакивать будет?
Не меньшей ли мнится она из утрат?
Лишь сердце мое никогда не забудет
Отдавшую жизнь за единственный взгляд.

Custom image on your APEX app login page

Dimitri Gielis - Sun, 2015-09-27 16:15
In a comment on my post APEX 5.0: pimping the Login page I got a question how to put your own logo or a custom image on the login page, instead of an icon.

You only need a bit of CSS to do the trick:

You can add the above CSS to your login page - Inline CSS in page attributes or you can add it to your page template or custom CSS in Universal Theme.

The result is this:


To differentiate the login page you can do a lot more, here're some things we show during our APEX UI training:

  • add transparency to the login box
  • add a background image to your entire page (blurred or not)
Again, you can do that with just some CSS.
Categories: Development

My sessions recommendations for JavaOne '15 and OOW '15

Kuassi Mensah - Sun, 2015-09-27 14:52
JavaOne SF 2015  Session recommendations

High Availability with Java EE Containers, JDBC, and Java Connection Pools [BOF7732]
Monday, Oct 26, 8:00 p.m. | Parc 55—Mission

Implement Cloud Data Services with Java 8 Nashorn [CON4405]

Java Connection Pool Performance and Scalability with Wait-Free Programming [CON2158]
Wednesday, Oct 28, 4:30 p.m. | Hilton—Continental Ballroom 1/2/3


OOW SF 2015 - Session recommendations

Java Virtual Machine Cookbook [UGF2720]
Sunday, Oct 25, 9:00 a.m. | Moscone West—3011


Next-Generation Database: Implement Cloud Data Services with Java 8 Nashorn [CON8461]
Monday, Oct 26, 5:15 p.m. | Moscone South—308

Next-Generation Database: Java Connection Pool for Multitenant and Sharded Databases [CON8460]
Monday, Oct 26, 2:45 p.m. | Moscone South—308


Integrate Master Data with Big Data on Hadoop and Spark [CON8459]
Wednesday, Oct 28, 3:00 p.m. | Moscone South—308

Market Basket Analysis Using Oracle In-Database Container for Hadoop [CON8462]
Thursday, Oct 29, 12:00 p.m. | Moscone South—307

Next-Gen Database Enhancements for Java Application Performance and Scalability [CON10310]
Thursday, Oct 29, 2:30 p.m. | Moscone South—307


Dialog with the Oracle Database Java Developers and Architects [MTE9501]
Tuesday, Oct 27, 7:15 p.m. | Moscone South—305



Creepy Dolls - A Technology and Privacy Nightmare!

Abhinav Agarwal - Sat, 2015-09-26 11:28
This post was first published on LinkedIn on 20th May, 2015.

"Hi, I'm Chucky. Wanna play?"[1]  Fans of the horror film genre will surely recall these lines - innocent-sounding on their own, yet bone-chilling in the context of the scene in the movie - that Chucky, the possessed demonic doll, utters in the cult classic, "Child's Play". Called a "cheerfully energetic horror film" by Roger Ebert [2], the movie was released to more than a thousand screens on its debut in November 1988 [3]. It went on to spawn at least five sequels and developed a cult following of sorts over the next two decades [4].

Chucky the doll
(image credit: http://www.shocktillyoudrop.com/)In "Child's Play", Chucky the killer doll stays quiet around the adults - at least initially - but carries on secret conversations with Andy, and is persuasive enough to convince him to skip school and travel to downtown Chicago. Chucky understands how children think, and can evidently manipulate - or convince, depending on how you frame it - Andy into doing little favours for him. A doll that could speak, hear, see, understand, and have a conversation with a human in the eighties was the stuff out of science fiction, or in the case of "Child's Play" - out of a horror movie.

Edison Talking Doll.
Image credit: www.davescooltoys.comA realistic doll that could talk and converse was for long the "holy grail" of dollmakers [5]. It will come as a huge surprise to many - at least it did to me - that within a few years of the invention of the phonograph by Thomas Edison in 1877, a doll with a pre-recorded voice had been developed and marketed in 1890! It didn't have a very happy debut however. After "several years of experimentation and development", the Edison Talking Doll, when it launched in 1890, "was a dismal failure that was only marketed for a few short weeks."[6] Talking dolls seem to have made their entry into mainstream retail only with the advent of "Chatty Cathy" - released by Mattel in the 1960s - and which worked on a simple pull-string mechanism. The quest to make these dolls more interactive and more "intelligent" continued; "Amazing Amanda" was another milestone in this development; it incorporated "voice-recognition and memory chips, sensory technology and facial animatronics" [7]. It was touted as an "an evolutionary leap from earlier talking dolls like Chatty Cathy of the 1960's" by some analysts [8]. In some ways that assessment was not off-the-mark. After all, "Amazing Amanda" utilized RFID technology - among the hottest technology buzzwords a decade back. "Radio-frequency tags in Amanda's accessories - including toy food, potty and clothing - wirelessly inform the doll of what it is interacting with." This is what enabled "Amazing Amanda" to differentiate between "food" (pizza, or "cookies, pancakes and spaghetti") and "juice"[9]. "However, even with all these developments and capabilities, the universe of what these toys could was severely limited. At most they could recognize the voice of the child as its "mommy".
Amazing Amanda doll.
Image credit:amazing-amanda.fuzzup.netThey were constrained by both the high price of storage (Flash storage is much sturdier than spinning hard drives, but an order of magnitude costlier; this limits the amount of storage possible) and limited computational capability (putting in a high-end microprocessor inside every doll would make them prohibitively expensive). The flip side was that what the toys spoke in home to the children stayed at home. These toys had a limited set of pre-programmed sentences and emotions they could convey, and if you wanted something different, you went out and bought a new toy, or in some cases, a different cartridge.

That's where things stood. Till now.

Screenshot of ToyFair websiteBetween February 14-17, 2015, the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York saw "the Western Hemisphere’s largest and most important toy show"[10] - the 2015 Toy Fair. This was a trade-show, which meant that "Toy Fair is not open to the public. NO ONE under the age of 18, including infants, will be admitted."[11] It featured a "record-breaking 422,000+ net square feet of exhibit space"[12] and hundreds of thousands of toys. Yet no children were allowed. Be that as it may, there was no dearth of, let's say, "innovative" toys. Apart from an "ultra creepy mechanical doll, complete with dead eyes", a fake fish pet that taken to a "whole new level of weird", or a "Doo Doo Head" doll that had the shape of you-guessed-it [13], of particular interest was a "Hello Barbie" doll, launched by the Fortune 500 behemoth, Mattel. This doll had several USPs to its credit. It featured voice-recognition software, voice recording capabilities, the ability to upload recorded conversations to a server (presumably Mattel's or ToyTalk's) in the cloud, over "Wi-Fi" - as a representative at the exhibition took pains to emphasize, repeatedly - and give "chatty responses."[14] This voice data would be processed and analyzed by the company's servers. The doll would learn the child's interests, and be able to carry on a conversation on those topics - made possible by the fact that the entire computational and learning capabilities of a server farm in the cloud could be accessed by every such toy. That the Barbie franchise is a vital one to Mattel could not be understated. The Barbie brand netted Mattel $1.2 billion in FY 2013 [15], but this represented a six per cent year-on-year decline. Mattel attributed that this decline in Barbie sales in part to "product innovation not being strong enough to drive growth." The message was clear. Something very "innovative" was needed to jump-start sales. To make that technological leap forward, Mattel decided to team up with ToyTalk.

ToyTalk is a San Francisco-based start-up, and its platform powered the voice-recognition software used by "Hello Barbie". ToyTalk is headed by "CEO Oren Jacob, Pixar's former CTO, who worked at the groundbreaking animation company for 20 years" [16], and which claimed "$31M in funding from Greylock Partners, Charles River Ventures, Khosla Ventures, True Ventures and First Round Capital as well as a number of angel investors." [17]

Cover of Misery, by Stephen King.
Published by Viking Press.The voice recognition software would allow Mattel and ToyTalk to learn the preferences of the child, and over time refine the responses that Barbie would communicate back. As the Mattel representative put it, "She's going to get to know all my likes and all my dislikes..."[18] - a statement that at one level reminds one of Annie Wilkes when she says, "I'm your number one fan."[19] We certainly don't want to be in Paul Sheldon shoes.

Hello Barbie's learning would start happening from the time the doll was switched on and connected to a Wi-Fi network. ToyTalk CEO Oren Jacob said, "we'll see week one what kids want to talk about or not" [20]. These recordings, once uploaded to the company's servers, would be used by "ToyTalk's speech recognition platform, currently powering the company's own interactive iPad apps including The Winston Show, SpeakaLegend, and SpeakaZoo" and which then "allows writers to create branching dialogue based on what children will potentially actually say, and collects kids' replies in the cloud for the writers to study and use in an evolving environment of topics and responses."[20]. Some unknown set of people. sitting in some unknown location, would potentially get to hear and listen to entire conversations of a child before his parents would.

If Mattel or ToyTalk did not anticipate the reaction this doll would generate, one can only put it down to the blissful disconnect from the real-world that Silicon Valley entrepreneurs often develop, surrounded as they are by similar-thinking digerati. In any case, the responses were swift, and in most cases brutal. The German magazine "Stern" headlined an article on the doll - "Mattel entwickelt die Stasi-Barbie" [21] Even without the benefit of translation, the word "Stasi" stood out like a red flag. In any case, if you wondered, the headline translated to "Mattel developed the Stasi Barbie" [22]. Stern "curtly re-baptised" it "Barbie IM". "The initials stand for “Inoffizieller Mitarbeiter”, informants who worked for East Germany’s infamous secret police, the Stasi, during the Cold War." [23] [24]. A Newsweek article carried a story, "Privacy Advocates Call Talking Barbie 'Surveillance Barbie'"[25]. France 24 wrote - "Germans balk at new ‘Soviet snitch’ Barbie" [26]. The ever-acerbic The Register digged into ToyTalk's privacy policy on the company's web site, and found these gems out [27]:
Screenshot of ToyTalk's Privacy page- "When users interact with ToyTalk, we may capture photographs or audio or video recordings (the "Recordings") of such interactions, depending upon the particular application being used.
- We may use, transcribe and store such Recordings to provide and maintain the Service, to develop, test or improve speech recognition technology and artificial intelligence algorithms, and for other research and development or internal purposes."

Further reading revealed that what your child spoke to the doll in the confines of his home in, say, suburban Troy Michigan, could end up travelling half the way across the world, to be stored on a server in a foreign country - "We may store and process personal information in the United States and other countries." [28]

What information would ToyTalk share with "Third Parties" was equally disturbing, both for the amount of information that could potentially be shared as well as for the vagueness in defining who these third-parties could possibly be - "Personal information"; "in an aggregated or anonymized form that does not directly identify you or others;"; "in connection with, or during negotiations of, any merger, sale of company assets, financing or acquisition, or in any other situation where personal information may be disclosed or transferred as one of the business assets of ToyTalk"; "We may also share feature extracted data and transcripts that are created from such Recordings, but from which any personal information has been removed, with Service Providers or other third parties for their use in developing, testing and improving speech recognition technology and artificial intelligence algorithms and for research and development or other purposes."[28] A child's speech, words, conversation, voice - as recorded by the doll - was the "business asset" of the company.

And lest the reader have any concerns about safety and security of the data on the company's servers, the following disclaimer put paid to any reassurances on that front also: "no security measures are perfect or impenetrable and no method of data transmission that can be guaranteed against any interception or other type of misuse."[28] If the sound of hands being washed-off could be put down on paper, that sentence above is what it could conceivably look like.

Apart from the firestorm of criticism described above, the advocacy group "Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood" started a campaign to petition Mattel "CEO Christopher Sinclair to stop "Hello Barbie" immediately." [29]

The brouhaha over "Hello Barbie" is however only symptomatic of several larger issues that have emerged and intersect each other in varying degrees, raising important questions about technology, including the cloud, big data, the Internet of Things, data mining, analytics; privacy in an increasingly digital world; advertising and the ethics of marketing to children; law and how it is able to or unable to cope with an increasingly digitized society; and the impact on children and teens - sociological as well as psychological. Technology and Moore's Law [30] have combined with the convenience of broadband to make possible what would have been in the realm of science fiction even two decades ago.

The Internet, while opening up untold avenues of betterment for society at large, has however also revealed itself as not without a dark side - a dilemma universally common to almost every transformative change in society. From the possibly alienating effects of excessive addiction to the Internet to physiological changes that the very nature of the hyperlinked web engenders in humans - these are issues that are only recently beginning to attract the attention of academics and researchers. The basic and most fundamental notions of what people commonly understood as "privacy" are not only being challenged in today's digital world, but in most cases without even a modicum of understanding on the part of the affected party - you. In the nebulous space that hopefully still exists between those who believe in technology as the only solution capable of delivering a digital nirvana to all and every imaginable problem in society on the one hand and the Luddites who see every bit of technology as a rabid byte (that's a bad pun) against humanity lies a saner middle ground that seeks to understand and adapt technology for the betterment of humanity, society, and the world at large.

So what happened to Chucky? Well, as we know, it spawned a successful and profitable franchise of sequels and other assorted franchise. Which direction "Hello Barbie" takes is of less interest to me as the broader questions I raised in the previous paragraph.

References:
[1] http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0094862/quotes?item=qt0289926 
[2] "Child's Play" review, http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/childs-play-1988
[3] http://www.the-numbers.com/movie/Childs-Play#tab=box-office
[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child%27s_Play_%28franchise%29
[5] "A Brief History of Talking Dolls--From Bebe Phonographe to Amazing Amanda", http://collectdolls.about.com/od/dollsbymaterial/a/talkingdolls.htm
[6] "Edison Talking Doll", http://www.edisontinfoil.com/doll.htm
[7] http://www.canada.com/story.html?id=f4370a3c-903d-4728-a9a4-3d3f941055a6
[8] http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/25/technology/circuits/25doll.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
[9] http://www.canada.com/story.html?id=f4370a3c-903d-4728-a9a4-3d3f941055a6
[10] http://www.toyfairny.com/toyfair/Toy_Fair/Show_Info/A_Look_Back.aspx
[11] http://www.toyfairny.com/ToyFair/ShowInfo/About_the_Show/Toy_Fair/Show_Info/About_the_Show.aspx
[12] http://www.toyfairny.com/ToyFair/ShowInfo/About_the_Show/Toy_Fair/Show_Info/About_the_Show.aspx
[13] http://mashable.com/2015/02/15/weird-toys-2015-toy-fair/
[14] https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=RJMvmVCwoNM
[15] http://corporate.mattel.com/PDFs/2013_AR_Report_Mattel%20Inc.pdf
[16] http://www.fastcompany.com/3042430/most-creative-people/using-toytalk-technology-new-hello-barbie-will-have-real-conversations-
[17] https://www.toytalk.com/about/
[18] https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=RJMvmVCwoNM
[19] http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100157/quotes?item=qt0269492
[20] http://www.fastcompany.com/3042430/most-creative-people/using-toytalk-technology-new-hello-barbie-will-have-real-conversations-
[21] http://www.stern.de/digital/ueberwachung/barbie-wird-zum-spion-im-kinderzimmer-2173997.html
[22] https://translate.google.co.in/?ie=UTF-8&hl=en&client=tw-ob#auto/en/Mattel%20entwickelt%20die%20Stasi-Barbie
[23] http://www.france24.com/en/20150224-hello-barbie-germany-stasi-data-collection/
[24] http://www.stern.de/digital/ueberwachung/barbie-wird-zum-spion-im-kinderzimmer-2173997.html
[25] http://www.newsweek.com/privacy-advocates-want-take-wifi-connected-hello-barbie-offline-313432
[26] http://www.france24.com/en/20150224-hello-barbie-germany-stasi-data-collection/
[27] http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/02/19/hello_barbie/
[28] https://www.toytalk.com/legal/privacy/
[29] http://org.salsalabs.com/o/621/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=17347
[30] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore's_law


Disclaimer: Views expressed are personal.


© 2015, Abhinav Agarwal. All rights reserved.

Know What Ya Got

Floyd Teter - Fri, 2015-09-25 15:34
There are two extremely bad decisions commonly made with enterprise software, and I see both take place every day.

This doesn't work the way we expect.  File a bug.
Over the years, my own experience tells me that two-thirds of bugs filed aren't really bugs.  What we really have is a user who fails to understand how the software works.  And, yes, we can always respond with RTM (or worse), but the stream of bugs that aren't bugs continues to be filed.  Stop for a second and imagine all the software development productivity lost in addressing bugs that aren't bugs.  And we wonder why it takes so long to introduce new releases and features?

This doesn't work the way we expect.  We'll have to customize the software.

We're not talking about extensions or bolt-ons.  We're talking about changing the code delivered out of the box.  Seems like around 75 percent of Oracle enterprise applications customers customize delivered code in one way or another.  SaaS will cut this number way down, but it's still widely prevalent throughout the installed customer base of Oracle enterprise applications.

Why is customization bad?  First, it means a customer must have a team of developers to build and maintain the customization through it's lifecycle.  It's that maintenance part that gets really costly...each new update, each new release, each new expansion require testing and likely some change to the customized code.  And here comes the incredibly crazy part of customization:  I would confidently bet my lungs against yours that over two-thirds of those customizations are unnecessary to accomplish the purposes of the customer.  Because the software out of the box already has the functionality to achieve business goal in mind...but it's likely a new way of doing things, and many folks don't want to change.  Even when the change might be better.  So we customize the code.

What to do?

As a very young man, I spent some time as a Boy Scout.   I was a really lousy Boy Scout.  Nothing that I liked about the entire thing.  Later on, after I grew up, I developed a great appreciation for Scouting as a Scout Master.  Nevertheless, I was a lousy Scout and resented my folks for putting me through it.

My Scout Master was retired military.  Lots of gruffness at a time when I just wasn't ready for that. Only one thing he ever taught us stuck with me:  "when you realize you're lost, take a breath, know what ya got, and figure out how to use what you've got to get yourself unlost."

Years later, I got lost in the woods.  The advice from that Scout Master saved my life.  And it's been a great principle for me ever since, in many situations:  "know what ya got."

Most enterprise customers today don't know what they've got.  That knowledge gap leads to filing bugs that aren't really bugs and building customizations when existing functionality gets the job done.  And telling customers to RTM adds almost now value (heck, even most of the people building the software dread reading those things).  If those of us in the industry want our customers to succeed with our products, we have to help by showing and telling.  Which also means we have to earn the trust of our customers, because showing and telling achieves nothing if the audience fails to engage.

So you want to reduce the bogus bug filings?  Cut back on customizations that slow everyone down? Work with your customers.  Customer success starts there.

node-oracledb 1.2.0 is on NPM (Node.js add-on for Oracle Database)

Christopher Jones - Fri, 2015-09-25 09:28

Version 1.2 of node-oracledb, the add-on for Node.js that powers high performance Oracle Database applications, is available on NPM

A lot of good changes have been made.

Our thanks to Bruno Jouhier from Sage for his work on adding RAW support and for fixes for LOB stability. Thanks also go to Bill Christo for pushing us on some Installation topics - look out for his full article on Windows Installation that OTN will be publishing soon.

An annotated list of the changes in this releases are:

  • Added support for RAW data type.

    Bruno contributed a patch to add support for the Oracle RAW datatype. This data type maps to a JavaScript Buffer for inserts, queries and for binding to PL/SQL. Binding RAW for DML RETURNING is not supported. There is an example showing inserting and querying in examples/raw1.js

  • Added a type property to the Lob class to distinguish CLOB and BLOB types.

    This small change will allow introspection on Lob instances so applications can more easily decide how to handle the data.

  • Changed write-only attributes of Connection objects to work with console.log().

    The Connection object had three write-only attributes (action, module, clientId) used for end-to-end tracing and mid-tier authentication. Because they were write-only, anyone doing a simple console.log() on the connection object got a confusing message often leading to the impression that connection had failed. The attributes are write-only for the reasons described in the documentation. With the change in v1.2, a Connection object can now be displayed. The three attributes will show as null (see the doc) while the non- write-only attribute stmtCacheSize will show an actual value. With hindsight the three attributes should have be set via a setter, but they aren't.

  • Added a check to make sure maxRows is greater than zero for non-ResultSet queries.

    If you want to get metaData for a query without getting rows, specify resultSet:true and prefetchRows:0 in the query options (and remember to close the ResultSet).

  • Improved installer messages for Oracle client header and library detection on Linux, OS X and Solaris.

    Some upfront checks now aid detection of invalid environments earlier.

  • Optimized CLOB memory allocation to account for different database-to-client character set expansions.

    In line with the optimization for string buffers in v1.1, users of AL32UTF8 databases will see reduced memory consumption when fetching CLOBs.

  • Fixed a crash while reading a LOB from a closed connection

  • Fixed a crash when selecting multiple rows with LOB values.

    Another fix by Bruno.

  • Corrected the order of Stream 'end' and 'close' events when reading a LOB.

    Bruno was busy this release and sent in a pull request for this too.

  • Fixed AIX-specific REF CURSOR related failures.

  • Fixed intermittent crash while setting fetchAsString, and incorrect output while reading the value.

  • Added a check to return an NJS error when an invalid DML RETURN statement does not give an ORA error.

  • Removed non-portable memory allocation for queries that return NULL.

  • Fixed encoding issues with several files that caused compilation warnings in some Windows environments.

  • Made installation halt sooner for Node.js versions currently known to be unusable.

  • Fixed typo in examples/dbmsoutputgetline.js

Issues and questions about node-oracledb can be posted on GitHub. We value your input to help prioritize work on the add-on. Drop us a line!

Installation instructions are here.

Node-oracledb documentation is here.

ORDS... Yes we can!

Dimitri Gielis - Fri, 2015-09-25 04:55
On September 13th I got a nice surprise, an email of Steven Feuerstein with the message: "You have been selected as a finalist in the ORDS category for the 2015 Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards!"

It's always nice to get recognition for the efforts you do, so thanks so much already for the nomination. I didn't make publicity yet in order to get some up-votes, but I hope by reaching out to the people who read my blog, I gain some more up-votes :)

 

To be honest, I wondered why I deserved this nomination, especially in a category that I'm probably less "known" for.
After giving this more thought, I remembered ORDS actually started being very much linked to APEX. In the early days ORDS was even being called the "APEX Listener", and I was one of the early adopters and promoters of using the APEX Listener (now ORDS) in your APEX architecture.

In 2012 I literally travelled around the world (Belgium, the Netherlands, UK, San Francisco, San Antonio, Uruguay, Brazil, Chile) to talk about why you should move to the APEX Listener.



When looking back at that presentation, today it still stand; you still have different options for your APEX architecture, but we don't have to convince anymore about the benefits of choosing for ORDS. ORDS is now main-stream, widely adopted and proven technology. Unless it's a legacy system, I don't really see any reason anymore why you should not use ORDS in your architecture.

ORDS evolved a lot over time, and the new name reflects more what the core feature is "Oracle REST Data Services". REST web services became so important in the last years and that is exactly what I've been blogging and talking about lately (see further).

In my presentation of Microsoft Sharepoint and Oracle APEX integration (given in San Francisco, BeNeLux and Germany) I talk about the architecture and how you get your APEX data in Microsoft Sharepoint by using ORDS. But also the other way round, by using Sharepoint APIs, REST web services come into play. When you want to integrate with other systems, ORDS can really help.



I didn't blog much yet about a really interesting R&D project we've been working on in the last months - using wearables to capture sensor and patient data. At the Oracle Mobile day in the Netherlands I did a presentation which explains it in more detail. We developed native smarth phone applications that call REST web services all build in ORDS. ORDS is getting or pushing the data into our Oracle Database using JSON. Next to that we've dashboards in APEX to "see" and work with the data. We learned and still learn a lot of this project; about the volume of data, the security etc. but without ORDS it would not have been possible.



And finally a product where I'm really proud of APEX Office Print (AOP). I found it always a challenge to get documents out of APEX. I'll do some more blog posts about it in the future, but where APEX is so declarative to build your web applications, it's far from declarative to get documents out in Word, Excel, Powerpoint or PDF (at least without BI Publisher). With APEX Office Print we hope to address that. Just one APEX plugin where you define the template and which data you want to use and presto you get your document. Behind the scenes we use JSON and having ORDS makes it really easy to generate it. If you want to know more about the components behind the printing solution (and do it yourself), you'll find that in my presentation about Printing through Node.js which I presented in different countries and will present at Oracle Open World.



Furthermore, if you're interested in reading more about JSON, I've done a series of blog posts and was interviewed by Oracle about it, you find the links here.

Hopefully by doing this post you see the power of ORDS and you get some ideas yourself how to best leverage the power of this wonderful piece of software. If you liked my "ORDS-efforts" and want to give me an up-vote in the Database Developer Choice Awards, I really appreciate that.

Thanks so much,
Dimitri

Categories: Development

Oracle Priority Service Infogram for 24-SEP-2015

Oracle Infogram - Thu, 2015-09-24 16:36

OpenWorld

Oracle Data Masking and Subsetting sessions in Open World 2015, from Oracle Data Masking and Subsetting.

Mobile @ Oracle OpenWorld 2015, from The Oracle Mobile Platform Blog.

SOA & Java

Unleash the power of Java API’s on your WLST scripts! from SOA & BPM Partner Community Blog.


Java

From The Java Source:




WebLogic

Lots of WebLogic goodies this week from WebLogic Partner Community EMEA:
:




And from Oracle Partner Hub: ISV Migration Center Team:


Hyperion

Patch Set Update: Hyperion Essbase 11.1.2.4.003, from Business Analytics - Proactive Support.

Solaris

Configuring Secure NFS in Solaris 11, from What the krowteN?

Demantra

New Demantra Log File Parser in PERL, from the Oracle Demantra blog.

EBS

From the Oracle E-Business Suite Support blog:





From the Oracle E-Business Suite Technology blog:




Index Advanced Compression: Multi-Column Index Part II (Blow Out)

Richard Foote - Thu, 2015-09-24 03:00
I previously discussed how Index Advanced Compression can automatically determine not only the correct number of columns to compress, but also the correct number of columns to compress within specific leaf blocks of the index. However, this doesn’t mean we can just order the columns within the index without due consideration from a “compression” perspective. As […]
Categories: DBA Blogs

tracefile tim to readable date format

Laurent Schneider - Wed, 2015-09-23 07:25

In trace file, the time is recorded, this could be used to measure time between two timestamps

But how do you convert 31796862227375 to a human format?

This is how I proceeded :

SQL> oradebug SETMYPID
Statement processed.
SQL> oradebug tracefile_name
/u01/log/oracle/diag/rdbms/db01/DB01/trace/DB01_ora_32440740.trc
SQL> alter session set 
  nls_date_format='YYYY-MM-DD_HH24:MI:SS' 
  sql_trace=true;
Session altered.
SQL> select '&_DATE','Start' from dual;
2015-09-23_13:17:50 Start
SQL> select '&_DATE','End' from dual;
2015-09-23_13:18:38 End
SQL> alter session set sql_trace=false;
Session altered.

I use the sqlplus variable _date and waited about a minute between the select’s.

Now let’s look at the trace

PARSING IN CURSOR #4859519800 tim=31796814530524
select '2015-09-23_13:17:50','Start' from dual

PARSING IN CURSOR #4859511384 tim=31796862227375 
select '2015-09-23_13:18:38','End' from dual

Note the tim=

Between 13:17:50 and 13:18:38 I have 48 seconds; the difference between 31796862227375 and 31796814530524 is 47696851, roughly 48 millions of microseconds.

So the time on this specific version of Oracle is in microseconds.

Now if I substracted 31796862227375 from 2015-09-23_13:17:50 and I get 2014-09-20_12:50:08 on this specific instance.

So to convert tim= to human readable date, I simply add tim microseconds to Sep 20, 2014, 12:50:08.

Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards

Denes Kubicek - Wed, 2015-09-23 00:28
Don't forget to vote for the expert of your choice at https://community.oracle.com/community/database/awards. There are a lot of good men there deserving your voice for their activities in the community and for their selfless engagement.

Categories: Development

HCM Cloud Support Resources

Chris Warticki - Tue, 2015-09-22 16:05
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

First and ALWAYS – the #1 investment is made in the PRODUCT, PRODUCT, PRODUCT.

Remain a student of the product.

1. HCM Cloud PRODUCT Information Page

2. HCM Cloud Documentation Learning Center

3. Get trained on the PRODUCT – HCM Cloud

4. Oracle Learning Library

a.HCM Cloud Library

Personalize My Oracle Support Experience

1. Setup Proactive Alerts and Notifications

2. Customize your MOS Dashboard

3. Remain in the Know – Subscribe to Cloud and HCM Newsletters

Collaborate. Communicate. Connect

1. Oracle Mobile App – News, Events, Mobile MOS, Videos etc

2. Applications Customer Connect

3. My Oracle Support Community

a. Fusion HCM Cloud Community

b. Human Capital Management (HCM)

c. Taleo Knowledge Community

d. Taleo Enterprise

e. Taleo Business

f. Taleo Learn

SOCIAL Circles of Influence

1. Oracle HCM

2. Oracle Cloud Zone

3. Taleo

4. HCM Talk Radio (Podcasts)

5. Cloud Café (Podcasts)

Engage with Oracle Support

1. Upload ALL reports if logging a Service Request

2. Leverage Oracle Collaborative Support (web conferencing)

3. Better Yet – Record your issue and upload it (why wait for a scheduled web conference?)

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

4. Request Management Attention as necessary


/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

Time to Vote for Oracle Database Developer Choice Award Winners!

OTN TechBlog - Tue, 2015-09-22 13:15

The Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards celebrate and recognize technical expertise and contributions in the Oracle Database community. As longtime and new users of Oracle Database move to the Cloud and take advantage of this exciting new architecture, community experts will play a critical role in helping them succeed.

Panels of (mostly) Oracle ACE judges have now selected their finalists, and the time for public voting has begun! From 15 September to 15 October, we call on all members of the Oracle Database developer community to check out the finalists for each of these categories:

The winners of the Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards will be announced at the YesSQL! Celebration during Oracle OpenWorld 2015.

This is your chance to have your say in the community, and help reward great contributors who build up the Oracle Database developer community.

Read the official rules

Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards FAQ

Licht Is Uit? eProseed Shines the Light on IoT and Design Patterns with TopCasuS

Usable Apps - Mon, 2015-09-21 04:27

At the Oracle government and innovation event held in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, Oracle partner eProseed demoed a public sector solution that brought together the Internet of Things (IoT) and Activity Based Working (hat tip: Erik Veldhoen [@erikveldhoen]) to enhance business processes for customers: TopCasuS.  Oracle Applications User Experience design patterns and guidance helped eProseed to build a great solution in a productive and consistent way. eProseed NL managing partner, Lonneke Dikmans (@lonnekedikmans) explains more.

Overheid en Innovatie

Tijdens de Oracle Overheid en Innovatie beurs liet eProseed met hun oplossing voor gemeenten en centrale overheid zien hoe je met behulp van Internet of Things (IoT) bedrijfsprocessen kan optimaliseren en verbeteren. TopCasuS is gebaseerd op Gemma 2.0 principes en het concept ‘activity based working’. Dit betekent dat de gebruiker toegang heeft tot de juist informatie op het juiste moment.

TopCasuS UI using Oracle Alta UI

TopCasuS gebruikt Oracle Alta UI 

Op dit moment zijn de volgende modules beschikbaar:

  • Sociaal domein. Enterprise-grade oplossing voor gemeenten die hen ondersteunt bij het uitvoeren van de drie decentralisaties;
  • Openbare ruimte. Module die gemeenten helpt de openbare gemeente schoon, heel en veilig te houden;
  • Shared services. Module voor gemeenten die fuseren of een shared service aan het inrichten zijn.

Licht Is Uit

De openbare ruimte wordt niet alleen schoon, heel en veilig gehouden met behulp van regulier onderhoud, maar ook door te reageren op meldingen. De meldingen kunnen worden gedaan door burgers via een app of the gemeentelijke website, door ambtenaren en ketenpartners en door gebruik te maken van IoT technieken.

Luc and Lonneke demo at the event

Lonneke en Luc op het evenement met Licht Is Uit

Tijdens het evenement demonstreerden ze het volgende scenario:

  1. Een lichtsensor in een fietstunnel meet de hoeveelheid licht in de tunnel. Mensen voelen zich veilig in een verlichte tunnel. 
  2. Als de tunnel donker is, bijvoorbeeld omdat het licht stuk is, wordt een notificatie verzonden naar het meldingen buitenruimte proces. 
  3. De ambtenaar die verantwoordelijk is voor het gebied van de fietstunnel ontvangt een notificatie dat er een nieuwe zaak is gestart en hij pakt deze op, op dezelfde manier als wanneer een burger of college de melding gedaan zou hebben.

English Language Version

The eProseed TopCasuS solution is based on Gemma 2.0 principles and Erik Veldhoen's (@erikveldhoen) concept of Activity Based Working. This means that the user has access to the right information at the right time. Right now, the following modules are available:

  • Social services. Enterprise grade solution for municipalities (Dutch local government) to support the implementation of new laws about youth care, work, and decentralized social support.
  • Public domain. Module to help municipalities to keep public services and the environment safe, clean, and working properly.
  • Shared services. Module to support municipalities when merging and when they need to implement shared services.

Licht Is Uit (Light Is Out) Demo

Keeping public areas safe, clean, and working properly is carried out by regular servicing, but also by the local authority's reaction to the prompt notifications of issues with their services. These notifications can be triggered by a citizen reporting an issue using a mobile app or a website or by a local authority employee or contractor noticing an issue. But now it can also be reported automatically using the IoT. At the Rotterdam event, eProseed NL CTO and managing partner Luc Bors (@lucb_) demoed with Lonneke how sensors detect an issue and let the local authority know about a problem:

  1. A sensor in a bike tunnel measures the amount of light in the tunnel. Pedestrians and cyclists can go safely through the tunnel.
  2. If a light bulb in the tunnel fails, or something else causes the tunnel to become dark, the sensor detects the change in lighting conditions and a notification is automatically sent to the local authority, creating a new case in their service system.
  3. The local authority employee responsible for the tunnel maintenance receives a notification that a new case has been started, can then assess the situation and process it, just as if a citizen had filed the issue. 

Watch out for more solutions that partners can build productively with reusable UX design patterns and Oracle technology and for demos of the solutions at an event near you soon.

Read more about our eProseed UX enablement event in Utrecht, too.  

ORA-01917: user or role 'PDB_DBA' does not exist

Pakistan's First Oracle Blog - Sat, 2015-09-19 01:42
I manually created a container database (CDB) 12.1.0.2.0 in my Linux 6.4 based virutal machine. After creating it, I tried to create a pluggable database but got following error:




SQL> select instance_name,status from v$instance;

INSTANCE_NAME    STATUS
---------------- ------------
cdbtest          OPEN

1 row selected.

SQL> show con_name

CON_NAME
------------------------------
CDB$ROOT

SQL> select * from cdb_pdbs;

    PDB_ID
----------
PDB_NAME
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      DBID    CON_UID GUID                             STATUS    CREATION_SCN
---------- ---------- -------------------------------- --------- ------------
       VSN LOGGING   FOR FOR     CON_ID
---------- --------- --- --- ----------
         2
PDB$SEED
3972600152 3972600152 201432B4FDA10CEBE0530900000AFE92 NORMAL             213
 202375680 LOGGING   NO  NO           2

SQL> select instance_name,status from v$instance;

INSTANCE_NAME    STATUS
---------------- ------------
cdbtest          OPEN

1 row selected.

SQL> show con_name

CON_NAME
------------------------------
CDB$ROOT
SQL> select * from cdb_pdbs;

    PDB_ID
----------
PDB_NAME
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      DBID    CON_UID GUID                             STATUS    CREATION_SCN
---------- ---------- -------------------------------- --------- ------------
       VSN LOGGING   FOR FOR     CON_ID
---------- --------- --- --- ----------
         2
PDB$SEED
3972600152 3972600152 201432B4FDA10CEBE0530900000AFE92 NORMAL             213
 202375680 LOGGING   NO  NO           2

So I tried with different options, but it always gave that error about PDB_DBA role. Searching the MOS, presented document.

This Document states that if we create a CDB manually we need to get from DBCA because we might have omit some options. CDB and PDB needs to be installed with all the options. I created CDB manually in first place because I had low disk space in my virtual machine, and I was intending to use all the options.

So if you get that error, the solution is to either create database through DBCA.
Categories: DBA Blogs

How to View Field Service Task Information

Joshua Solomin - Fri, 2015-09-18 12:23
If you have a Service Request (SR) that requires hardware replacement or a visit from a hardware support engineer, your SR will have "Field Service Tasks" associated with it. These tasks can be viewed in My Oracle Support as outlined below.

NOTE: If you have Services or MICROS products that require part replacement, you will need to switch to the My Oracle Support Portal to view the field tasks in the SR. (reference A).

1. In My Oracle Support, locate the SR region on the Dashboard or click the Service Request tab and locate your Service Request (reference B).

2. Open the desired Service Request, then click on the Field Service Tasks link (reference C) on the right hand side of the screen under the Summary section. A list of associated Tasks will display (reference D).

3. Click on the desired Task Number for details about that Task. The Task information is displayed and can be sorted using the Sort By drop down menu (reference E).

For additional tips on Service Request management view the My Oracle Support 'How-to' Series (Doc ID 1544005.2).

Pages

Subscribe to Oracle FAQ aggregator