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Primary key with Non Unique Index

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2018-01-23 14:46
Hi Team, I was just playing around with some stuff so thought sharing with you. My understanding for Primary key was that Oracle uses Unique Index to enforce primary key constraint on table's column to be unique. Below is the code that I tri...
Categories: DBA Blogs

@DATENOW()

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2018-01-23 14:46
We have a situation where the golden gate is used to replicate the source data into target ( both source and target are oracle 12c). on the target we have a column ( Target Timestamp) , primarily to track the date/time the a row is replicated. this ...
Categories: DBA Blogs

XMLTYPE null element behavior on 11gR2 vs 12.1/12.2

Tom Kyte - Tue, 2018-01-23 14:46
Hi Guys, I've just noticed inconsistency between behavior of conversion of object/collection data to XMLTYPE between 11g R2 and 12.1/12.2 database. Testcase: <code> create or replace type test_dummy_object as object ( id number, "name...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Three Advances That Will Finally Make Software Self-Healing, Self-Tuning, and Self Managing

OTN TechBlog - Tue, 2018-01-23 13:37

Three Advances That Will Finally Make Software Self-Healing, Self-Tuning, and Self Managing

Ever heard the adage that the operating cost of a given application is often 2x the app’s acquisition cost?  Or how about that bugs cost 100x more to fix in the production phase than during the requirements phase? Or that developers in DevOps environments are often spending over half their time tweaking the “Ops” portion, like CI/CD, instead of writing code?

Removing effort from the operating portion of the equation has long been a goal of IT, though actually doing so is difficult in traditional environments where visibility to the edge (say, end-user monitoring and server-side instrumentation) is low and where remediation (say, optimizing configuration parameters) is manual.  But change is on the horizon, thanks to three integrated capabilities provided by cloud platforms that can lead to autonomous, self-healing systems.  Those three capabilities are automatic instrumentation, machine learning-powered analytics, and integrated remediation.

Automatic Instrumentation: Closing the Visibility Gap

Cloud software platform providers like Oracle are working hard to make visibility and instrumentation simply a feature of the underlying platform, rather than requiring a separate effort.  What this means for developers is that as you write and deploy code, the platform automatically generates and delivers relevant activity and environment telemetry. 

For example, PaaS services such as Java Cloud Service, SOA Cloud Service, and Database Cloud Service automatically expose detailed telemetry both about their environments (instance-level telemetry) as well as the artifacts deployed in those environments (code-level telemetry) to management services such as Oracle Management Cloud, without any extra work by developers or operations personnel.

By generating and exposing instrumentation automatically, we can close the visibility gap that often exists today between developers (who know what they coded, but not necessarily about environment dependencies) and operations (who know about environment dependencies, but not about what was coded). 

2 views of automated telemetry, generated by Java Cloud Service and Integration Cloud Service and exposed in Oracle Management Cloud.

Image 1:  2 views of automated telemetry, generated by Java Cloud Service and Integration Cloud Service and exposed in Oracle Management Cloud.

Machine Learning-Based Analytics

Having the relevant telemetry is a required first step, but understanding it is no easy task.  We’re talking about terabytes of logs, tens of thousands of activity and configuration metrics, in an environment where neither developers nor operators understand the dependencies among components. After all, we’ve happily given up a level of control in cloud in exchange for the ability to iterate faster. 

Fortunately, we no longer have to rely on our human faculties to deal with this data overload – we can instead rely on purpose-built machine learning (ML).  ML loves data.  The more the better. And ML that is designed specifically for the operations problem is able to intuit pretty interesting things out of this data, such as how applications are built (topology, dependencies) and how they should behave (baselining, anomaly detection, forecasting) – without any effort from developers. 

So, instead of a human having to program a monitoring regime to tell how something ought to work, the monitoring regime tells the humans how the application actually works, how it should work in the future, and why it may not be working as it should.  In this scenario, root-cause analysis becomes automated, capacity-planning becomes continuous, dependency-mapping just happens, and alerts/events only bubble up when they actually require attention.

Oracle Management Cloud’s ML portfolio provides topology-aware diagnostics that can forecast impending problems or identify root-cause of current problems without any operator knowledge of the systems being managed. 

Machine learning-based topology views are generated automatically by Oracle Management Cloud.

Image 2:  Machine learning-based topology views generated automatically by Oracle Management Cloud.

Automated Remediation: The Final Step

So now that we have all the data we need to understand what’s going on, and have the ability to analyze it in real-time using machine learning to understand why and what we should do about it, we can move toward the final step:  taking action. 

Automated remediation is the most visible aspect of self-healing systems, but in a sense it’s also the oldest.  API-based and script-based automation options have existed for most technical platforms for a long time and are wildly under-utilized.  The problem in most IT organizations is not can they automate something, it’s should they run that particular automation at a given time.  Sure, I can spin up a new VM, or clone the microservice – but should I?  Will it solve the problem or prevent another problem?

Put simply, for automation to be more heavily-utilized, we need to be better at answering the “should I?” question.  Fortunately, since we’ve now taken care of having better telemetry data and the ability to analyze it, we can link our analytic results directly to automation, at the platform level.  For example, Oracle Management Cloud can automatically invoke automation regimes such as Chef and Puppet, or Cloud Service APIs, in response to analytic conclusions.

Automated remediation is part of Oracle Management Cloud.

Image 3:  Automated remediation in Oracle Management Cloud

Autonomous Software Isn’t Magic

Variability and complexity in software environments is inevitable.  We have urgent business pressures to innovate and an increasingly sophisticated portfolio of loosely coupled cloud platforms on which to innovate.  However, unless we take steps to remove the downstream operational effort associated with the increase in variability and complexity, we will be dragged into spending ever-more time and energy on operations rather than development, and that 2x ratio may quickly become 5x or 10x. 

Self-healing, self-tuning, and self-managing aren’t “magic.” Rather, they are the by-design outputs of a platform that first auto-generates sufficient instrumentation, then provides that instrumentation to an ML-based analytic engine, and finally uses the analytic results to invoke the proper automation.  Given the pace of business change, these aren’t just cool features of a platform, they are absolute necessities for sustainable modern application development.  And they are here, now. 

We invite you to experience just what autonomous PaaS is like at cloud.oracle.com/tryit

EBS 12.2 + Maximum Availability Architecture White Paper Now Available

Steven Chan - Tue, 2018-01-23 11:15

Whether Oracle E-Business Suite is deployed in the Cloud or on-premises, planning for and implementing strategies for high availability and disaster recovery are paramount. A new white paper is available that applies the principles of Oracle's Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) to the Oracle E-Business Suite 12.2 infrastructure:

The major difference between the methods described here for Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12.2 and those documented elsewhere for earlier EBS releases is the use of logical host names instead of physical host names in the EBS managed topology. This allows us to make the configuration of the standby site the same as the primary site, from an Oracle E-Business Suite perspective, thus allowing you to switch between the two sites with minimal configuration efforts and facilitating a reduction in downtime as compared to using physical host names.

This whitepaper covers:

  • Overview of Oracle's engineered systems: Exadata and Exalogic
  • Technology components in Oracle Database MAA, including:
    • Real Application Clusters and Oracle Clusterware
    • Oracle Data Guard
    • Oracle Flashback Database 
    • Oracle Automatic Storage Management 
    • Oracle Recovery Manager and Oracle Secure Backup
  • EBS technology components in MAA, including:
    • Parallel Concurrent Processing (PCP)
    • Multiple load-balanced application tier services
    • Online Patching and Edition-based Redefinition
    • Logical host names
    • Fusion Middleware Administration Server
  • ​EBS Configuration best practices
    • ​OS Role separation
    • Database initialization parameters
    • Linux HugePages
    • Backups of Database Oracle Homes
    • Database password expiration
    • Exadata Fast Node Death Detection
    • Timeouts for RAC Node Failures
    • Flashback Database implementation 
    • Exadata Smart Flash Logging
    • Exadata Smart Flash Cache
    • Exadata memory management 
    • Oracle Advanced Compression
    • Exadata Log Writer tuning
    • Fixed object statistics
    • Exadata I/O Resource Manager
    • Oracle Engineered Systems best practices and health check
  • And much more!

This white paper is mandatory reading for EBS architects and system administrators designing a business continuity or disaster recovery strategy and architecture.

Related Articles

Categories: APPS Blogs

Leader Grupo Martí Deploys Suite of Oracle Retail Technology, Improving Customer Experience

Oracle Press Releases - Tue, 2018-01-23 09:58
Press Release
Leader Grupo Martí Deploys Suite of Oracle Retail Technology, Improving Customer Experience A Leading Provider of Sporting Goods in Mexico Gains Single View of Inventory and Operations

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Jan 23, 2018

Today, Oracle announced that a leading provider of sporting goods in Mexico, Grupo Martí has deployed Oracle Retail technology to make goods available to consumers in stores faster. As part of their implementation project, Grupo Martí has implemented Oracle Retail Merchandise operations management suite, Oracle Retail Store Inventory Management and Oracle Retail Allocation. With Oracle Retail at the core, Grupo Martí can enhance inventory control to drive better merchandise decision-making and improve the experience for consumers, helping ensure the right products are in the right stores at the right time.

Grupo Martí operates over 200 stores under seven brands including: Tiendas Martí, Martí Outlet, Martí Digital, Clubes Sport City, Restaurantes City Café, Emoción Deportiva and Smart Fit. As a leading sporting goods retailer in Mexico, Grupo Martí’s business model is highly dependent on managing large volumes of inventory. Prior to deploying Oracle Retail, Grupo Martí was managing merchandise through their ERP system, but found that it could not scale to meet the demand of today’s omnichannel environment. Grupo Martí started an evaluation of solutions to support retail business with minimal operational changes. Grupo Martí selected Oracle Retail for their ability to deliver an easy to implement solution with breadth, depth and retail rich business capabilities for a modern, digital organization. Retail Consult, Oracle PartnerNetwork Platinum level member, was a key player in the success of the Martí Lombardi project.

“One of the most important outcomes of the project was simplifying our business processes with a flexible and powerful tool – made possible with a seasoned implementation partner. The combination of Oracle Retail solutions with Retail Consult skills helped to empower the Martí team and made the project viable.” said Alejandro Oropeza, CIO of Grupo Martí.

As a result of a successful implementation with Retail Consult and Oracle Retail, Grupo Martí is experiencing positive impacts in budget optimization, order tracking, vendor communications, as well as allocation of products in the right sizes, colors and quantities to stores. Accelerated purchase process and optimized product delivery is key: historically it had taken three to four months to get products into stores and this can now be accomplished in a matter of weeks. Martí’s information is now organized to provide better visibility to make more informed decisions that impact operations and inventory.

“Martí immediately noticed positive results, due to more efficient processes, control, and visibility. Budget optimization, order tracking, and vendor communications have all improved,” said Manuel Martin, CEO, Grupo Martí. “From day one, we experienced an accelerated purchasing process to get the right product into our stores in weeks instead of months.”

"The Oracle Retail suite of solutions was a perfect fit for Grupo Martí because they needed broad, Retail-specific functionality that could be implemented quickly and integrated with their existing ERP system.  As well, Oracle's technology platform has rich capabilities that make the integrations easy to implement and help keep them protected for future upgrades,” said Silvia Gomes, partner, Retail Consult. “With Oracle, we are confident that we can deliver all aspects of a client's solution to make them successful."

“Offering the right product, at the right moment, in the right time is key for driving loyalty. Inventory control is crucial to offer consistent customer shopping experience and engagement,” said Ray Carlin, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Oracle Retail. “We are seeing sports retailers worldwide looking for improving their operations and we are proud to work with Grupo Martí in Mexico in this transformational journey.”

Contact Info
Matt Torres
Oracle
415-595-1584
matt.torres@oracle.com
About Oracle Retail

Oracle provides retailers with a complete, open, and integrated suite of best-of-breed business applications, cloud services, and hardware that are engineered to work together and empower commerce. Leading fashion, grocery, and specialty retailers use Oracle solutions to anticipate market changes, simplify operations and inspire authentic brand interactions. For more information, visit our website at www.oracle.com/retail.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers complete SaaS application suites for ERP, HCM and CX, plus best-in-class database Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) from data centers throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information about Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Matt Torres

  • 415-595-1584

SoapUI: validate a date field in response with current date

Darwin IT - Tue, 2018-01-23 09:30
Once in a while you need to validate a service that has dates in the response. Although SoapUI has xpath and xquery match assertions, validate against strings is quite difficult. How to do a date comparison against for instance the current date?

You can do it with a script assertion:
And the content of this can be:
def groovyUtils = new com.eviware.soapui.support.GroovyUtils(context)
// Set Namespaces
def holder = groovyUtils.getXmlHolder(messageExchange.responseContent)
//holder.namespaces["soapenv"] = "http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
def dateFoundStr = holder.getNodeValue("/Results/ResultSet/Row[1]/DATE_FOUND")
def dateFound = new Date().parse("yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss", dateFoundStr)
dateFoundStr = dateFound.format("yyyy-MM-dd")
//Current Date
def date = new Date()
def currentDate=date.format("yyyy-MM-dd")
//
assert dateFoundStr == currentDate

First we need to fetch and parse the response content using the holder variable, parsing the messageExchange.responseContent using groovyUtils.getXmlHolder.

Second, the particular date is found, here dateFound as a field from a JDBC response. A JDBC response does not have namespaces, but from a SOAP response it helps to declare namespaces. For an example see the commented line for holder.namespaces["soapenv"].

Third, I parse the found date, which is a string as fetched from the xml, to a date time, then format it to a string to get only the date part. This could be done simply using substring methods, but I wanted to try this. And get and formatthe currentDate as a string.

In the end just do assert with a comparison of both values.

There you go.

GRDF Begins World’s Largest Gas Smart Meter Roll-out Underpinned by Oracle Technology

Oracle Press Releases - Tue, 2018-01-23 08:00
Press Release
GRDF Begins World’s Largest Gas Smart Meter Roll-out Underpinned by Oracle Technology Leading French gas distributor will deliver smart metering to 11 million users by 2022, with the help of Oracle Utilities Meter Data Management

DistribuTECH, San Antonio, TX.—Jan 23, 2018

Leading French distribution system operator (DSO), GRDF, launched the world’s largest roll-out of smart gas meters, powered by Oracle technology in May 2017. GRDF, which serves 90% of France’s gas market, has selected Oracle Utilities Meter Data Management to help it deliver smart metering services to 11 million customers as part of its gas smart meters programme. 

The announcement follows an 18 month trial, which received regulatory approval from the French government in April 2017. GRDF has now begun the full-scale replacement of its 11 million mechanical meters with new smart devices. GRDF’s project is one step toward achieving this end. Its aim is to replace all current gas meters within 5 years. This large-scale industrial program will benefit customers and cities by boosting their energy efficiency.

Using Oracle Utilities Meter Data Management (MDM), GRDF is currently upgrading the natural gas transmission network to make it an effective tool for the energy transition. Eventually, it will be digitized and connected to provide four major features: integrating locally-produced renewable gas, improving safety and performance for the natural gas supply, providing customers and cities with data they can use in their efforts to manage energy demand and creating bridges to other networks so that they can take advantage of the storage capacity and flexibility of the natural gas network. In anticipation of the clean energy package, the transition to smart metering will also help GRDF respond to new European regulation.

Edouard Sauvage, CEO at GRDF said “replacing 11 million mechanical meters with smart devices takes more than just a new IT infrastructure. This is a major transformation for GRDF and for France, and we needed a technology partner that could help us to continue delivering the highest standard of service to our customers.”

Rodger Smith, general manager and senior vice president for Oracle Utilities said “the French gas market has a clear roadmap for the transition to digital service delivery and the move to smart metering is an integral part of this evolution. The configurability and strength of Oracle Meter Data Management make it ideally suited to that end. With this roll-out and its investment in Oracle, GRDF is setting a new tone for the relationship between French utilities, their customers and the network.”

Contact Info
Valerie Beaudett
Oracle Corporation
+1 650.400.7833
valerie.beaudett@oracle.com
Daniel Argintaru
CMGRP for Oracle
+44 (0) 844 875 1455
OracleIndustries@CMGRP.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers complete SaaS application suites for ERP, HCM and CX, plus best-in-class database Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) from data centers throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information about Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

About GRDF

GRDF is the leading manager of natural gas transmission networks in France, GRDF distributes natural gas each day to more than 11 million customers to ensure that they have gas when they need it, regardless of their supplier. This convenient, affordable, comfortable, and modern source of energy enables people to heat their homes, cook, and get around. To provide this public service, GRDF builds, operates, and maintains the largest transmission network in Europe (198,886 km) and develops it in more than 9,500 municipalities while ensuring the safety of people and property, as well as high-quality distribution.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Valerie Beaudett

  • +1 650.400.7833

Daniel Argintaru

  • +44 (0) 844 875 1455

Oracle Utilities’ New Low Voltage Network Management Capability Provides Instant Visibility into Low Voltage, Secondary Mesh, Underground Networks

Oracle Press Releases - Tue, 2018-01-23 08:00
Press Release
Oracle Utilities’ New Low Voltage Network Management Capability Provides Instant Visibility into Low Voltage, Secondary Mesh, Underground Networks Oracle Utilities’ Innovative Network Management System now features out-of-the-box low voltage capability

DistribuTECH, San Antonio, TX.—Jan 23, 2018

Oracle Utilities today announced that it has added unique, low voltage network management capabilities to its Oracle Utilities Network Management System, providing distribution network operators with increased visibility and management of low voltage, secondary mesh, underground networks. Oracle Utilities is one of the only providers offering detailed analysis and modeling capabilities that are available out-of-the-box.

While utility distribution operators have had visibility into their high and medium voltage networks, they haven’t had the same level of near real-time operational visibility into the underground low voltage, and secondary mesh networks used in many cities.

Oracle understands that the historically high reliability and inherent redundancy of the underground networks meant that operator visibility was not a high priority. Today, however, utilities are seeing more disruptions and failures in downtown underground low voltage/secondary networks due to aging infrastructure and the addition of intermittent distributed renewable resources at the edge of the grid.

For cities, visibility is becoming an increasingly important consideration in order to continue to improve reliability. One major North American city, for example, has a vast underground distribution network that carries 86 percent of the total load via low voltage, secondary lines. This level of visibility is just as important for smaller city networks. Many European and Asian utilities also carry electricity to customers via extensive low voltage networks that typically don’t have the visibility and accountability of HV or MV networks. In the dynamic network of the future, visibility is becoming almost a requirement and added priority alongside reliability and redundancy.

The new Low Voltage Network Management capability in the Oracle Utilities Network Management System provides modeling, analysis and ongoing management and optimization of complex mesh and low voltage networks, helping operators monitor faults and resolve them in an automated fashion. By better modeling and managing these networks, utilities can manage the low voltage edge of the grid as part of their core operations, enabling them to: reduce recurring crew visits for fault and outage resolution; better forecast load and plan accordingly; help identify which assets are approaching the end of their lifecycle and need to be replaced; and improve overall system reliability and customer satisfaction.

“Underground low voltage network assets continue to age, and their reliability and resiliency has been further challenged by the inherent intermittency of distributed energy resources. As utilities strive to place a strong emphasis on customer-centricity, these new challenges are creating a dire need for more visibility, control and proactive maintenance and optimization of low voltage networks. Oracle Utilities Low Voltage Network Management capability is unique in its ability to respond to these needs, agnostically, either within our Oracle Utilities Network Management  Solution or alongside others’ distribution management products,” said Rodger Smith, general manager and senior vice president, Oracle Utilities.

“As we continue to see more disruptions and failures in underground low voltage secondary networks in cities around the globe, the need for near real-time visibility into network performance is becoming more critical. Oracle Utilities is in a unique position to provide such detailed low voltage network management visibility which will enable utilities to provide a safe, secure and reliable power supply for years to come and to increase flexibility to support growth in their cities,” said John Villali, Research Director for IDC Energy Insights.

Contact Info
Valerie Beaudett
Oracle Corporation
+1 650.400.7833
valerie.beaudett@oracle.com
Christina McDonald
Burson-Marsteller
+1 212.614.4221
christina.mcdonald@bm.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers complete SaaS application suites for ERP, HCM and CX, plus best-in-class database Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) from data centers throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information about Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Valerie Beaudett

  • +1 650.400.7833

Christina McDonald

  • +1 212.614.4221

Histograms

Jonathan Lewis - Tue, 2018-01-23 01:58

I had a sudden urge to go a bit meta – so here’s a relative frequency histogram of my observations of the general use of histograms in Oracle:

histogram_histogram

 

Merge statement failing when selecting from dual

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
Hi Tom, How do i make use of the query in the ref cursor inside a merge statement. in the "ON" condition it says "Src.column_name " is an invalid identifier. <code> create or replace PROCEDURE TingTong ( in_tax_year IN tdir_le...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Optimizer choosing Index Full Scan over Index Fast Full Scan

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
Per Connor's request, I asked our DBA to generate the trace files and sent them to the asktom_us e-mail address. Thanks. Alfred ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Hello, I have observed in an Ora...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Tables with no tablespace

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
Hi Tom, This may sound a little silly question but have not come across such situation yet. I have few tables create by user (not owned by sys or system) which do not have tablespace name. The following query returns table names. select ...
Categories: DBA Blogs

ORA-14300 on Interval partition

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
Team, We have an application, where we receive a set of files to be processed by application in 24/7. Each time a file recieves we generate a file_key in master_table using sequence, and take that file_key to load the file contents into this tab...
Categories: DBA Blogs

SQL*Loader-510: Physical record size limit

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
Dear Tom, I tried to load a text file to Oracle db using SQL*Loader. Here is the table definition: create table mytable ( key varchar2(40), adate date, atag number(10), aclob clob, version number(10) ); Here is...
Categories: DBA Blogs

Query not working in Oracle , Missing expression error

Tom Kyte - Mon, 2018-01-22 20:46
i want to get column 2 of y table if column 1 of y table is equal to column 1 of z table this query working in mysql but,this query not working in oracle am getting missing expression error....can u please help me to sort this issue
Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle SOA Suite 12c: Configuring the SOA Suite Weblogic Server

Dietrich Schroff - Mon, 2018-01-22 14:45
After
 i had to run the
./config.shinside the home/oracle/Oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/oracle_common/common/bin

















And then after a
./startWeblogic.shinside /bin in the directory, which was configured in the first screenshot of the config.sh, i can open the console:


Open Source Resolutions: 3 Ways To Simplify, Break Free, and Focus in 2018

OTN TechBlog - Mon, 2018-01-22 11:00

For developers, development teams, and DevOps organizations, 2017 brought forward a growing stack of open source technologies that were proven out by early adopter cloud teams. Those technologies are now being rapidly mainstreamed thanks to some heavy lifting by the CNCF and the broader cloud native community. So now is the time to resolve to make three powerful changes for 2018!

1. Simplify Your Life

So you’ve been experimenting with open source technologies from Docker to Kubernetes to Istio.  Perhaps you’ve stood these up locally on your laptop, in your lab, or experimentally up on AWS. Congratulations, this is a great first step! But trust me, keeping that environment up and running, updated with the latest releases and patches, and scaled to meet the needs of your broader organization is painful, expensive, time consuming, and foolish, considering that cloud providers are now offering managed services that do that for you – typically for no more than the cost of your current infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources (compute, storage, network). 2017 should be the last year we give out “I Stood Up My Own Kubernetes” participation trophies.  There’s no reason in 2018 to spend valuable developer and DevOps time running and maintaining your own open source platforms when cloud providers are doing the work for you in a secure, cost-effective package. There are plenty of better ways to differentiate, compete, expand your skills, and grow your career in 2018 – building, running, and maintaining your own open source based platform is not one of them. Move to a managed open source-based service in 2018 and simplify your life.  You’ll thank me later!

2. Declare Your Independence:

Break Free From Cloud Lock-In

Take a self-inventory of the cloud providers your org uses and how much money you spent on them in 2017 versus 2016. My guess is that you will find you are developing a significant business and technical risk exposure based on single vendor cloud lock-in. Open source technologies actually give you leverage to choose the cloud vendor that works best for you from a cost, use-case, technical, and/or business perspective. In particular, serverless has been one of the big remaining closed and proprietary cloud native technology areas to date. This has forced enterprises to choose between cloud lock-in or adopting early service tools like AWS Lambda. That’s all about to change in 2018 as a set of open serverless projects (e.g., http://FnProject.io/ ) and CNCF efforts move forward. “Open on Open” is the only way to move open serverless forward in 2018 — building serverless solutions on an integrated stack on top of a Kubernetes foundation.  So, 2018 is the year to ditch lock-in and break free from your captive cloud situation. Don’t be a prisoner in your own cloud. 

3. Focus on What Matters:

Imagine if all cloud providers offered the same core set of open source-based services (e.g., Docker, Kubernetes, Kafka, Cassandra, etc.), and the only cost was for the IaaS resources you used. If this were true, then you could focus on choosing a solution based on what really matters to you.  Hey, that is true now!  The market moved in 2017 from a seller’s market to a buyer’s market with all the major cloud vendors offering similar, core OSS-based services — at least on the surface. The difference now comes down to what matters to you. And in particular the “ilities” like scalability, security, availability, reliability, and usability become key differentiators to consider. Often that can be described as “enterprise-grade” or “open source for grownups.” Open source can be free and fun, but when you need to run your enterprise apps on it, you’ll want to go top-shelf and reach for the good stuff — and that’s where the “ilities” come in.  In 2018, focus on what really matters to you, be an informed buyer, and ask the hard questions when it comes to running your apps on these infrastructures.

Open source technologies are already making developer’s lives better and their projects healthier. Now it’s time to simplify your life with managed services versus going down the DIY “hard way” path.  Break free from cloud lock-in and declare your independence from captive clouds.  And finally, in 2018 focus on what matters to you when it comes to choosing a cloud service — now that the playing field is evening out in your favor.  And most of all, have a spectacular 2018!

Open Source Resolutions: 3 Ways To Simplify, Break Free, and Focus in 2018

OTN TechBlog - Mon, 2018-01-22 11:00

For developers, development teams, and DevOps organizations, 2017 brought forward a growing stack of open source technologies that were proven out by early adopter cloud teams. Those technologies are now being rapidly mainstreamed thanks to some heavy lifting by the CNCF and the broader cloud native community. So now is the time to resolve to make three powerful changes for 2018!

1. Simplify Your Life

So you’ve been experimenting with open source technologies from Docker to Kubernetes to Istio.  Perhaps you’ve stood these up locally on your laptop, in your lab, or experimentally up on AWS. Congratulations, this is a great first step! But trust me, keeping that environment up and running, updated with the latest releases and patches, and scaled to meet the needs of your broader organization is painful, expensive, time consuming, and foolish, considering that cloud providers are now offering managed services that do that for you – typically for no more than the cost of your current infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources (compute, storage, network). 2017 should be the last year we give out “I Stood Up My Own Kubernetes” participation trophies.  There’s no reason in 2018 to spend valuable developer and DevOps time running and maintaining your own open source platforms when cloud providers are doing the work for you in a secure, cost-effective package. There are plenty of better ways to differentiate, compete, expand your skills, and grow your career in 2018 – building, running, and maintaining your own open source based platform is not one of them. Move to a managed open source-based service in 2018 and simplify your life.  You’ll thank me later!

2. Declare Your Independence:

Break Free From Cloud Lock-In

Take a self-inventory of the cloud providers your org uses and how much money you spent on them in 2017 versus 2016. My guess is that you will find you are developing a significant business and technical risk exposure based on single vendor cloud lock-in. Open source technologies actually give you leverage to choose the cloud vendor that works best for you from a cost, use-case, technical, and/or business perspective. In particular, serverless has been one of the big remaining closed and proprietary cloud native technology areas to date. This has forced enterprises to choose between cloud lock-in or adopting early service tools like AWS Lambda. That’s all about to change in 2018 as a set of open serverless projects (e.g., http://FnProject.io/ ) and CNCF efforts move forward. “Open on Open” is the only way to move open serverless forward in 2018 — building serverless solutions on an integrated stack on top of a Kubernetes foundation.  So, 2018 is the year to ditch lock-in and break free from your captive cloud situation. Don’t be a prisoner in your own cloud. 

3. Focus on What Matters:

Imagine if all cloud providers offered the same core set of open source-based services (e.g., Docker, Kubernetes, Kafka, Cassandra, etc.), and the only cost was for the IaaS resources you used. If this were true, then you could focus on choosing a solution based on what really matters to you.  Hey, that is true now!  The market moved in 2017 from a seller’s market to a buyer’s market with all the major cloud vendors offering similar, core OSS-based services — at least on the surface. The difference now comes down to what matters to you. And in particular the “ilities” like scalability, security, availability, reliability, and usability become key differentiators to consider. Often that can be described as “enterprise-grade” or “open source for grownups.” Open source can be free and fun, but when you need to run your enterprise apps on it, you’ll want to go top-shelf and reach for the good stuff — and that’s where the “ilities” come in.  In 2018, focus on what really matters to you, be an informed buyer, and ask the hard questions when it comes to running your apps on these infrastructures.

Open source technologies are already making developer’s lives better and their projects healthier. Now it’s time to simplify your life with managed services versus going down the DIY “hard way” path.  Break free from cloud lock-in and declare your independence from captive clouds.  And finally, in 2018 focus on what matters to you when it comes to choosing a cloud service — now that the playing field is evening out in your favor.  And most of all, have a spectacular 2018!

The chaotic politics of privacy

DBMS2 - Mon, 2018-01-22 09:23

Almost nobody pays attention to the real issues in privacy and surveillance. That’s gotten only slightly better over the decade that I’ve written about the subject. But the problems with privacy/surveillance politics run yet deeper than that.

Worldwide

The politics of privacy and surveillance are confused, in many countries around the world. This is hardly surprising. After all:

  • Privacy involves complex technological issues. Few governments understand those well.
  • Privacy also involves complex business issues. Few governments understand those well either.
  • Citizen understanding of these issues is no better.

Technical cluelessness isn’t the only problem. Privacy issues are commonly framed in terms of civil liberties, national security, law enforcement and/or general national sovereignty. And these categories are inherently confusing, in that:

  • Opinions about them often cross standard partisan lines.
  • Different countries take very different approaches, especially in the “civil liberties” area.
  • These categories are rife with questionably-founded fears, such as supposed threats from terrorism, child pornographers, or “foreign interference”.

Data sovereignty regulations — which are quite a big part of privacy law — get their own extra bit of confusion, because of the various purposes they can serve. Chief among these are: 

  • Preventing foreign governments or businesses from impinging citizens’ privacy.
  • Helping their own governments impinge on citizens’ privacy.
  • Providing a pretext to favor local companies at the expense of foreign ones.

The United States

Specifically in the United States, I’d like to drill into two areas:

  • An important bit of constitutional confusion.
  • Just how bipartisan this all gets in our generally hyper-partisan times.

The constitutional confusion goes something like this:

  • A new communication technology is invented, such as telephones or email.
  • The courts rule that there is no Fourth Amendment expectation of privacy in using such optional services, because:
    • Given how the technology works, the information is temporarily under a third party’s control.
    • If you weren’t willing to give up your privacy, you wouldn’t have used the technology in the first place.
  • Later the technology becomes so central to everyday life that courts start finding the previous reasoning to be inaccurate, and extend the Fourth’s protection of your “papers and effect” to the new communication medium.
  • In the meantime, laws are passed regulating privacy for that particular medium.

For example:

Those links are all to Wikipedia. At the time of this writing, the ones on Warshak and the SCA go into considerable constitutional depth.

The Email Privacy Act is also the single best example of this post’s premises about the general chaos of privacy politics.

  • It passed the House of Representatives unanimously in 2016 — 419-0 — which is an honor usually reserved for such noncontroversial subjects as renaming post offices.
  • Even so, it was shot down in the Senate, under opposition from Senators of both parties,* never coming up for vote.
  • It was passed by voice vote in the House again in 2017.
  • It again didn’t come up for vote in the Senate.

Last week’s FISA reauthorization is another example; it wouldn’t have passed without senior-level Democratic support in the House and Senate alike.

*A chief opponent among the Democrats was Diane Feinstein, who despite representing California is commonly hostile to technological good sense. She voted for FISA reauthorization as well.

Like many folks, I’ve been distracted by all the other political calamities that have befallen since November, 2016. But the time to refocus on privacy/surveillance is drawing near.

Related links

  • I wrote about similar subjects in May, 2016, and offered many links then.
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