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Starting a Process using a Timer with a Duration in Oracle BPM

Jan Kettenis - Wed, 2015-07-15 10:34
In this blog article I explain three options to configure a timer start event based upon some configurable duration.

As far as I know firing a timer based on a duration is only applicable in case of a Timer Event Sub-process. Let me know if you think otherwise.

In case of an Event Sub-process the timer starts at the same moment when the process instance starts. There is no way to change it at any point after that. Given this , you can use one of the following three options that I discuss below. If you know of some oher way, again: let me know!

Input ArgumentYou can use an element that is part of the request of the process. In the following example there is one input argument called 'expiry' of type duration which is mapped to a process variable:

The process variable can then used to start the timer using an straightforward simple XPath assignment:



Preference in composite.xml
You can also configure a preference in the composite.xml file. Such a preference belongs to a specific component, and starts with "preference" (or "bpel.preference", but you can leave "bpel." out). Using the dot as a delimiter you can post-fix that with the preference name to use:

You can then set the timer using the ora:getPreference() XPath function. All these preferences are strings, but if the value is an ISO duration it will automatically be converted to a duration.


Domain Value Map
A third option is to configure the duration using a Domain Value Map or DVM for short. In the following example a DVM file is used for configuration parameters as a name-value pair:

 

The timer can be instantiated using the dvm:lookupValue() XPath function, as show in the following picture:


What to Choose?
This depends on the requirements.

If your consumer should be able to determine the duration, you should pass it on as a request parameter.

If the business wants to change it run-time than using the DVM is the best option. The initial value is determined design-time but can be changed run-time via SOA Composer (the same tool via which business rules can be changed).

Otherwise the composite preference is your weapon of choice. Also for this preference the initial value is determined design-time, but can still be changed after deployment by IT using the MBean Browser in Enterprise Manager.

Another new APEX-based public website goes live

Tony Andrews - Wed, 2015-07-15 07:48
Another APEX public website I worked on with Northgate Public Services has just gone live: https://londontribunals.org.uk/ This is a website to handle appeals against parking fines and other traffic/environmental fines issues by London local authorities. It is built on APEX 4.2 using a bespoke theme that uses the Bootstrap framework.  A responsive design has been used so that the site works Tony Andrewshttp://www.blogger.com/profile/16750945985361011515noreply@blogger.com1http://tonyandrews.blogspot.com/2015/07/another-new-apex-based-public-website.html

APEX 5 - Opening and Closing Modal Window

Denes Kubicek - Wed, 2015-07-15 05:56
This example is showing how to open a Modal Page from any element in your application. It is easy to get it working using some standards like a button or a link in a report. However, it is not 100% clear how to get it working with some other elements which don't have the redirect functionality built in (item, region title, custom links, etc.). This example is also showing how to get the success message displayed on the parent page after closing of the Modal Page.

Categories: Development

Shift Command in Shell Script in AIX and Linux

Pakistan's First Oracle Blog - Tue, 2015-07-14 22:42
Shell in Unix never ceases to surprise. Stumbled upon 'shift 2' command in AIX few hours ago and it's very useful.

'Shift n' command shifts the parameters passed to a shell script by 'n' numbers to the left.

For example:

if you have a shell script which takes 3 parameters like:

./mytest.sh arg1 arg2 arg3

and you use shift 2 in your shell script, then the values of arg1 and arg2 will be lost and the value of arg3 will get assigned to arg1.

For example:

if you have a shell script which takes 2 parameters like:

./mytest arg1 and arg2

and you use shift 2, then values of both arg1 and arg2 will be lost.

Following is a working example of shift command in AIX:

testsrv>touch shifttest.sh

testsrv>chmod a+x shifttest.sh

testsrv>vi shifttest.sh

testsrv>cat shifttest.sh
#!/bin/ksh
SID=$1
BACKUP_TYPE=$2
echo "Before Shift: $1 and $2 => SID=$SID and BACKUPTYPE=$BACKUP_TYPE"
shift 2
echo "After Shift: $1 and $2 => SID=$SID and BACKUPTYPE=$BACKUP_TYPE"


testsrv>./shifttest.sh orc daily

Before Shift: orc and daily => SID=orc and BACKUPTYPE=daily
After Shift:  and  => SID=orc and BACKUPTYPE=daily


Note that the values of arguments passed has been shifted to left, but the values of variables has remained intact.
Categories: DBA Blogs

This Is Not Glossy Marketing But You Still Won’t Believe Your Eyes. EMC XtremIO 4.0 Snapshot Refresh For Agile Test / Dev Storage Provisioning in Oracle Database Environments.

Kevin Closson - Tue, 2015-07-14 19:18

This is just a quick blog post to direct readers to a YouTube video I recently created to help explain to someone how flexible EMC XtremIO Snapshots are. The power of this array capability is probably most appreciated in the realm of provisioning storage for Test and Development environments.

Although this is a silent motion picture I think it will speak volumes–or at least 1,000 words.

Please note: This is just a video demonstration to show the base mechanisms and how they relate to Oracle Database with Automatic Storage Management. This is not a scale demonstration. XtremIO snapshots are supported to in the thousands and extremely powerful “sibling trees” are fully supported.

Not Your Father’s Snapshot Technology

No storage array on the market is as flexible as XtremIO in the area of writable snapshots. This video demonstration shows how snapshots allow the administrator of a “DEV” host–using Oracle ASM–to quickly refresh to current or past versions of ASM disk group contents from the “PROD” environment.

The principles involved in this demonstration are:

  1. XtremIO snapshots are crash consistent.
  2. XtremIO snapshots are immediately created, writeable and space efficient. There is no fixed “donor” relationship. Snapshots can be created from other snapshots and refreshes can go in any direction.
  3. XtremIO snapshot refresh does not involve the host operating system. Snapshot and volume contents can be immediately “swapped” (refreshed) at the array level without any action on the host.

Regarding number 3 on that list, I’ll point out that while the operating system does not play a role in the snapshot operations per se, applications will be sensitive to contents of storage immediately changing. It is only for this reason that there are any host actions at all.

Are Host Operations Involved? Crash Consistent Does Not Mean Application-Coherent

The act of refreshing XtremIO snapshots does not change the SCSI WWN information so hosts do not have any way of knowing the contents of a LUN have changed. In the Oracle Database use case the following must be considered:

  1. With a file system based database one must unmount the file systems before refreshing a snapshot otherwise the file system will be corrupted. This should not alarm anyone. A snapshot refresh is an instantaneous content replacement at the array level. Operationally speaking, file system based databases only require database instance shutdown and the unmounting of the file system in preparation for application-coherent snapshot refresh.
  2. With an ASM based database one must dismount the ASM disk group in preparation for snapshot refresh. To that end, ASM database snapshot restore does not involve system administration in any way.

The video is 5 minutes long and it will show you the following happenings along a timeline:

  1. “PROD” and “DEV” database hosts (one physical and one virtual) each showing the same Oracle database (identical DBID) and database creation time as per dictionary views. This establishes the “donor”<->clone relationship. DEV is a snapshot of PROD. It is begat of a snapshot of a PROD consistency group
  2. A single-row token table called  “test” in the PROD database has value “1.” The DEV database does not even have the token table (DEV is independent of PROD…it’s been changing..but its origins are rooted in PROD as per point #1)
  3. At approximately 41 seconds into the video I take a snapshot of the PROD consistency group with “value 1” in the token table. This step prepares for “time travel” later in the demonstration
  4. I then update the PROD token table to contain the value “42”
  5. At ~2:02 into the video I have already dismounted DEV ASM disk groups and started clobbering DEV with the current state of PROD via a snapshot refresh. This is “catching up to PROD”
    1. Please note: No action at all was needed on the PROD side. The refresh of DEV from PROD is a logical, crash-consistent point in time image
  6. At ~2:53 into the video you’ll see that the DEV database instance has already been booted and that it has value “42” (step #4). This means DEV has “caught up to PROD”
  7. At ~3:32 you’ll see that I use dd(1) to copy the redo LUN over the data LUN on the DEV host to introduce ASM-level corruption
  8. At 3:57 the DEV database is shown as corrupted. In actuality, the ASM disk group holding the DEV database is corrupted
  9. In order to demonstrate traveling back in time, and to recover from the dd(1) corrupting of the ASM disk group,  you’ll see at 4:31 I chose to refresh from the snapshot I took at step #3
  10. At 5:11 you’ll see that DEV has healed from the dd(1) destruction of the ASM disk group, the database instance is booted, and the value in the token table is reverted to 1 (step #3) thus DEV has traveled back in time

Please note: In the YouTube box you can click to view full screen or on youtube.com if the video quality is a problem:

More Information

For information on the fundamentals of EMC XtremIO snapshot technology please refer to the following EMC paper: The fundamentals of XtremIO snapshot technology

For independent validation of XtremIO snapshot technology in a highly-virtualized environment with Oracle Database 12c please click on the following link: Principled Technologies, Inc Whitepaper

For a proven solution whitepaper showing massive scale data sharing with XtremIO snapshots please click on the following link: EMC Whitepaper on massive scale database consolidation via XtremIO


Filed under: oracle

Coming Soon - PeopleTools Customer Beta Program

PeopleSoft Technology Blog - Tue, 2015-07-14 15:07
The PeopleTools team continues to push forward, ever improving the features and capabilities of PeopleTools.  Recently, you may have seen some of the planned enhancements for PeopleTools 8.55 discussed on MyOracleSupport in the Planned Features and Enhancements area.  This document has replaced the Release Value Proposition that has been used previously to highlight features to look for in the upcoming PeopleTools release. 

There are a number of cool features that we’re working on, including the Cloud Deployment Architecture (CDA) which will provide greater flexibility in the installation and patching of environments.  Additional planned features include Analytics for PeopleSoft Update Manager (PUM), Fluid dashboards/homepages and Simplified Analytics….just to name a few.

 We plan to kick off the PeopleTools 8.55 Beta Program in the relatively near future, and have an opening for a customer who’s willing to closely partner with us.  If you are looking to get your hands on the next release so that you can thoroughly test out some of these features in your own environment to see the benefits, perhaps you are the one we’re looking for.  Does your team have the skills and desire to take beta code and run with it?  Can your organization get a standard beta trial license agreement signed promptly?  We want to work with a customer that’s going to dive in, and really exercise the new features - If that’s you, email me (mark.hoernemann@oracle.com) and let’s talk.  Please keep in mind that this is a small beta – I’ve only got room for one, maybe two customers.   

July 2015 Critical Patch Update Released

Oracle Security Team - Tue, 2015-07-14 14:59

Hello, this is Eric Maurice.

Oracle today released the July2015 Critical Patch Update. TheCritical Patch Update program is Oracle’s primary mechanism for the release ofsecurity fixes across all Oracle products, including security fixes intended toaddress vulnerabilities in third-party components included in Oracle’s productdistributions.

The July2015 Critical Patch Update provides fixes for 193 new securityvulnerabilities across a wide range of product families including: OracleDatabase, Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Hyperion, Oracle Enterprise Manager,Oracle E-Business Suite, Oracle Supply Chain Suite, Oracle PeopleSoftEnterprise, Oracle Siebel CRM, Oracle Communications Applications, Oracle JavaSE, Oracle Sun Systems Products Suite, Oracle Linux and Virtualization, andOracle MySQL.

Out of these 193 fixes, 44 are for third-party componentsincluded in Oracle products distributions (e.g., Qemu, Glibc, etc.)

This CriticalPatch Update provides 10 fixes for the Oracle Database, and 2 of theDatabase vulnerabilities fixed in today’s Critical Patch Update are remotelyexploitable without authentication. Themost severe of these database vulnerabilities has received a CVSS Base Score of9.0 for the Windows platform and 6.5 for Linux and Unix platforms. This vulnerability (CVE-2015-2629) reflectsthe availability of new Java fixes for the Java VM in the database.

With this CriticalPatch Update, Oracle Fusion Middleware receives 39 new security fixes, 36of which are for vulnerabilities which are remotely exploitable withoutauthentication. The highest CVSS BaseScore for these Fusion Middleware vulnerabilities is 7.5.

This CriticalPatch Update also includes a number of fixes for Oracle applications. Oracle E-Business Suite gets 13 fixes, OracleSupply Chain Suite gets 7, PeopleSoft Enterprise gets 8, and Siebel gets 5fixes. Rounding up this list are 2 fixesfor the Oracle Commerce Platform.

The Oracle Communications Applications receive 2 newsecurity fixes. The highest CVSS BaseScore for these vulnerabilities is 10.0, this score is for vulnerabilityCVE-2015-0235, which affects Glibc, a component used in the OracleCommunications Session Border Controller. Note that this same Glibc vulnerability is also addressed in a number ofOracle Sun Systems products.

Also included in this CriticalPatch Update are 25 fixes Oracle Java SE. 23 of these Java SE vulnerabilities are remotely exploitable withoutauthentication. 16 of these Java SE fixesare for Java client-only, including one fix for the client installation of JavaSE. 5 of the Java fixes are for clientand server deployment. One fix isspecific to the Mac platform. And 4fixes are for JSSE client and server deployments. Please note that this Critical Patch Updatealso addresses a recentlyannounced 0-day vulnerability (CVE-2015-2590), which was being reported asactively exploited in the wild.

This Critical PatchUpdate addresses 25 vulnerabilities in Oracle Berkeley DB, and none of thesevulnerabilities are remotely exploitable without authentication. The highest CVSS Base score reported forthese vulnerabilities is 6.9.

Note that the CVSSstandard was recently updated to version 3.0. In a previousblog entry, Darius Wiles highlighted some of the enhancements introduced bythis new version. Darius will soonpublish another blog entry to discuss this updated CVSS standard and itsimplication for Oracle’s future security advisories. Note that the CVSS Base Score reported in therisk matrices in today’s Critical Patch Update were based on CVSS v2.0.

For More Information:

The July 2015 Critical Patch Update advisory is located at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/cpujul2015-2367936.html

The Oracle Software Security Assurance web site is locatedat http://www.oracle.com/us/support/assurance

July 2015 Critical Patch Update Released

Oracle Security Team - Tue, 2015-07-14 14:59

Hello, this is Eric Maurice.

Oracle today released the July 2015 Critical Patch Update. The Critical Patch Update program is Oracle’s primary mechanism for the release of security fixes across all Oracle products, including security fixes intended to address vulnerabilities in third-party components included in Oracle’s product distributions.

The July 2015 Critical Patch Update provides fixes for 193 new security vulnerabilities across a wide range of product families including: Oracle Database, Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Hyperion, Oracle Enterprise Manager, Oracle E-Business Suite, Oracle Supply Chain Suite, Oracle PeopleSoft Enterprise, Oracle Siebel CRM, Oracle Communications Applications, Oracle Java SE, Oracle Sun Systems Products Suite, Oracle Linux and Virtualization, and Oracle MySQL.

Out of these 193 fixes, 44 are for third-party components included in Oracle products distributions (e.g., Qemu, Glibc, etc.)

This Critical Patch Update provides 10 fixes for the Oracle Database, and 2 of the Database vulnerabilities fixed in today’s Critical Patch Update are remotely exploitable without authentication. The most severe of these database vulnerabilities has received a CVSS Base Score of 9.0 for the Windows platform and 6.5 for Linux and Unix platforms. This vulnerability (CVE-2015-2629) reflects the availability of new Java fixes for the Java VM in the database.

With this Critical Patch Update, Oracle Fusion Middleware receives 39 new security fixes, 36 of which are for vulnerabilities which are remotely exploitable without authentication. The highest CVSS Base Score for these Fusion Middleware vulnerabilities is 7.5.

This Critical Patch Update also includes a number of fixes for Oracle applications. Oracle E-Business Suite gets 13 fixes, Oracle Supply Chain Suite gets 7, PeopleSoft Enterprise gets 8, and Siebel gets 5 fixes. Rounding up this list are 2 fixes for the Oracle Commerce Platform.

The Oracle Communications Applications receive 2 new security fixes. The highest CVSS Base Score for these vulnerabilities is 10.0, this score is for vulnerability CVE-2015-0235, which affects Glibc, a component used in the Oracle Communications Session Border Controller. Note that this same Glibc vulnerability is also addressed in a number of Oracle Sun Systems products.

Also included in this Critical Patch Update are 25 fixes Oracle Java SE. 23 of these Java SE vulnerabilities are remotely exploitable without authentication. 16 of these Java SE fixes are for Java client-only, including one fix for the client installation of Java SE. 5 of the Java fixes are for client and server deployment. One fix is specific to the Mac platform. And 4 fixes are for JSSE client and server deployments. Please note that this Critical Patch Update also addresses a recently announced 0-day vulnerability (CVE-2015-2590), which was being reported as actively exploited in the wild.

This Critical Patch Update addresses 25 vulnerabilities in Oracle Berkeley DB, and none of these vulnerabilities are remotely exploitable without authentication. The highest CVSS Base score reported for these vulnerabilities is 6.9.

Note that the CVSS standard was recently updated to version 3.0. In a previous blog entry, Darius Wiles highlighted some of the enhancements introduced by this new version. Darius will soon publish another blog entry to discuss this updated CVSS standard and its implication for Oracle’s future security advisories. Note that the CVSS Base Score reported in the risk matrices in today’s Critical Patch Update were based on CVSS v2.0.

For More Information:

The July 2015 Critical Patch Update advisory is located at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/cpujul2015-2367936.html

The Oracle Software Security Assurance web site is located at http://www.oracle.com/us/support/assurance

ORDS - Auto REST table feature

Kris Rice - Tue, 2015-07-14 10:47
Got a question on how easy it is to use ORDS to perform insert | update | delete on a table.  Here's the steps. 1) Install ORDS ( cmd line or there's a new wizard in sqldev ) 2) Enable the schema and table in this case klrice.emp; ( again there's a wizard in sqldev ) BEGIN ORDS.ENABLE_SCHEMA(p_enabled => TRUE, p_schema => 'KLRICE',

REST Data Services and SQL Developer

Kris Rice - Tue, 2015-07-14 10:47
The database tools team released 3 new GA releases and an update to our SQLCL. Official Releases are here:    SQL Developer, Modeler, and Data Miner:        https://blogs.oracle.com/otn/entry/news_oracle_updates_development_tools        https://blogs.oracle.com/datamining/entry/oracle_data_miner_4_1   REST Data Services now with SODA        https://blogs.oracle.com/otn/entry/

Latest Release of Oracle Exadata Exachk and HealthCheck

VitalSoftTech - Mon, 2015-07-13 15:13
Announcing the release of Exachk Version 12.1.0.2.4_20150702. Exachk is a tool that is used to quickly determine the health of the entire Exadata infrastructure. Some of the key components that are checked include the database, cell servers and the network. This tool further reviews the configuration of the system and compares with the best practices. […]
Categories: DBA Blogs

ORA-04030 Out of Process Memory When Trying To Allocate s Bytes

VitalSoftTech - Mon, 2015-07-13 14:47
What is the cause of the "ORA-04030 out of process memory when trying to allocate s bytes" error? How do I resolve this?
Categories: DBA Blogs

How To Keep Calm at Work

Complete IT Professional - Mon, 2015-07-13 06:00

How To Keep Calm at WorkAs part of your job in the IT industry, there will no doubt be times that you will get annoyed and stressed. Learn how to keep calm at work with some tips in this article.

Take a Deep Breath

When I’m not feeling calm at work, the first thing I do is stop and take a big, deep breath. It makes me stop what I’m doing for a few seconds and focus just on the breath that I’m taking.

It always makes me feel better, especially when I’m annoyed about something.

So, next time you’re feeling stressed, annoyed, or irritated about something at work, try this.

  • Stop what you’re dong.
  • Take one big deep breath in.
  • Breathe it all out.
  • Resume what you were doing.

That whole process only takes about ten seconds. But, it allows you to re-focus on what you’re doing and can have a calming effect on you.

 

Remember the Bigger Picture

Another tip that I can suggest to keep calm at work is to remember the bigger picture of why you’re there.

If you’re getting annoyed at someone else or having a disagreement with them over the way a certain feature should be developed for your project, for example, then one thing you can do is to try think of the bigger picture.

What’s the overall plan for what you’re doing? What are you both trying to achieve?

If you have different ideas on how something should be done, for example, you could be disagreeing over how it’s being done. Think about why you’re both there, on the project.

Are you trying to add a new feature to make the customers’ lives easier? Are you trying to improve an internal system? Make a new system from scratch?

If you can see what you’re both trying to do at a high level, and see things from the other person’s point of view, it can help you keep calm at work.

 

Get Away From Your Desk

Another tip I can suggest is to get away form your desk if you want to calm down.

You can try go for a walk outside. Get out of the office and get some fresh air. Walk around the block, down to th ecar park, to the coffee shop – anything to get outside and get some fresh air.

The exercise, the fresh air, and taking a break from your work all contribute to helping you keep calm at work. It can also give you more energy.

If you can’t walk outside for whatever reason, if it’s pouring with rain for example, then take a walk to the ktichen or somewhere else inside.

You can go get a coffee or a glass of water or something. This can help you feel better at work and also gets you away from the desk.

In any case, when you return to what you were doing, you should feel a little calmer and a little better.

 

Vent To A Friend

We can do all of the breathing and walking outside that we want, but sometimes, it just isn’t enough.

I mean, most of the time it works for me, but there’s been a few times over the years where I’ve felt really annoyed.

If you feel the same way, then speak to a friend of yours about it and tell them the story.

You can speak to your partner, a friend outside work, a family member, or someone in your team, depending on the issue.

Sometimes it can really help if you just get it off your shoulders and just express the way you’re feeling to someone.

It’s not something I suggest doing all of the time, but it can help sometimes if you really just can’t focus on your work and whatever the issue is has really thrown you off your game.

 

Readers: What methods do you use to keep calm at work after something goes wrong? Do you have any other tips to share about staying calm? Share them in the comments section below.

Career Action Tip: Next time you’re feeling annoyed about something at work, remember to take a deep breath and consider going for a short walk outside.

Lastly, if you enjoy the information and career advice I’ve been providing, sign up to my newsletter below to stay up-to-date on my articles. You’ll also receive a fantastic bonus. Thanks!

Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Categories: Development

Oracle Exadata Database Machine Implementation Essentials - Exam cleared

Syed Jaffar - Mon, 2015-07-13 04:04
I have cleared my 'Oracle Exadata Database Machine Implementation Essentails' exam on 9-July-2015. This has been really one of the good weeks of my life. My latest Oracle book, 'Oracle Exadata Expert's Handbook' was released on 6-July-2015, passed the exam on 9-July-2015, can't ask for more.

Thank you my dears and nears.

Oracle Exadata Expert's Handbook - is out now

Syed Jaffar - Mon, 2015-07-13 03:59
I am happy to share a good news with the Oracle community today. Our latest book 'Oracle Exadata Expert's Handbook' authored by well-known Oracle gurus is hit the racks on 6-July-2015.

Contents if you wish know what has been covered in this book



Order your copy now at Pearson or Amazon

We hope the book will meet your expectations and will add more knowledge your skill set.  

Announcing SLOB 2.3. Tarry Not, Get It While It’s Hot!

Kevin Closson - Sun, 2015-07-12 12:48

BLOG UPDATE 2015.07.16: SLOB 2.3.0.3-1 is now the current version.

This is just a quick post to announce SLOB 2.3. Please visit the SLOB Resources page to download the gzipped tar archive. The SLOB Resources page also has a link the SLOB 2.3 Documentation. SLOB Resources Page: Click Here. New in this release:

  1. The documentation is now also included in the tar archive under SLOB/doc in PDF form.
  2. SLOB 2.3 introduces the SLOB Single Schema feature. Please see the documentation.
  3. Because of SLOB Single Schema the kit now supports SLOB Threads. Note, however, SLOB Threads can be used in either Single or Multiple Schema Model.
  4. SLOB 2.3 has two types of “Hot Spots”
    1. In Multiple Schema Model there are both per-schema Hot Spots and a Hot Schema. Please see the SLOB 2.3 documentation for descriptions of these features.
  5. Improved error handling for both the SLOB Data Loader (setup.sh) and Test Execution program (runit.sh).
  6. Licensing. Prior releases of SLOB consisted of copyrighted programs with unclear licensing. Please don’t be alarmed. SLOB is still free to use. The LICENSE file defines the word “use.”

Filed under: oracle

SLOB 2.3 User Guide

Kevin Closson - Fri, 2015-07-10 20:13

SLOB 2.3 is releasing within the next 48 hours. In case anyone wants to read about all the new features here is a link to the SLOB 2.3 User Guide:

SLOB 2.3 User Guide (pdf)

 


Filed under: oracle

Code Studio rocks; diversity does, too

Catherine Devlin - Fri, 2015-07-10 18:08

If you want to quickly get some kids introduced to computer programming concepts, you could do a lot worse than using Code Studiofrom code.org. That's what I did the last couple weeks - took two hours to lightly shepherd the Dayton YWCA day camp through a programming intro.

It's really well-organized and easy to understand - frankly, it pretty much drives itself. It's based on block-dragging for turtle graphics and/or simple 2D games, all easy and appealing stuff. (They even got their turtle graphics branded as the sisters from Frozen ice-skating!) I didn't need to do much more than stand there and demonstrate that programmers actually exist in the flesh, and occasionally nudge a student over a bump. Though, by pair programming, they did most of the nudging themselves.

Here's most of my awesome class. Sorry I'm as bad at photography as at CSS.

Hey - we got demographics, huh? Right - if you announce that you're teaching a coding class through your usual geeky circles, they spread the word among their circles and recruit you a class that looks pretty much like the industry already looks. And if you seek a venue through your geeky circles, the usual suspects will step up to host. In badly segregated Dayton, that means "as far from the colored parts of town as possible." That's less than inviting to the people who don't live there.

But if you partner with groups that already have connections in diverse communities - like the YWCA, which makes anti-racism one of its keystones - getting some fresh faces can be pretty easy! And there are venues available outside the bleached-white exurbs you're used to - you just need to think to look.

Another benefit of Code Studio is that it's entirely web-based, so you don't need to restrict your demographics to "kids whose parents can afford to get them laptops". The public library's computer classroom did the job with flying colors.

Seriously, this was about the easiest outreach I've ever done. I'm working on the follow-up, but I think I'll be able to find further lazy options. Quite likely it will leverage CodeAcademy. So, what's your excuse for not doing it in your city?

Now, in other news: You are running out of time to register for PyOhio, a fantastic, friendly, free, all-levels Python conference, and my pride and joy. The schedule is amazing this year, and for better or for worse, I'm keynoting. So please come and add to my terror.

Hot Deployment in JDeveloper 12c - Don't Stop/Start Your App

Shay Shmeltzer - Fri, 2015-07-10 16:45

Old habits are hard to get rid off, and I still see long time users of JDeveloper (and also many new users) who are stopping/starting their application on the embedded WebLogic each time that they make a change or addition to their code.

Well you should stop it! (I mean stop stopping the application).

For a while now, JDeveloper has support for hot deployment that means that when you do most of the changes to your code you just need to do save-all followed by a rebuild of your viewController project - and that's it.

You can then go to your browser and reload your page - and the changes will be reflected there.  This will not only save you the time it takes to undeploy and redeploy your app, it will also reduce the amount of memory you use since frequent redeployment of the app on the embedded WebLogic leads to bigger memory consumption.

In the demo below I use JDeveloper 12.1.3 to show you that I can just do the save->rebuild and pick up:

  • Changes in the JSF file
  • Changes to the JSF configuration file adfc-config.xml
  • New classes that are added to both the model and viewController projects
  • Changed to the ADF configuration files (pagedefs, data binding, data controls)

So for most cases, you should be covered with this hot-deployment capability.

There are some cases that will require a redeploy of the application (for example if you add a new skin css file, or if you change some runtime configuration of your app in web.xml) but for most cases you don't need to continue with the stop/start habit.

Categories: Development

OTN Virtual Technology Summit – Spotlight on Database Tracks

OTN TechBlog - Fri, 2015-07-10 10:00

The Virtual Technology Summit is a series of interactive online events with hands-on sessions and presenters answering technical questions. The events are sponsored by the Oracle Technology Network (OTN). These are free events but you must register.

Database - Mastering Oracle Database Technologies:

Oracle Database 12c delivers market-leading security, high performance, availability and scalability for Cloud application deployments. The OTN Virtual Technology Summit offers two Database tracks: one focused on Cloud application development and deployment practices and the other on the Developing and deploying .Net applications on the Oracle platform. Sessions focus on Oracle Database Cloud Services, Oracle .Net development tools and technologies and more.

Track One Sessions include:

Best Practices for Migrating On-Premises Databases to the Cloud: Oracle Multitenant is helping organizations reduce IT costs by simplifying database consolidation, provisioning, upgrades, and more. Now you can combine the advantages of multitenant databases with the benefits of the cloud by leveraging Database as a Service (DBaaS). In this session, you’ll learn about key best practices for moving your databases from on-premises environments to the Oracle Database Cloud and back again.

Master Data Management (MDM) Using Oracle Table Access for Hadoop: The new Hadoop 2 architecture leads to a bloom of compute engines including MapReduce v2, Apache Spark, Apache Tez, Apache Storm, Apache Giraph, Cloudera Impala, GraphLab, Splunk Hunk, Microsoft Dryad, SAS HPA/LASR, and Oracle Big Data SQL.Some Hadoop applications such as Master Data Management and Advanced Analytics perform the majority of their processing from Hadoop but need access to data in Oracle database which is the reliable and auditable source of truth. This technical session introduces upcoming Oracle Table Access for Hadoop (OTA4H) which exposes Oracle database tables as Hadoop data sources. It will describe OTA4H architecture, projected features, performance/scalability optimizations, and discuss use cases. A demo of various Hive SQL and Spark SQL queries against Oracle table will be shown.

Hot Tips: Mastering SQL Developer Data Modeler: Oracle SQL Developer Data Modeler (SDDM) has been around for a few years now and is up to version 4.1. It really is an industrial strength data modeling tool that can be used for any data modeling task you need to tackle. Over the years I have found quite a few features and utilities in the tool that I rely on to make me more efficient (and agile) in developing my models. This presentation will demonstrate at least five of these features, tips, and tricks for you. I will walk through things like modifying the delivered reporting templates, how to create and applying object naming templates, how to use a table template and transformation script to add audit columns to every table, and using the new meta data export tool and several other cool things you might not know are there. Get SDDM installed on your device and bring it to the session so you can follow along.

Track Two Sessions include:

What's New for Oracle and .NET - (Part 1): With the release of ODAC 12c Release 4 and Oracle Database 12c, .NET developers have many more features to increase productivity and ease development. These sessions explore the following new features introduced in recent releases:

  • Visual Studio 2015 and .NET Framework 4.6
  • Entity Framework Code First and Code First Migrations
  • NuGet installation
  • Schema compare tools
  • ODP.NET, Managed Driver
  • Multitenant container database management
  • ODP.NET application high availability
  • Ease of .NET development features

Oracle product managers will present these sessions with code and tool demonstrations using Visual Studio 2015.

What's New for Oracle and .NET - (Part 2): With the release of ODAC 12c Release 4 and Oracle Database 12c, .NET developers have many more features to increase productivity and ease development. These sessions explore the following new features introduced in recent releases:

  • Visual Studio 2015 and .NET Framework 4.6
  • Entity Framework Code First and Code First Migrations
  • NuGet installation
  • Schema compare tools
  • ODP.NET, Managed Driver
  • Multitenant container database management
  • ODP.NET application high availability
  • Ease of .NET development features

Oracle product managers will present these sessions with code and tool demonstrations using Visual Studio 2015.

Oracle and .NET: Best Practices for Performance: This session explores .NET coding and tuning best practices to achieve faster data access performance. It presents techniques and trade-offs for optimizing connection pooling, caching, data fetching and updating, statement batching, and Oracle datatype usage. We will also explore using Oracle Performance Analyzer from Visual Studio to tune a .NET application's use of the Oracle Database end to end.

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NEW REWARDS! If you attend this virtual technology summit and are a member of the Oracle Technology Network Community you will earn 150 points towards our new Rewards and Recognition program (use the same email for both). Read all about it in our FAQ: Oracle Community – Rewards & Recognition FAQ.

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