Feed aggregator

OWB - 11.2.0.4 standalone client released

Antonio Romero - Fri, 2013-08-30 16:29

The 11.2.0.4 release of OWB containing the 32 bit and 64 bit clients is released today. Big thanks to Anil for spearheading that, another milestone on the Data Integration roadmap.

Below are the patch numbers;

  • 17389934 - OWB 11.2.0.4 STANDALONE CLIENT FOR LINUX X86 64 BIT
  • 17389949 - OWB 11.2.0.4 STANDALONE CLIENT FOR LINUX X86 32 BIT

The windows releases will come in due course. This is the terminal release of OWB and customer bugs will be resolved on top of this release.

Sure and Stedfast has been a steady motto through my life, it came from way back in my old Boys Brigade days back in Scotland. Working in Oracle I have always reflected back on that over the years, can still hear 'Will your anchor hold in the storms of life' ringing in my ear. The ride through different development organizations from Oracle Tools, through Oracle Database and Oracle Middleware groups, from buildings 200, to 400 to 100, 7th floor, 9th floor, 5th floor, countless acquisitions and integrations. Constant change in some aspects, but zeroes and ones remain zeroes and ones, for our group the direction and goals were well understood. Whilst its been quiet on the OWB blogging front, the data integration development organization has been busy, very busy releasing versions of OWB and ODI over the past few years and building the 12c release.

So to 12c... our data integration product roadmap has been a strong focal point in our development over the past few years and that's what we have been using to focus our energy and and our direction. Like personal life we need a goal, a vision and a roadmap for getting there. There have been plenty of challenges along the way; technical, political and personal - its been a tough and challenging few years on all of those fronts, its when you are faced with momentous personal challenges that the technical ones look trivial. The most gratifying aspect is when you see light at the end of the tunnel. It's that light at the end of the tunnel that gives you added strength to finish the job at hand. Onwards and upwards!

OWB - 11.2.0.4 standalone client released

Antonio Romero - Fri, 2013-08-30 16:29

The 11.2.0.4 release of OWB containing the 32 bit and 64 bit clients is released today. Big thanks to Anil for spearheading that, another milestone on the Data Integration roadmap.

Below are the patch numbers;

  • 17389934 - OWB 11.2.0.4 STANDALONE CLIENT FOR LINUX X86 64 BIT
  • 17389949 - OWB 11.2.0.4 STANDALONE CLIENT FOR LINUX X86 32 BIT

The windows releases will come in due course. This is the terminal release of OWB and customer bugs will be resolved on top of this release.

Sure and Stedfast has been a steady motto through my life, it came from way back in my old Boys Brigade days back in Scotland. Working in Oracle I have always reflected back on that over the years, can still hear 'Will your anchor hold in the storms of life' ringing in my ear. The ride through different development organizations from Oracle Tools, through Oracle Database and Oracle Middleware groups, from buildings 200, to 400 to 100, 7th floor, 9th floor, 5th floor, countless acquisitions and integrations. Constant change in some aspects, but zeroes and ones remain zeroes and ones, for our group the direction and goals were well understood. Whilst its been quiet on the OWB blogging front, the data integration development organization has been busy, very busy releasing versions of OWB and ODI over the past few years and building the 12c release.

So to 12c... our data integration product roadmap has been a strong focal point in our development over the past few years and that's what we have been using to focus our energy and and our direction. Like personal life we need a goal, a vision and a roadmap for getting there. There have been plenty of challenges along the way; technical, political and personal - its been a tough and challenging few years on all of those fronts, its when you are faced with momentous personal challenges that the technical ones look trivial. The most gratifying aspect is when you see light at the end of the tunnel. It's that light at the end of the tunnel that gives you added strength to finish the job at hand. Onwards and upwards!

I'm not available

Catherine Devlin - Thu, 2013-08-29 13:23

I'm happy to say that I'll shortly be starting a new position as a PostgreSQL DBA and Python developer for Zoro Tools!

We software types seem to have hardware envy sometimes. We have "builds" and "engines" and "forges" and "factory functions". But as it turns out, the "Tools" in "Zoro Tools" isn't a metaphor for cleverly arranged bytes. That's right - they're talking about the physical objects in your garage! Imagine! Lucky for me the interviewers didn't ask to review my junior high shop project.

So disregard my earlier post about being available. Thanks for all your well-wishes!

Depending on how you reckon it, my job search arguably only took forty minutes, though it took a while for gears to grind and finalize everything. Years of building relationships at PyCon made this the best job search ever; the only unpleasant part was having to choose from among the opportunities to work with my favorite technologies and people. I'm very glad I made the investment in PyCon over the years... and if you're thinking "that's easy for you to say, I can't afford it", don't forget PyCon's financial aid program.

And speaking of conferences, I'll be at Postgres Open next month (my first one!) - hope to see some of you there!

The Difference Between Access Manager 10g and 11g Webgates

Mark Wilcox - Thu, 2013-08-29 11:00

A common question we get is what is the difference between Access Manager 10g and Access Manager 11g webgates.

My colleague Yagnesh who covers webgates put together a simple list:

Here is 11g features:

  • Oracle Universal Installer for platform. Generic for all platforms
  • Host-based cookie
  • Individual WebGate OAMAuthnCookie_ making it more secure
  • A per agent key, and server key, are used. Agent key is stored in wallet file and Server key is stored in Credential store
  • One per-agent secret key shared between 11g WebGate and OAM Server One OAM Server key
  • OAM 11g supports cross-network-domain single sign-on out of the box. Oracle recommends you use Oracle Identity Federation for this situation.
  • Capability to act as a detached credential collector
  • Webgate Authorization Caching
  • Diagnostic page to tune parameters
  • Has separate install and configuration option. Hence, single install and multiple instance configuration is supported.

And 10g:

  • InstallShield and One installer per platform
  • Domain-based cookie
  • ObSSOCookie (one for all 10g Webgates)
  • Global shared secret stored in the directory server only (not accessible to WebGate)
  • There is just one global shared secret key per OAM deployment which is used by all the WebGates
  • OAM 10g provides a proprietary multiple network domain SSO capability that predates Oracle Identity Federation. Complex configuration is required.
  • One Web server configuration supported per WebGate. Need to have multiple WebGates for multiple instances.

The Difference Between Access Manager 10g and 11g Webgates

Mark Wilcox - Thu, 2013-08-29 11:00

A common question we get is what is the difference between Access Manager 10g and Access Manager 11g webgates.

My colleague Yagnesh who covers webgates put together a simple list:

Here is 11g features:

  • Oracle Universal Installer for platform. Generic for all platforms
  • Host-based cookie
  • Individual WebGate OAMAuthnCookie_ making it more secure
  • A per agent key, and server key, are used. Agent key is stored in wallet file and Server key is stored in Credential store
  • One per-agent secret key shared between 11g WebGate and OAM Server One OAM Server key
  • OAM 11g supports cross-network-domain single sign-on out of the box. Oracle recommends you use Oracle Identity Federation for this situation.
  • Capability to act as a detached credential collector
  • Webgate Authorization Caching
  • Diagnostic page to tune parameters
  • Has separate install and configuration option. Hence, single install and multiple instance configuration is supported.

And 10g:

  • InstallShield and One installer per platform
  • Domain-based cookie
  • ObSSOCookie (one for all 10g Webgates)
  • Global shared secret stored in the directory server only (not accessible to WebGate)
  • There is just one global shared secret key per OAM deployment which is used by all the WebGates
  • OAM 10g provides a proprietary multiple network domain SSO capability that predates Oracle Identity Federation. Complex configuration is required.
  • One Web server configuration supported per WebGate. Need to have multiple WebGates for multiple instances.

Fresh, Informative and Fun - Join Us For Your Opening Presentation at Open World 2013

Mark Wilcox - Thu, 2013-08-29 09:25

Join us on Monday September 23, 2013 for Senior Vice President Amit Jasuja's presentation.

It's called "CON8808 - Oracle Identity Management: Enabling Business Growth in the New Economy".

The title is boring but the presentation will be fresh, informative and fun.

This is our annual presentation to share our thoughts on where the world is going in terms of identity management and letting customers who are leading the way let you know how they are getting there.

And we will deliver this to you in a way that promises to be as entertaining as it is informative.

Click here and schedule yourself for Amit's session before we run out of room

Fresh, Informative and Fun - Join Us For Your Opening Presentation at Open World 2013

Mark Wilcox - Thu, 2013-08-29 09:25

Join us on Monday September 23, 2013 for Senior Vice President Amit Jasuja's presentation.

It's called "CON8808 - Oracle Identity Management: Enabling Business Growth in the New Economy".

The title is boring but the presentation will be fresh, informative and fun.

This is our annual presentation to share our thoughts on where the world is going in terms of identity management and letting customers who are leading the way let you know how they are getting there.

And we will deliver this to you in a way that promises to be as entertaining as it is informative.

Click here and schedule yourself for Amit's session before we run out of room

Agile and UX can mix

Robert Baillie - Thu, 2013-08-29 05:19
User experience design is an agile developer's worst nightmare. You want to make a change to a system, so you research. You collect usage stats, you analyse hotspots, you review, you examine user journeys, you review, you look at drop off rates, you review. Once you've got enough data you start to design. You paper prototype, run through with users, create wireframes, run through with users, build prototypes, run through with users, do spoken journey and video analysis, iterate, iterate, iterate, until finally you have a design. Then you get the developers to build it, exactly as you designed it. Agile development, on the other hand, is a user experience expert's worst nightmare. You want to make a change to a system, so you decide what's the most important bit, and you design and build that - don't worry how it fits into the bigger picture, show it to the users, move on to the next bit, iterate, iterate, iterate, until finally you have a system. Then you get the user experience...

Agile and UX can mix

Rob Baillie - Thu, 2013-08-29 05:19
User experience design is an agile developer's worst nightmare. You want to make a change to a system, so you research. You collect usage stats, you analyse hotspots, you review, you examine user journeys, you review, you look at drop off rates, you review. Once you've got enough data you start to design. You paper prototype, run through with users, create wireframes, run through with users, build prototypes, run through with users, do spoken journey and video analysis, iterate, iterate, iterate, until finally you have a design.

Then you get the developers to build it, exactly as you designed it.

Agile development, on the other hand, is a user experience expert's worst nightmare. You want to make a change to a system, so you decide what's the most important bit, and you design and build that - don't worry how it fits into the bigger picture, show it to the users, move on to the next bit, iterate, iterate, iterate, until finally you have a system.

Then you get the user experience expert to fix all the clumsy workflows.

The two approaches are fundamentally opposed.

Aren't they?

Well, of course, I'm exaggerating for comic effect, but these impressions are only exaggerations - they're not complete fabrications.

If you look at what's going on, both approaches have the same underlying principle - your users don't know what they want until they see something. Only then do they have something to test their ideas against.  Both sides agree, the earlier you get something tangible in front of users and the more appropriate and successful the solution will be.

The only real difference in the two approaches as described is the balance between scope of design and fullness of implementation. On the UX side the favour is for maximum scope of design and minimal implementation; the agile side favours minimal scope of design and maximum implementation.

The trick is to acknowledge this difference and bring them closer together, or mitigate against the risks those differences bring.

Or, the put it another way, the main problem you have with combining these two approaches is the lead up time before development starts.

In the agile world some people would like to think that developing based on a whim is a great way to work, but the reality is different. Every story that is developed will have gone through some phase of analysis even in the lightest of light touch processes. Not least someone has decided that a problem needs fixing.  Even in the most agile of teams there needs to be some due diligence and prioritisation.

This happens not just at the small scale, but also when deciding which overarching areas of functionality to change. In some organisations there will be a project (not a dirty word), in some a phase, in others a sprint. Whatever its called it'll be a consistent set of stories that build up to be a fairly large scale change in the system. This will have gone through some kind of appraisal process, and rightly so.

Whilst I don't particularly believe in business cases, I do believe in due diligence.

It is in this phase, the research, appraisal and problem definition stage, that UX research can start without having a significant impact on the start-up time. Statistics can be gathered and evidence amassed to describe the problem that needs to be addressed. This can form a critical part of the argument to start work.

In fact, this research can become part the business-as-usual activities of the team and can be used to discover issues that need to be addressed. This can be as "big process" as you want it to be, just as long as you are willing, and have the resources to pick up the problems that you find, and that you have the agility to react to clear findings as quickly as possible. Basically, you need to avoid being in the situation where you know there's a problem but you can't start to fix it because your process states you need to finish your 2 month research phase.

When you are in this discovery phase there's nothing wrong with starting to feel out some possible solutions. Ideas that can be used to illustrate the problem and the potential benefits of addressing it. Just as long as the techniques you use do not result in high cost and (to reiterate) a lack of ability to react quickly.

Whilst I think its OK to use whatever techniques work for you, for me the key to keeping the reaction time down is to keep it lightweight.  That is, make sure you're always doing enough to find out what you need to know, but not so much that it takes you a long time to reach conclusions and start to address them. User surveys, spoken narrative and video recordings, all of which can be done remotely, can be done at any time, and once you're in the routine of doing them they needn't be expensive.   Be aware that large sample sets might improve the accuracy of your research, but they also slow you down.  Keep the groups small and focused - applicable to the size of team you have to analyse and react to the data. Done right, these groups can be used to continually scrutinise your system and uncover problems.

Once those problems are found, the same evidence can be used to guide potential solutions. Produce some quick lo-fi designs, present them to another (or the same, if you are so inclined) small group and wireframe the best ones to include in your argument to proceed.  I honestly believe that once you're in the habit, this whole process can be implemented in two or three weeks.

Having got the go ahead, you have a coherent picture of the problem and a solid starting point for you commence the full blown design work.  You can then move into a short, sharp and probably seriously intense design phase.

At all points, the design that you're coming up with is, of course, important. However, it's vital that you don't underestimate the value of the thinking process that goes into the design. Keep earlier iterations of the design, keep notes on why the design changed. This forms a reference document that you can use to remind yourself of the reasoning behind your design. This needn't be a huge formal tome; it could be as simple as comments in your wireframes, but an aide mémoire for the rationale behind where you are today is important.
In this short sharp design phase you need to make sure that you get to an initial conclusion quickly and that you bear in mind that this will almost certainly not be the design that you actually end up with.  This initial design is primarily used to illustrate the problem and the current thinking on the solution to the developers. It is absolutely not a final reference document.

As soon as you become wedded to a design, you lose the ability to be agile. Almost by definition, an agile project will not deliver exactly the functionality it set out deliver. Recognise this and ensure that you do the level of design appropriate to bring the project to life and no more.

When the development starts, the UX design work doesn't stop. This is where the ultimate design work begins - the point at which the two approaches start to meld.

As the developers start to produce work, the UX expert starts to have the richest material he could have - a real system. It is quite amazing how quickly an agile project can produce a working system that you are able to put in front of users, and there's nothing quite like a real system for investigating system design.

It's not that the wireframes are longer of use. In fact, early on the wireframes remain a vital, and probably only coherent view of the system and these should evolve as the project develops.  As elements in the system get built and more rigidly set the wireframes are updated to reflect them. As new problems and opportunities are discovered, the wireframes are used to explore them.

This process moves along in parallel to the BA work that's taking place on the project. As the customer team splits and prioritises the work, the UX expert turns their attention to the detail of their immediate problems, hand in hand with the BAs. The design that's produced is then used to explain the proposed solutions to the development team and act as a useful piece of reference material.

At this point the developers will often have strong opinions on the design of the solution, and these should obviously be heard. The advantage the design team now have is that they have a body of research and previous design directions to draw on, and a coherent complete picture against which these ideas (and often criticisms) can be scrutinised.  It's not that the design is complete, or final, it's that a valuable body of work has just been done, which can be drawn upon in order to produce the solution.

As you get towards the end of the project, more and more of the wireframe represents the final product.  At this point functionality can be removed from the wireframe in line with what's expected to be built.  In fact, this is true all the way through the project, it's just that people become more acutely aware of it towards the end.

This is a useful means of testing the minimum viable product. It allows you to check with the customer team how much can be taken away before you have a system that could not be released: a crucial tool in a truly agile project.  If you don't have the wireframes to show people, the description of functionality that's going to be in or out can be open to interpretation - which means it's open to misunderstanding.
Conclusion
It takes work to bring a UX expert into an agile project, and it takes awareness and honesty to ensure that you're not introducing a big-up-front design process that reduces your ability to react.

However, by keeping in mind some core principles - that you need to be able to throw and willing to throw work away, you should not become wedded to a design early on, you listen to feedback and react, you keep your level of work and techniques fit for the just-in-time problem that you need to solve right now - you can add four huge advantages to your project.

  • A coherent view and design that bind the disparate elements together into a complete system.
  • Expert techniques and knowledge that allow you to discover the right problems to fix with greater accuracy.
  • Design practices and investigative processes that allow you to test potential solutions earlier in the project (i.e. with less cost) than would otherwise be possible, helping ensure you do the right things at the right time.
  • Extremely expressive communication tools that allow you to describe the system you're going to deliver as that understanding changes through the project.

Do it right and you can do all this and still be agile.

Find Your Brilliance

Tim Tow - Wed, 2013-08-28 16:33
I’d like to interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to tell you about one my personal highlight's of Kscope 13 which was held back in June in New Orleans. Every year ODTUG announces who the keynote speaker will be well in advance of the conference. Most of the time, the speaker is a person of note; interesting, relevant, sometimes even inspiring. And then there are those times when, frankly, I’m not particularly interested in them or what they have to say. But this year was different. At the end of January, ODTUG announced that the Kscope 13 keynote speaker would be Doc Hendley.

Who is Doc Hendley, you ask? Well, from my perspective, Doc Hendley is one of the most inspiring and truly extraordinary individuals I’ve ever come across. And after meeting him and having the privilege of spending time with him in New Orleans, I’m proud and truly humbled to be able to call this man a friend. He is truly extraordinary, which is ironic when you consider that Doc thinks of himself as “just an ordinary, regular, everyday guy.”

Let me tell you, Doc is anything but. This is the story of how a boy who grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina saved thousands of lives all the way across the globe and in the process, proved to himself and everyone else that one person – even an ordinary regular everyday person - can do something extraordinary.

Doc was “just a bartender” and musician who worked and played in nightclubs in Raleigh, NC. In fact, bartending was the only job he’d ever had. But in his own words, he was “dying to make a difference in this world.” In 2003, standing behind the bar, he heard that polluted water kills more children globally than HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis combined, yet at that time, no one aware of this crisis.

So what did Doc do? In his words, "He got angry, he got pissed off, he took action." And he did it the only way he knew how. He tapped into the "marginalized people in his community, the bar crowd, the regulars"  – the people that everyone else said were too ordinary - to create Wine to Water, an organization that would take him to the site of the greatest humanitarian disaster in the world – Darfur, Sudan, and eventually to 9 other countries. Doc lived in Darfur for a year, and taught the locals how to clean their water and utilize their own resources to keep it clean.

Ordinary guy? I don’t think so.

I watched his TEDx talk on YouTube before going to Kscope13. I was so moved by what he’d done, so overwhelmed, and so energized, that I made everyone in my company watch it before the conference. I wanted every person who worked for me to hear what Doc had to say, and to understand how we all can change the world if we try.  I love Doc's commitment to his cause and I hope we remain friends for a long time to come.


I know my commitments don't allow me to travel the world helping others like Doc does on a regular basis, but that doesn't mean I can't help.  We decided that Applied OLAP could help support the efforts of Wine to Water and so I presented Doc with a $5,000 check as our small contribution. During his keynote speech, Doc demonstrated, again, how one person, one donation, can change the world. I’m pledging to find a way to make a difference in the world too.

After all, I’m a regular ordinary every day kind of guy too.

Categories: BI & Warehousing

Database 11.2.0.4 Patchset Released

Antonio Romero - Wed, 2013-08-28 14:06

The 11.2.0.4 database patchset was released today, checking twitterland you can see news is already out. Tom Kyte tweeted 'look what slipped into 11.2.0.4' amongst others. There will be a standalone OWB 11.2.0.4 image also based on the database 11.2.0.4 components coming soon so I am told.

Database 11.2.0.4 Patchset Released

Antonio Romero - Wed, 2013-08-28 14:06

The 11.2.0.4 database patchset was released today, checking twitterland you can see news is already out. Tom Kyte tweeted 'look what slipped into 11.2.0.4' amongst others. There will be a standalone OWB 11.2.0.4 image also based on the database 11.2.0.4 components coming soon so I am told.

How to Configure The SSL Certificate For Oracle Warehouse Builder Repository Browser

Antonio Romero - Tue, 2013-08-27 22:09

  The Repository Browser is a browser-based tool that generates reports from data stored in Oracle Warehouse Builder (OWB) repositories. It use OC4j as the web server. Users need to use HTTPS to access the web interface. ( HTTP on top of the SSL/TLS protocol)

If the Repository Browser Listener is running on a computer named owb_server, then typing the following address will start the Repository Browser:

   https://owb_server:8999/owbb/RABLogin.uix?mode=design

   or

   https://owb_server:8999/owbb/RABLogin.uix?mode=runtime


On the server side, the SSL certificate for the browser is required. Users can create it by themselves.

First, uses can user the JRE's util "keytool" to generate a keystore, name it keystore.jks.

For example: keytool -genkey -keyalg RSA -alias mykey -keystore keystore.jks -validity 2000 -storepass  welcome1

Please pay attention to the password of the store, it need to be the same as the credentials of keystoreadmin in the file called "system-jazn-data.xml".


If the password is not the same, the error message like "Keystore was tampered with, or password was incorrect" will be generated.


In order to change the credentials, there are two files you can edit.


  • http-web-site.xml: It is in the path of %OWB_HOME%/j2ee/config. The password is stored as clear text in the http-web-site.xml, Users can change it to fit the password they use to generate the keysotre. For the security reason, if users don't want to store clear text, they can use the point (->keystoreadmin) to point another file named system-jazn-data.xml.


  • system-jazn-data.xml: User can find "system-jazn-data.xml" in the %OWB_HOME%/j2ee/config. There is a entry in it called "keystoreadmin".  Password store in this file is encrypted password. The pointer mentioned above is pointing to this place. In order to change the password, you can edit "system-jazn-data.xml",  change the value "<credentials>" of the entry "keystoreadmin". Please added "!" in front of your password. For example, if you want to change the password to welcome,change it to <credentials>!welcome</credentials>

The next time OC4J reads "system-jazn-data.xml", it will rewrite the file with all passwords obfuscated and unreadable.(So  your clear text like "!welcome" will become encrypted password, something like '{903}dnHlnv/Mp892K8ySQan+zGTlvUDeFYyW'

How to Configure The SSL Certificate For Oracle Warehouse Builder Repository Browser

Antonio Romero - Tue, 2013-08-27 22:09

  The Repository Browser is a browser-based tool that generates reports from data stored in Oracle Warehouse Builder (OWB) repositories. It use OC4j as the web server. Users need to use HTTPS to access the web interface. ( HTTP on top of the SSL/TLS protocol)

If the Repository Browser Listener is running on a computer named owb_server, then typing the following address will start the Repository Browser:

   https://owb_server:8999/owbb/RABLogin.uix?mode=design

   or

   https://owb_server:8999/owbb/RABLogin.uix?mode=runtime


On the server side, the SSL certificate for the browser is required. Users can create it by themselves.

First, uses can user the JRE's util "keytool" to generate a keystore, name it keystore.jks.

For example: keytool -genkey -keyalg RSA -alias mykey -keystore keystore.jks -validity 2000 -storepass  welcome1

Please pay attention to the password of the store, it need to be the same as the credentials of keystoreadmin in the file called "system-jazn-data.xml".


If the password is not the same, the error message like "Keystore was tampered with, or password was incorrect" will be generated.


In order to change the credentials, there are two files you can edit.


  • http-web-site.xml: It is in the path of %OWB_HOME%/j2ee/config. The password is stored as clear text in the http-web-site.xml, Users can change it to fit the password they use to generate the keysotre. For the security reason, if users don't want to store clear text, they can use the point (->keystoreadmin) to point another file named system-jazn-data.xml.


  • system-jazn-data.xml: User can find "system-jazn-data.xml" in the %OWB_HOME%/j2ee/config. There is a entry in it called "keystoreadmin".  Password store in this file is encrypted password. The pointer mentioned above is pointing to this place. In order to change the password, you can edit "system-jazn-data.xml",  change the value "<credentials>" of the entry "keystoreadmin". Please added "!" in front of your password. For example, if you want to change the password to welcome,change it to <credentials>!welcome</credentials>

The next time OC4J reads "system-jazn-data.xml", it will rewrite the file with all passwords obfuscated and unreadable.(So  your clear text like "!welcome" will become encrypted password, something like '{903}dnHlnv/Mp892K8ySQan+zGTlvUDeFYyW'

Data Pump 12c – Pumping Data with the LOGTIME Parameter

alt.oracle - Tue, 2013-08-27 09:38
Since its release, Oracle Data Pump has been a worthy successor to the traditional exp/imp tools.  However, one area lacking with Data Pump has been something as simple as the ability to identify how long each step of a Data Pump job actually takes.  The log will show start time at the top of the log and end time at the bottom, but the time of execution for each step is a mystery.  Oracle 12c solves this problem with the LOGTIME parameter, which adds a timestamp to the execution of each step of the Data Pump job.  Here’s what it looks like without the parameter.

/home/oracle:test1:expdp altdotoracle/altdotoracle \
> directory=data_pump_dir dumpfile=expdp.dmp \
> tables=employee

Export: Release 12.1.0.1.0 - Production on Tue Aug 13 09:32:38 2013

Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates.  All rights reserved.

Connected to: Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.1.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options
Starting "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01":  altdotoracle/******** directory=data_pump_dir dumpfile=expdp.dmp tables=employee
Estimate in progress using BLOCKS method...
Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/TABLE_DATA
Total estimation using BLOCKS method: 64 KB
Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/TABLE
Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/STATISTICS/TABLE_STATISTICS
Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/STATISTICS/MARKER
. . exported "ALTDOTORACLE"."EMPLOYEE"                   10.93 KB      16 rows
Master table "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01" successfully loaded/unloaded
******************************************************************************
Dump file set for ALTDOTORACLE.SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01 is:
  /oracle/base/admin/test1/dpdump/expdp.dmp
Job "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01" successfully completed at Tue Aug 13 09:32:51 2013 elapsed 0 00:00:11

With the LOGTIME parameter, each step is prefixed with a timestamp, indicating the start time for each event that is processed.

/home/oracle:test1:expdp altdotoracle/altdotoracle \
> directory=data_pump_dir dumpfile=expdp.dmp \
> tables=employee LOGTIME=ALL

Export: Release 12.1.0.1.0 - Production on Tue Aug 13 09:34:54 2013

Copyright (c) 1982, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates.  All rights reserved.

Connected to: Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.1.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options
13-AUG-13 09:34:56.757: Starting "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01":  altdotoracle/******** directory=data_pump_dir dumpfile=expdp.dmp tables=employee LOGTIME=ALL
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.019: Estimate in progress using BLOCKS method...
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.364: Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/TABLE_DATA
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.396: Total estimation using BLOCKS method: 64 KB
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.742: Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/TABLE
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.894: Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/STATISTICS/TABLE_STATISTICS
13-AUG-13 09:34:57.964: Processing object type TABLE_EXPORT/TABLE/STATISTICS/MARKER
13-AUG-13 09:35:04.853: . . exported "ALTDOTORACLE"."EMPLOYEE"   10.93 KB      16 rows
13-AUG-13 09:35:05.123: Master table "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01" successfully loaded/unloaded
13-AUG-13 09:35:05.127: ******************************************************************************
13-AUG-13 09:35:05.128: Dump file set for ALTDOTORACLE.SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01 is:
13-AUG-13 09:35:05.131:   /oracle/base/admin/test1/dpdump/expdp.dmp
13-AUG-13 09:35:05.134: Job "ALTDOTORACLE"."SYS_EXPORT_TABLE_01" successfully completed at Tue Aug 13 09:35:05 2013 elapsed 0 00:00:09

The parameter works similarly with Data Pump Import.  Note that, although it is documented, the LOGTIME parameter is not described when you do a expdp help=y or impdp help=y command.

Categories: DBA Blogs

DBA or Developer?

Chet Justice - Mon, 2013-08-26 16:01
I've always considered myself a developer and a LOWER(DBA). I may have recovered perhaps one database and that was just a sandbox, nothing production worthy. I've built out instances for development and testing and I've installed the software a few hundred times, at least. I've done DBA-like duties, but I just don't think of myself that way. I'm a power developer maybe? Whatevs.

I'm sure it would be nearly impossible to come up with One True Definition of The DBA ™. So I won't.

I've read that Tom Kyte does not consider himself a DBA, but I'm not sure most people know that. From Mr. Kyte himself:



At the same conference, I asked Cary Millsap the same question:



I read Cary for years and always assumed he was a DBA. I mean, have you read his papers? Have you read Optimizing Oracle Performance? Performance? That's what DBAs do (or so I used to think)!

It was only after working with him at #kscope11 on the Building Better Software track that I learned otherwise.

Perhaps I'll make this a standard interview question in the future...

Semi-related discussions:

1. Application Developers vs. Database Developers
2. Application Developers vs. Database Developers: Part II
Categories: BI & Warehousing

IPython at Ohio LinuxFest 2013

Catherine Devlin - Mon, 2013-08-26 04:56

Are you signed up yet for Ohio LinuxFest on Sep. 13-15? I'll be there to present

IPython for non-Pythonistas Break out of your (bash) shell! IPython and the IPython Notebook have swept over the Python programming community, but they're not just for Python programmers - they make for high-powered shell replacements even with little to no Python knowledge. They'll also let you document your work and collaborate with others like never before. Find out how these beautiful tools can improve your daily Linux work!

At PyOhio, I argued that all Python programmers need IPython. At OLF, I'll make the case that non-Pythonistas need IPython, too. Perhaps my next talk will be "Even Your Cat Needs IPython".

Also at OLF, look for PyOhio's booth for info on next year's PyOhio, other Python events around the region, and general Python love!

Configuring ODBC to MySQL from Oracle

Barry McGillin - Sun, 2013-08-25 03:14
Sometimes people want to connect to MySQL from Oracle and copy table data between the databases.  You can do that with Oracle Hetrogenous Services via ODBC.  This post will show how to create an odbc connection to your MySQL database which is the first part of this.

For my example, I'm using unixODBC and its on the Oracle public yum repository
[root@localEL5 ~]$ yum install unixODBC
Loaded plugins: security
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
> Running transaction check
> Processing Dependency: libboundparam.so.1 for package: unixODBC-devel
> Processing Dependency: libesoobS.so.1 for package: unixODBC-devel
> Processing Dependency: libgtrtst.so.1 for package: unixODBC-devel
> Processing Dependency: libmimerS.so.1 for package: unixODBC-devel
> Processing Dependency: libnn.so.1 for package: unixODBC-devel
> Processing Dependency: libodbc.so.1 for package: unixODBC
.....
> Running transaction check
> Package unixODBC-devel.i386 0:2.2.11-10.el5 set to be updated
> Package unixODBC-libs.i386 0:2.2.11-10.el5 set to be updated
> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

================================================================================
Package Arch Version Repository Size
================================================================================
Updating:
unixODBC i386 2.2.11-10.el5 el5_latest 290 k
Installing for dependencies:
unixODBC-libs i386 2.2.11-10.el5 el5_latest 551 k
Updating for dependencies:
unixODBC-devel i386 2.2.11-10.el5 el5_latest 738 k

Transaction Summary
================================================================================
Install 1 Package(s)
Upgrade 2 Package(s)

Total download size: 1.5 M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
(1/3): unixODBC-2.2.11-10.el5.i386.rpm | 290 kB 00:02
(2/3): unixODBC-libs-2.2.11-10.el5.i386.rpm | 551 kB 00:04
(3/3): unixODBC-devel-2.2.11-10.el5.i386.rpm | 738 kB 00:17
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total 60 kB/s | 1.5 MB 00:26
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Finished Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Installing : unixODBC-libs 1/5
warning: /etc/odbcinst.ini created as /etc/odbcinst.ini.rpmnew
Updating : unixODBC 2/5
Updating : unixODBC-devel 3/5
Cleanup : unixODBC 4/5
Cleanup : unixODBC-devel 5/5

Dependency Installed:
unixODBC-libs.i386 0:2.2.11-10.el5

Updated:
unixODBC.i386 0:2.2.11-10.el5

Dependency Updated:
unixODBC-devel.i386 0:2.2.11-10.el5

Complete!
[root@localEL5 ~]$


Now make sure odbc connector is installed for MySQL. Again, we're using our friend yum to provide it


[root@localEL5 ~]$ yum install mysql-connector-odbc
Loaded plugins: security
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
There are unfinished transactions remaining. You might consider running yum-complete-transaction first to finish them.
The program yum-complete-transaction is found in the yum-utils package.
> Running transaction check
...
> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

=================================================================================================
Package Arch Version Repository Size
=================================================================================================
Installing:
mysql-connector-odbc i386 3.51.26r1127-2.el5 el5_latest 159 k
Installing for dependencies:
libtool-ltdl i386 1.5.22-7.el5_4 el5_latest 37 k

Transaction Summary
=================================================================================================
Install 2 Package(s)
Upgrade 0 Package(s)

Total download size: 196 k
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
(1/2): libtool-ltdl-1.5.22-7.el5_4.i386.rpm | 37 kB 00:04
(2/2): mysql-connector-odbc-3.51.26r1127-2.el5.i386.rpm | 159 kB 00:01
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total 21 kB/s | 196 kB 00:09
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Finished Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Installing : libtool-ltdl 1/2
Installing : mysql-connector-odbc 2/2

Installed:
mysql-connector-odbc.i386 0:3.51.26r1127-2.el5

Dependency Installed:
libtool-ltdl.i386 0:1.5.22-7.el5_4

Complete!
[root@localEL5 ~]$

Now lets  check driver locations and DSNs. Firstly we can check the installed drivers now in the file /etc/odbcinst.ini

# driver definitinions
#
#

# Included in the unixODBC package
[PostgreSQL]
Description = ODBC for PostgreSQL
Driver = /usr/lib/libodbcpsql.so
Setup = /usr/lib/libodbcpsqlS.so
FileUsage = 1


# Driver from the MyODBC package
# Setup from the unixODBC package
[MySQL]
Description = ODBC for MySQL
Driver = /usr/lib/libmyodbc.so
Setup = /usr/lib/libodbcmyS.so
FileUsage = 1

Then, we can specify a DSN to connect with in /etc/odbc.ini (Be careful here the option names are case sensitive.

[sakila-connector]
driver=MySQL
Database=sakila
Socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
User=root
Password=oracle
Finally, we can now check our dsn defined above.  We'll use iSQL from the unixODBC package here.
[oracle@Unknown-08:00:27:c8:2a:1c lib]$ isql -v sakila-connector
+---------------------------------------+
| Connected! |
| |
| sql-statement |
| help [tablename] |
| quit |
| |
+---------------------------------------+
Cool. When we get this we are connected via odbc to the DSN.  Now we can prove it by doing a show tables or something to prove its working.
NB: If you get an error at this stage asking for libraries, its likely you specified your Drivers incorrectly in the odbcinst.ini.
Now we have this working we can setup HS on the Oracle side.

People, Performance and Perception

TalentedApps - Sun, 2013-08-25 01:04

A commonly heard complaint: “My manager is a control-freak and practice micro-management. He asks for suggestions but provide them all himself. He doesn’t believe in imperfection and try to fit us into his unrealistic expectations.”

Perceiver believes that it is the reality but he might be just focusing on the aspects which reinforce his existing beliefs.  Your friends, co-workers or the society don’t know “a real you” but “they know you as they perceive you” as they always have perception about you.  But when most of the decision makers in an organization shares the same perception about someone than it doesn’t really matter what “reality is” as “perception becomes the reality”.Perception

It’s hard for an organization to get required contribution from an individual who is not able to accomplish his own goals within organization and in order to achieve your purpose you need to know that how people perceive you. Any undesired perception about you, your products or services will not go away if you deny its existence.

It‘s not possible for you to communicate with each perceiver to explain who you really are, in case you are not happy about it. But before you make any effort to change perception, you need to understand three critical factors which contribute to perception formation process. And they are:

  1. Your performance: How you perform in a given context contributes majorly towards perception about you. Initial performance is a foundation stone in this process and often takes a lot of effort to change, in case you want to change it later, for better.
  2. Your competitor’s performance: Comparison and competition are unavoidable and if you are afraid of them, then you really fear your own incompetence.  You need to know what your competitor’s are doing before they walk over you.
  3. Perceivers’ viewpoint:  You are dealing with humans and they are prone to mistakes and prejudices. It can go in your favor or against you. These people can be your customers, key influencers in your organization or anyone who is a stakeholder in your current or future endeavors.

You may want to manage one or more of these factors depending on your power of influence but at minimal you should always be in a position to improve your own performance.

If you don’t want to be defined by what you are not, if you want to feed your opportunities and starve your problems; you need to take charge to change perception about you and the time is now. But what if you have already tried your best and are fully convinced that perception about you is unchangeable? You are neither the first nor the last person to feel it, recharge your batteries and hit the trail again. New jobs are waiting to be done, new teams are waiting to be led and new ideas are waiting to be born…

Photo Credit: Unknown


Tagged: perception, performance

Configuring MySQL on EL5, Setting Passwords and Network Access

Barry McGillin - Sat, 2013-08-24 10:35
I find myself installing and running mysql of different versions in different places for different reasons all the time (well often enough to do it and not remember the little things that cost time when setting up)   Its with that in mind, I'm making notes for myself and you guys as well to help you along.

We use MySQL a lot with Oracle SQLDeveloper and many use SQLDeveloper to co-exist between MySQL and Oracle.

For most versions of Oracle Linux, we will install SQL Server from the Yum repository. If you dont have one set up you can configure one under /etc/yum.repos.d.  These notes for yum are a reference (blatant copy) from the Oracle Linux Admin guide
  1. As root, change directory to /etc/yum.repos.d.
    # cd /etc/yum.repos.d
  2. Use the wget utility to download the repository configuration file that is appropriate for your system.
    # wget http://public-yum.oracle.com/public-yum-release.repo
    For Oracle Linux 6, enter:
    # wget http://public-yum.oracle.com/public-yum-ol6.repo
    The /etc/yum.repos.d directory is updated with the repository configuration file, in this example, public-yum-ol6.repo.
  3. You can enable or disable repositories in the file by setting the value of the enabled directive to 1 or 0 as required.
Now we are ready to install MySQL. If you havent used yum before play with some of the options to list packages and switch repos as you need them.  Its a great tool saving us all lots of time with dependencies.

root@localEl5# yum install mysql-server
You can see if its installed by doing
root@localEl5> yum list mysql-server
Loaded plugins: security
el5_latest | 1.4 kB 00:00
Installed Packages
mysql-server.i386 5.0.95-5.el5_9 installed
root@localEl5>
You can then start it with
root@localEL5> /etc/init.d/mysqld start
and check its running by
root@localEL5> /etc/init.d/mysqld status

mysqld (pid 31298) is running...
In general, you can start mysql on the server without a server password in order to set one up for yourself. My one caveat here, is that all this is for development folks, some one with a security hat on will complain (bitterly).  I'm going to show you how to clear down all permissions so you can connect from any machine.
root@localEL5> /etc/init.d/mysqld stop
root@localEL5> /etc/init.d/mysqld status
root@localEL5> mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables &amp;
mysql -uroot
Now we are logged into mysql as root with no passwords.  We can check what users are here and what permissions they have. Now, in this case, I have 
mysql> select user, host, password from user; 
+-------+-------------+-------------------------------------------+
| user | host | password |
+-------+--------------+-------------------------------------------+
| root | localhost | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
| root | 192.168.1.201| *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
| barry | localhost | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
+-------+--------------+-------------------------------------------+

The first thing I want to do is to remove duplicate entries for my user
mysql> delete from user where user='root' and host ='192.168.1.201';
now we have
+-------+--------------+-------------------------------------------+
| user | host | password |
+-------+--------------+-------------------------------------------+
| root | localhost | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
| barry | localhost | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
+-------+--------------+-------------------------------------------+
Now, next I want to update the hosts to any host which is '%' in mysql

 mysql> update user set host='%';

which now gives me

+-------+------+-------------------------------------------+
| user | host | password |
+-------+------+-------------------------------------------+
| root | % | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
| barry | % | *2447D497B9A6A15F2776055CB2D1E9F86758182F |
+-------+------+-------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)


Now, if you want to change your passwords, make sure you do that now.  If you are on 5.1 and over secure_auth is set on and old passwords are off  by default. In my version 5.0, I need to set them to get new passwords and secure_auth which is default on all mysql clients now.  This is done in /etc/my.conf followed by a restart of mysql

old_passwords=0
secure-auth=1

mysql> update user set password=PASSWORD('oracle') where user='root';

lastly flush privileges and exit

mysql> flush privileges;

Lastly, I like my prompts to be informative so, You can also set this in your profile to setup your prompts.

export MYSQL_PS1="\u@\h [\d] > "

It'll give you a prompt like this when I log in with

root@localEl5> mysql -uroot -poracle -Dmysql

giving this prompt in mysql

root@localEL5 [mysql] >

Now, you are all set to connect from SQL Developer to the this instance.  We can also install the sample databases from http://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html

Pages

Subscribe to Oracle FAQ aggregator