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Fall 2013 IPEDS Data: Top 30 largest online enrollments per institution

Michael Feldstein - Mon, 2015-01-05 05:18

The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) provide the most official data on colleges and universities in the United States. Last year they released data on distance education (essentially online courses) starting with the Fall 2012 term. Last week they released new data for the Fall 2013 term.

Let’s look at the top 30 online programs for Fall 2013 (in terms of total number of students taking at least one online course) while showing both 2012 and 2013 data. Some notes on the data source:

  • I have combined the categories ‘students exclusively taking distance education courses’ and ‘students taking some but not all distance education courses’ to obtain the ‘at least one DE’ category;
  • The ‘All Students’ category combines those taking DE course with those taking no DE courses;
  • I have highlighted in red the not-for-profit sectors;
  • IPEDS tracks data based on the accredited body, which can differ for systems – I manually combined most for-profit systems into one institution entity as well as Arizona State University[1]; and
  • Please note that along with Russ Poulin from WCET we have identified some significant problems with IPEDS data validity – see this article for more information.

Fall 2013 Top 30 Largest Online Enrollments Per Institution All Students Taking At Least One Online Course (Graduate and Undergraduate, including Non-degree or certificate-seeking)

Top 30

First Impressions
  • With the exception of Grand Canyon University overall and Argosy University for DE, the for-profit sector took a beating with significant drops in both total enrollment and DE enrollment.
  • Western Governors University, University of Central Florida, Southern New Hampshire Univesity, Suffolk County Community College and Northern Virginia Community College seem to have the biggest DE enrollment increases; Suffolk is so dramatic a change in DE without a big change in total enrollment, however, that I assume they changed how they report the data (see the article mentioned above).

We’ll add more data tables and graphics breaking apart this data over the next few weeks here at e-Literate.

Update: Fixed the rank ordering for Suffolk County Community College and Northern Virginia Community College.

  1. ASU splits into various entities although the online programs are coordinated.

The post Fall 2013 IPEDS Data: Top 30 largest online enrollments per institution appeared first on e-Literate.

Script for Exadata I/O Report

Pakistan's First Oracle Blog - Mon, 2015-01-05 00:02
select function_name,sum(SMALL_READ_MEGABYTES)/1024 SM_Read_GB,
sum(SMALL_WRITE_MEGABYTES)/1024 SM_Write_GB,
sum(LARGE_READ_MEGABYTES)/1024 LG_Read_GB, sum(LARGE_WRITE_MEGABYTES)/1024 LG_Write_GB,
sum(LARGE_READ_REQS) LG_Read_Requests,
sum(LARGE_Write_REQS) LG_Write_Requests
from v$iostat_function_detail
group by function_name;
Categories: DBA Blogs

Log Buffer #404, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pakistan's First Oracle Blog - Mon, 2015-01-05 00:01

With new year already in fast gear, bloggers are sparing no stone unturned to come up with innovative ideas. This Log Buffer edition is keeping pace with them as always.
Oracle:

While playing with 12c Scott tried the upgrade to the DEFAULT column syntax that now allows sequences.
This is an age old question and of course the answer depends on how you say “SQL”.
Happy New Year! Upgraded 12.1.0.1 Grid Infrastructure to 12.1.0.2 and applied the Oct 2014 PSU. Had an error during rootupgrade.sh as well, due to the ASM spfile being on disk instead of on ASM diskgroup.
If you (already) created your first Oracle Service Bus 12c application/project with SOAP webservices and tried to deploy it to your IntegratedWeblogic server you might be familiar with this error.
Using Drag-Drop functionality in af:treeTable to move data between nodes.

SQL Server:

Hadoop has been making a lot of noise in the Big Data world.
Lets look at two different ways of creating an HDInsight Cluster: Creating an HDInsight Cluster through Azure Management Portal, and creating an HDInsight Cluster through Windows Azure PowerShell.
Why you need test driven development.
SQL Server Data Import System to Alert For Missed Imports.
Create stunning visualizations with Power View in 20 minutes or less!

MySQL:

So assume you just uploaded the certificate you use to identify yourself to the MySQL server to Github or some other place it doesn’t belong…and there is no undelete.
MySQL Plugin for Oracle Enterprise Manager on VirtualBox: installation gotchas.
MariaDB slave restore using GTID & xtrabackup bug.
How small changes impact complex systems – MySQL example.
In this post, Louis talk about MHA GTID behavior, we test different cases and find something is different from previous versions.

Also Published at Pythian Blog.
Categories: DBA Blogs

EBS 12.2 Validation Scripts for Prepare, Cutover and FS_Clone Phases

Senthil Rajendran - Sun, 2015-01-04 22:45
Are you going to run Prepare, Cutover or FS_CLONE , then before you start the phases using ADOP tool if you would like to validate the instance if it is ready for those phases then here is a simple script.

export RUN_CONTEXT_FILE=/testi/inst/fs1/inst/apps/testi_host1/appl/admin/testi_host1.xml
export PATCH_CONTEXT_FILE=/testi/inst/fs2/inst/apps/testi_host1/appl/admin/testi_host1.xml

perl $AD_TOP/patch/115/bin/txkADOPValidations.pl  -contextfile=$RUN_CONTEXT_FILE -patchctxfile=$PATCH_CONTEXT_FILE -phase=fs_clone -logloc=/tmp
perl $AD_TOP/patch/115/bin/txkADOPValidations.pl  -contextfile=$RUN_CONTEXT_FILE -patchctxfile=$PATCH_CONTEXT_FILE -phase=prepare -logloc=/tmp
perl $AD_TOP/patch/115/bin/txkADOPValidations.pl  -contextfile=$RUN_CONTEXT_FILE -patchctxfile=$PATCH_CONTEXT_FILE -phase=cutover -logloc=/tmp

Review the logfile that gets created under /tmp

You can run the scripts for the phase you are interested and it takes not more than 10 mins.

Creating a new APEX application

Dimitri Gielis - Sun, 2015-01-04 17:30
Previously I announced I would start a chain of blog posts related to Oracle Application Express. Next to the blog posts I'll build up a supporting APEX application where you can see the result of what I explain in real-time.

So, to start the chain I'll create a new APEX application. Almost in every project I start my APEX application the same way. Note that the screenshots are from APEX 4.2.6, as of the time of writing, that is the current latest production release, but I'll mention how things change with APEX 5.0
First I create a APEX application with the wizard (Create > Database application > Next > Next > Next > and use following settings for the Application Attributes:

For my navigation in the application I use Lists. Tabs are old school, so in this screen I changed the default One Level Tabs to No Tabs. If you like Tabs you can always apply a Tab template to your List. Note that in APEX 5.0 this is standard behaviour - APEX will create a "Navigation List" which you can give any look and feel you want.
The date format I filled in too. I like the DD-MON-YYYY format as there's no discussion what the format is (unlike dd/mm/yy or mm/dd/yy etc.)
In APEX 4.2 I start from Theme 25 as that is the responsive theme, so it will adapt to the type of screen it will be rendered on.

In APEX 5.0 I would go for the Universal Theme. That will be responsive and fully customisable through Theme Roller, but I will blog more about that once APEX 5.0 EA3 is released.
Next I give the application an alias (in Application Attributes), in my case DGIELIS_BLOG. That allows me to reference the application in an easier way than to remember the id of the app. 

I'll always create two pages: 
  1. the Global Page (Typically Page 0) which will serve the content that needs to be available on every page for example my List for navigation and my Breadcrumbs region.
  2. the Feedback Page, so people can immediate feedback of my application. This feedback will be captured in Team Development, a fully integrated project management feature of APEX.

The Feedback Page I customise further:


The Application and Page ID I make hidden as they are of less use for the customer. The A, X, Y items I delete. The APEX Development team created those items to align the items better (start-stop table), but with the responsive theme 25 they are not necessary and just overkill. I hope in APEX 5.0 those items are not there anymore.Finally I give the buttons a template (button Template) and make the Submit button hot.

One of my best practices is to make at least one button per page "hot" - the button that is likely to be used most of the time - as that makes the page more lively and user friendly.

The last step for my new application is to create my main navigation. So I create a List (Shared Components > Lists). I create a static List with as name Navigation and I enter the Home Page as first item in the list. Note that in APEX 5.0 such a list will automatically be created for you.

I will add this list to the Global Page (0) - add new Region without Template and select the list.
If you like Tabs, you can chose the Page Level Tabs List for your List Template:

If you selected a List Template different than Tabs you are done, but if you want to see real Page Tabs, you need to read further.
Before those Tabs are visible we need to make sure our Page Template supports tabs.
As during the creation of the application we chose not to use tabs, the default Page template didn't include a "Tab space", so we need to change that.
Go to Shared Components > Themes - Edit Theme (Tasks) - and select for your Page: One Level Tabs:



Now if you place the List Region on Page 0 at Position 6 the List will show up as Tabs as you expect.

You find the app at https://www.apexrnd.be/ords/f?p=DGIELIS_BLOG.

Tomorrow we'll add a report and highlight the negative numbers (with just some css!).
Categories: Development

Partner Webcast – Extending Oracle Applications with Oracle Fusion Middleware Platform

Oracle Fusion Middleware technologies can help strengthen your investments in Oracle Applications, as we’ve discussed on the Oracle AppAdvantage program, by delivering a superior experience,...

We share our skills to maximize your revenue!
Categories: DBA Blogs

Lecture : Oracle Magazine Janvier / Février 2015

Jean-Philippe Pinte - Sun, 2015-01-04 15:39
L'Oracle Magazine  de Janvier / Février est disponible.

Oracle Mobile Suite Service Bus REST and ADF BC SOAP

Andrejus Baranovski - Sun, 2015-01-04 10:06
One of the key parts of Oracle Mobile Suite 12c offering is Service Bus product. This is logical choice - Service Bus allows to transform complex SOAP Web Service data into simplified REST format, preferred by mobile client. I think it is essential to use Service Bus, when implementing enterprise mobile applications. It makes sense to learn how Oracle Service Bus works. I would recommend to start from Steven Davelaar excellent tutorial article, available here - Creating a Mobile-Optimized REST API Using Oracle Service Bus – Part 2.

I have created my own ADF BC application with SOAP WS - findEmployees method (filters by first and last name). Here you can download both applications - MobileServiceBusApp_v1.zip. Keep in mind, for some reason Service Bus server doesn't start with JDEV 12c BPM Default Domain, it works only with JDEV 12c SOA Default Domain. Make sure to check, which JDEV you are using, you can check the list features installed:


ADF BC SOAP service is implemented to support Master-Detail (Employee - Department Managed by Employee) structure:


Detail VO is visible in WS response, only when ADF BC SDO classes are generated for the VO:


Here is Service Bus application main diagram. External Services contains a reference to the ADF BC SOAP WS (invoked through HTTP service). Proxy Services contains a reference to the REST proxy (this will be accessed from mobile device). Pipeline contains a mapping resource, this is where transformation between SOAP and REST happens:


REST proxy service is defined to support getEmployeesList operation with parameter - nameVar:


REST proxy service response is configured with EmployeeListResponse element, stored in HRRestProxy.xsd file:


Here is the structure returned by REST proxy service - list of employees and list of departments managed by employee:


Pipeline mapps SOAP and REST services. Here we can define how request and response actions are handled. Request action is processed with mapping stored in EmployeeDetailsPS2BS file:


Request action mapping is simple, it needs to pass search parameter and assign it to nameVar parameter from SOAP WS:


This is how search parameter is initialised in REST -  through special expression, value is taken from REST request and sent to SOAP call through mapping:


Response is handled with EmployeeDetailsBS2PS mapping:


This mapping is more complex and it represents the data, returned by REST proxy service. Here we need to map all attributes from SOAP WS to REST proxy service response. This is the place, where actual transformation happens - here we can decide, how we map attributes and even convert between types:


To test Service Bus application, you can simply right click on REST proxy service and choose run:


Service Bus application should be accessible in Enterprise Manager, list of all operations should be present. In the picture below, we can see both SOAP and REST proxy services present. You can open HRRestService:


Test button is present, this allows to test REST proxy service directly from Enterprise Manager:


Provide search parameter  - it will look for 'w' in both first and last name:


Response is constructed with list of employees:


This is request URL: http://127.0.0.1:7101/MobileSBProject/HRRestService/employees/w, it can be used from mobile client, to retrieve similar data (department managed by employee 200 is present):


Happy new year

Laurent Schneider - Sun, 2015-01-04 03:16

I just added a few features to WordPress, please report any bug and test your comments here.

Thanks

The Quotable Justin Reich: MOOC research needs to reboot

Michael Feldstein - Sat, 2015-01-03 18:19

Thanks to Audrey Watters I just read a new article in Science Magazine and publicly posted here by Justin Reich, the lead researcher for HarvardX (Harvard’s implementation of edX and associated research team)[1]. Justin calls out the limitations of current MOOC research that focuses on A/B testing and engagement instead of learning, single-course context, and post hoc analysis with proper course design. While praising the field for making available cleansed data for any type of analysis, his core argument is that we need new approaches that cannot be solved just by research teams.
Update: Added link to publicly-available DOCX article.

While the whole article is worth reading, there are quite a few insightful quotes should get past the journal paywall.

  • Big data sets do not, by virtue of their size, inherently possess answers to interesting questions.
  • We have terabytes of data about what students clicked and very little understanding of what changed in their heads.
  • It does not require trillions of event logs to demonstrate that effort is correlated with achievement.

  • One reason that early MOOC studies have examined engagement or completion statistics is that most MOOCs do not have assessment structures that support robust inferences about learning.
  • Distinguishing between engagement and learning is particularly crucial in voluntary online learning settings, because media that provoke confusion and disequilibrium can be productive for learners.
  • Boosting motivation in well-designed courses is good, but if a MOOC’s overall pedagogical approach is misguided, then plug-in experiments can accelerate participation in ineffective practices.
  • For the first MOOC researchers, getting data cleaned for any analysis was an achievement. In early efforts, following the path of least resistance to produce results is a wise strategy, but it runs the risk of creating path dependencies.
  • For the first MOOC researchers, getting data cleaned for any analysis was an achievement. In early efforts, following the path of least resistance to produce results is a wise strategy, but it runs the risk of creating path dependencies.
Some e-Literate Context

This article is a welcome statement from one of the leading MOOC researchers, and it connects with some earlier posts and interactions at e-Literate. In June 2014 I wrote a post contrasting the MOOC research results with the approach taken at the University of Phoenix.

Beyond data aggregated over the entire course, the Harvard and MIT edX data provides no insight into learner patterns of behavior over time. Did the discussion forum posts increase or decrease over time, did video access change over time, etc? We don’t know. There is some insight we could obtain by looking at the last transaction event and number of chapters accessed, but the insight would be limited. But learner patterns of behavior can provide real insights, and it is here where the University of Phoenix (UoP) could teach Harvard and MIT some lessons on analytics. [snip]

UoP recognizes the value of learner behavior patterns, which can only be learned by viewing data patterns over time. The student’s behavior in a course is a long-running transaction, with data sets organized around the learner.[2]

Two days later I wrote a follow-up post based on commenters speculating that Harvard and MIT might have learning data that was just not released.

Granted, I am arguing without definitive proof, but this is a blog post, after all. I base my argument on two points – there is no evidence of HarvardX or MITx pursuing learner-centered long-running data, and I believe there is great difficulty getting non-event or non-aggregate data out of edX, at least in current forms.

Justin Reich replied in the comments, essentially agreeing about the lack of learner-centered long-running data analysis but disagreeing with my arguments on the effect of MOOC architecture and data availability. This comment from June aligns quite well with the current Science Magazine article.

My research presentation was not exhaustive, although generally belies my belief that we need advances in instrumentation and assessment. Fancy manipulations of of predictors (from the click stream) may be limited in value if we don’t have good measures of learning, or a rich understanding of the context of data. But I’m super excited, too, about people doing great work with the edX event log data, and it’ll get out.

It is very encouraging to see the HarvardX team pushing to move beyond clicks-as-engagement and get to actual learning analysis.

Additional Notes

Some additional notes:

  • I still maintain that the course-centric transactional design of MOOCs (as with most LMSs) plays a role in the current, limited MOOC research analysis. I have spoken to many MOOC researchers who lament the enormous amount of time it takes to parse JSON files to try and recreate patterns based on individual learners over time. While I believe that Harvard, MIT, and Stanford have research teams capable of this extraction, a learner-centered system architecture would do wonders to advance the state of art for learning analytics.
  • As mentioned above, I believe that the standard usage of an LMS in online or blended courses leads to many of the same limitations in learning analytics. You could apply many of Justin’s quotes outside of the MOOC world.
  • I wish Justin had moved beyond formal journal and conference proceedings articles in his references and included the results from the MOOC Research Initiative.[3] Although not peer-reviewed, several of these reports addressed deficiencies such as being discipline-specific and even including the assessment considered in the MOOC design (as opposed to post hoc analysis). These reports do not negate the points made in the Science Magazine article, but it would have been useful to include this set of reports as a basis to understand the current state of research.
  1. Note that Science Magazine access requires a subscription or purchase or individual article.
  2. Note that I based this argument on what UoP claims to be producing internally without being able to validate the results.
  3. Disclosure – MRI was funded by the Gates Foundation, which is also a sponsor of the next e-Literate TV series.

The post The Quotable Justin Reich: MOOC research needs to reboot appeared first on e-Literate.

Table Duplication

Jonathan Lewis - Sat, 2015-01-03 05:54

I’ve probably seen a transformation like the following before and I may even have written about it (though if I have I can’t the article), but since it surprised me when I was experimenting with a little problem a few days ago I thought I’d pass it on as an example of how sophisticated the optimizer can be with query transformation.  I’ll be talking about the actual problem that I was working on in a later post so I won’t give you the table and data definitions in this post, I’ll just show some SQL and its plan:


select
        tr.item, tr.trans_date, tr.quantity
    , pr.gross_price
    , pr.net_price
    , pr.special_price
from
        xo_stock_trans tr,
        xo_prices pr
where
        tr.trans_date between '01-AUG-2014' and '3-AUG-2014'
and     pr.item = tr.item
and     pr.price_date = (
                select
                        max(pr2.price_date)
                from
                        xo_prices pr2
                where   pr2.item = tr.item
                and     pr2.price_date <= tr.trans_date
        )
;

The code is a fairly standard expression of “find me the most recent price available for each stock item as at the stock date of that item”. As you can see I’ve referenced the stock table once and the pricing table twice – the second appearance being in a “max()” correlated subquery. Oracle has decided to unnest the subquery – but spot the interesting detail in the plan:


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name           | Rows  | Bytes |TempSpc| Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |                |    14M|   748M|       | 77955  (84)| 00:06:30 |
|*  1 |  HASH JOIN                 |                |    14M|   748M|    37M| 77955  (84)| 00:06:30 |
|*  2 |   HASH JOIN                |                |   829K|    28M|       | 70867  (92)| 00:05:55 |
|   3 |    JOIN FILTER CREATE      | :BF0000        | 25274 |   370K|       |  2530  (13)| 00:00:13 |
|*  4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL      | XO_STOCK_TRANS | 25274 |   370K|       |  2530  (13)| 00:00:13 |
|   5 |    VIEW                    | VW_SQ_1        |   210M|  4206M|       | 64135  (94)| 00:05:21 |
|   6 |     HASH GROUP BY          |                |   210M|  5408M|       | 64135  (94)| 00:05:21 |
|   7 |      JOIN FILTER USE       | :BF0000        |   210M|  5408M|       | 11807  (67)| 00:01:00 |
|*  8 |       HASH JOIN            |                |   210M|  5408M|       | 11807  (67)| 00:01:00 |
|*  9 |        TABLE ACCESS FULL   | XO_STOCK_TRANS | 25274 |   370K|       |  2530  (13)| 00:00:13 |
|* 10 |        INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| XO_PRICES_IX1  |  3918K|    44M|       |  1936  (10)| 00:00:10 |
|  11 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL        | XO_PRICES      |  4571K|    87M|       |  2275  (11)| 00:00:12 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - access("PR"."ITEM"="TR"."ITEM" AND "PR"."PRICE_DATE"="MAX(PR2.PRICE_DATE)")
   2 - access("ITEM_1"=ROWID)
   4 - filter("TR"."TRANS_DATE">=TO_DATE(' 2014-08-01 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss')
              AND "TR"."TRANS_DATE"<=TO_DATE(' 2014-08-03 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'))
   8 - access("PR2"."ITEM"="TR"."ITEM")
       filter("PR2"."PRICE_DATE"<="TR"."TRANS_DATE")
   9 - filter("TR"."TRANS_DATE">=TO_DATE(' 2014-08-01 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss')
              AND "TR"."TRANS_DATE"<=TO_DATE(' 2014-08-03 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'))
  10 - filter("PR2"."PRICE_DATE"<=TO_DATE(' 2014-08-03 00:00:00', 'syyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'))

I was running 11.2.0.4 at the time, which is why we can get a serial Bloom filter on the hash join – and it’s interesting to see that the filter has been pushed inside the view operator; but the really interesting part of the plan is the second appearance of the XO_STOCK_TRANS table.

My correlated subquery returns a value that is used in a comparison with a column in the XO_PRICES table, but the correlation predicates referred back to the XO_STOCK_TRANS table, so the optimizer has added the XO_STOCK_TRANS to the subquery as it unnested it.

I’ve written several examples of how we can optimise SQL manually by rewriting it to introduce extra copies of some of the tables (typically in a fashion analogous to the optimizer’s mechanism for star transformations), so it’s nice to see another variation on the theme of the optimizer using table duplication to optimise a statement.

Footnote:

The execution plan in 10.2.0.5 is slightly different, but it still unnests the subquery, introducing a second occurrence of XO_STOCK_TRANS as it does so.


SQL with Friends ?

Gary Myers - Sat, 2015-01-03 01:11
I'm a regular player of the WordsWithFriends game from Zynga. With some of my regular opponents, we have some side chat. That might be something as simple as letting them know you won't be playing for a few days, or a joke arising from an odd sequence of words.

Recently I'd been sent an URL as a chat message, with a picture from a holiday. It was quite a long URL, with a dubious few characters that may have been the number zero or the letter "O" etc. The chat doesn't allow copying, so rather than trying the variations manually, I took the geek road.

Starting with a Cheeky Monkey post, I learnt that the chat messages were probably in an SQLLite file for the application in a relatively inaccessible 'data/data' location on my Android phone or tablet. 

Stackoverflow told me that I can pull the information from there using the Android debugger's backup command (adb). You may need to install a bunch of stuff, such as an up-to-date Java JDK, to get that running. I'd done that before so it was pretty painless. You also need to enable USB debugging on your device.

Those backups are almost, but not quite, a TAR file. I grabbed a Java tool to convert my backup file into a regular TAR, and then unzipped them with 7-Zip.

It wasn't too hard to find the relevant db file that contained the chat messages. I've got a newer version of the game than the one Cheeky Monkey used, so I had to dig a bit more. My package was called "com.zynga.wwf2.free" rather than the older "com.zynga.words" (but I still had the data from the older version on my phone).

Once I found the right package, the db file was in the db directory as "wf_database.sqlite". sqlite3 was conveniently in the same toolkit as the android debugger.

Back to Stackoverflow for some quick sqlite info and I had a set of CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements.

I could have simply grepped for the URL, but being a database person I couldn't resist a final stage.

A few find/replaces were need to switch the DDL to Oracle syntax (different data type names and Oracle is constrained by the 30 character column names). I then imported the users (players), games, moves and chat messages into my XE database and came up with a query to extract the chat messages and the player who posted it.

I think the chat for a deleted game would be a lot harder to recover. While you don't need to root your device, you will need to enable debugging and authorise the backup and so you need regular access to the device. If you can't get past the lock screen, this won't help.

I mentioned that I still had the data files for the older version of the game. I mistakenly opened these first, and was surprised to find that the user data included email addresses for many entries. None were for my regular opponents, but some were for people I recall playing once or twice. I don't recall many of the users, who may have been people I played as a random pick, or may have been on a 'leaderboard'. The data for the newer version of the game only had the email address for my user. 

My player name (sydoracle) is pretty easy to track back to the "real" me, and I use a unique email address when I sign up to most services. But others might have been more concerned to find the email addresses were being shared, even in a concealed manner. 

Log Buffer #404, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pythian Group - Fri, 2015-01-02 09:35

With new year already in fast gear, bloggers are sparing no stone unturned to come up with innovative ideas. This Log Buffer edition is keeping pace with them as always.

Oracle:

While playing with 12c Scott tried the upgrade to the DEFAULT column syntax that now allows sequences.

This is an age old question and of course the answer depends on how you say “SQL”.

Happy New Year! Upgraded 12.1.0.1 Grid Infrastructure to 12.1.0.2 and applied the Oct 2014 PSU. Had an error during rootupgrade.sh as well, due to the ASM spfile being on disk instead of on ASM diskgroup.

If you (already) created your first Oracle Service Bus 12c application/project with SOAP webservices and tried to deploy it to your IntegratedWeblogic server you might be familiar with this error.

Using Drag-Drop functionality in af:treeTable to move data between nodes.

SQL Server:

Hadoop has been making a lot of noise in the Big Data world.

Lets look at two different ways of creating an HDInsight Cluster: Creating an HDInsight Cluster through Azure Management Portal, and creating an HDInsight Cluster through Windows Azure PowerShell.

Why you need test driven development.

SQL Server Data Import System to Alert For Missed Imports.

Create stunning visualizations with Power View in 20 minutes or less!

MySQL:

So assume you just uploaded the certificate you use to identify yourself to the MySQL server to Github or some other place it doesn’t belong…and there is no undelete.

MySQL Plugin for Oracle Enterprise Manager on VirtualBox: installation gotchas.

MariaDB slave restore using GTID & xtrabackup bug.

How small changes impact complex systems – MySQL example.

In this post, Louis talk about MHA GTID behavior, we test different cases and find something is different from previous versions.

Categories: DBA Blogs

ORA-06508 in an EBS 12.2 environment ?

Senthil Rajendran - Fri, 2015-01-02 07:20

Custom.pll template are sometimes used wrong. In case of 12.2 make sure you use the seeded 12.2 template to put in you customizations. In case if you are migrating from a older release make sure it is created from the latest versions. You can check the version using adident package. ORA-06508 are known to be a problem with older custom.pll template.

$APPLTMP directory in R12.2 Multi Node

Senthil Rajendran - Fri, 2015-01-02 07:15

$APPLTMP directory in R12.2 if placed in a shared location in a multi node environment the there are know complications in multi node cutover. So best to leave it under INST top for each node.

EBS 12.2 Too Many Invalid ?

Senthil Rajendran - Fri, 2015-01-02 06:57

Run EBS 12.2 Compliance Checker and resolve any violations.

Document 1531121.1, "Using the Online Patching Readiness Report in Oracle E-Business Suite Release 12.2"

The consequences of failing to fix a violation depend on the type of violation. Objects that do not comply with Online Patching development standards may behave incorrectly or become invalid during or after online patching.

Some customers have synonyms from custom schemas pointing directly to the base tables. Don't you think this is a 12.2 violation that should be fixed....

Want to learn Exadata ?

Amardeep Sidhu - Fri, 2015-01-02 03:19

Many people have asked me this question that how they can learn Exadata ? It starts sounding even more difficult as a lot of people don’t have access to Exadata environments. So thought about writing a small post on the same.

It actually is not as difficult as it sounds. There are a lot of really good resources available from where you can learn about Exadata architecture and the things that work differently from any non-Exadata platform. You might be able to do lot more RnD if you have got access to an Exadata environment but don’t worry if you haven’t. Without that also there is a lot that you can explore. So here we go:

  1. I think the best reference that one can start with is Expert Oracle Exadata book by Tanel Poder, Kerry Osborne and Randy Johnson. As a traditional book covers the subject topic by topic from ground up so it makes a fun read. This book is also no different. It will teach you a lot. They are already working on the second edition. (See here).
  2. Next you can jump to whitepapers on Oracle website Exadata page, blog posts (keep an eye on OraNA.info) and whitepapers written by other folks. There is a lot of useful material out there. You just need to Google a bit.
  3. Exadata documentation (not public yet) should be your next stop if you have got access to it. Patch 10386736 on MOS if you have got the access.
  4. Try to attend an Oracle Users Group conference if there is one happening in your area. Most likely someone would be presenting on Exadata so you can use that opportunity to learn about it. Also you will get a chance to ask him questions.
  5. Lastly if you have an Exadata machine available do all the RnD you can.

Happy New Year and Happy Learning !

Categories: BI & Warehousing

Harmonizing Learning and Education

Michael Feldstein - Thu, 2015-01-01 16:20

I’m the Whether Man, not the Weather Man, for after all it’s more important to know whether there will be weather than what the weather will be.

The Phantom Tollbooth

Dave Cormier has written a couple of great posts on our failure to take learner motivation seriously and the difference between improving learning and improving education. In the latter post—a response to Stephen Downes’ comment on the former post—Dave writes about the tension between improving an individual’s learning and improving our system of education, essentially positing that the reason why we as a society often fail to take learner engagement sufficiently seriously is because we become preoccupied with making the educational system accountable, a goal that we would be irresponsible not to take on but that we are also essentially doomed to fail at. (I may be putting words in his mouth on that last bit.) Dave writes,

There’s definitely something wrong if people are leaving their first degree and are not engaged in learning. We certainly need to address it. We totally want to be in the business of helping people do what they want to do. Try it. No really. Just try it. Sit down with a child and help them do what they want to do. And i don’t mean “hey this child has shown up with a random project they are totally passionate about and are asking me a question” I mean “stop them at a random time, say 8:25am, and just start helping them.” You will get blank stares. You’ll get resistance. You’ll get students who will say anything you want if it means you will go away/give them a grade. You will not enjoy this process. They will also not enjoy it.

There is something wrong. The problem is that we have built an education system with checks and balances, trying to make it accountable and progressive (in some cases), but we are building it without knowing why. We have not built an education system that encourages people to be engaged. The system is not designed to do it. It’s designed to get people to a ‘standard of knowing.’ Knowing a thing, in the sense of being able to repeat it back or demonstrate it, has no direct relationship to ‘engagement’. There are certainly some teachers that create spaces where engagement occurs, but they are swimming upstream, constantly battling the dreaded assessment and the need to cover the curriculum. The need to guarantee knowing.

He suggests that we need to redesign our education system around the goal of getting students to start caring and keep caring about learning. And his argument is interesting:

Give me a kid who’s forgotten 95% of the content they were measured in during K-12 and I will match that with almost every adult i know. Give me a kid who cares about learning… well… then i can help them do just about anything.

This is partly a workplace argument. It’s an economic value argument. It’s a public good argument. If Dave is right, then people who care about learning are going to be better at just about any job you throw at them than people who don’t. This is a critical argument in favor of public funding of a liberal arts education, personalized in the old-fashioned sense of having-to-do-with-individual-persons, that much of academia has ceded for no good reason I can think of. The sticky wicket, though, is accountability which, as Dave points out, is the main reason we have a schism between learning and education in the first place. Too bad we can’t demonstrate, statistically, that people who are passionate about learning are better workers. It’s a shame that we don’t have good data linking being excited about learning, being a high-performer in your job, and being a happy, fulfilled and economically well-off person. If we had that, we could largely resolve the tension between improving learning and improving education. We could give a compelling argument that it is in the taxpayers’ interest to build an education system whose purpose, as Dave suggests, is to increase the chances that students will start to care and continue to care about learning. It’s a tragedy that we don’t have proof of that link.

Oh, wait.

The Intuition Behind the Argument

Before I get into the numbers, I think it’s important to articulate the argument in a way that makes intuitive sense even to skeptics. As Dave points out, everybody agrees with the proposition that students should love learning if that proposition is presented to them as a platitude. Where people start to waffle is when we present the proposition to them as a priority, as in, “It is more important for students to learn to develop and nurture a passion for learning than it is for them to learn any particular thing.” And in order to resolve the tension between learning and education, we need to make an even stronger proposition: “A student who develops a passion for learning about subjects that are unrelated to her eventual career will, on balance, be a better employee and more successful professional than the same student who has studied content directly related to her eventual career with relative indifference.” Do you believe this proposition? Here’s a test:

Imagine that you could go back in time and choose an undergraduate major that was exactly tailored to the job that you do today. Would you be better or worse at your job than you are now? Would you be more or less happy?

Obviously, this test won’t work for people whose undergraduate major was the perfect pre-professional major for what they are doing now, which will include most faculty. But it should work for a majority of people, including lots of folks in business and government. In my case, I was a philosophy major, which prepared me well for a career in anything except philosophy. If I could have precognitively created a major for myself in educational technology back in the late 1980s, would I be more successful today? Would I be happier? The answer to both of those questions is almost certainly “no.” In fact, there is a good chance that I would have been less successful and less happy. Why? For one thing, I didn’t care about educational technology back then. I cared about philosophy. I pursued it with a passion. This gave me three things that I still have today. First, I have the intellectual tools of a philosopher. I don’t think I would have held onto the tools of another discipline if I didn’t care about them when I was learning about them. Second, I know what it feels like to pursue work that I am passionate about. I am addicted to that feeling. I am driven to find it in every job, and I am not satisfied until I do. This makes me more selective about the jobs I look at and much, much better at the ones that I take. And finally, though it was a long and winding road, my interest in philosophy led me to my interest in instructional technology in many ways. We tend to have a rather stunted notion of what it means for a subject we study to be “related” to our work. In my philosophy classes, I spent a lot of time thinking about what it means to “know” something, what it means to “learn” something, and what it means for something to be “good.” I got to see how these words are tangled up in logic, language, and culture, and how our notions of them change over time. I learned how to write and how to think, while I was simultaneously studying the first principles of language and cognition. All of these experiences, all of this knowledge, all of these skills have been directly valuable to me in my career as a professional non-philosopher (or a standup philosopher, as Mel Brooks might call me). I wouldn’t have them if I had majored in educational technology. I would have other things, but honestly, there are no deep skills in my work that I wish I had acquired through earlier specialization. Everything that I have needed to learn, I have been able to learn on the job. As Dave wrote, “Give me a kid who cares about learning… well… then i can help them do just about anything.”

If you are one of those people who majored in exactly what you ended up doing as a career, then try reversing the thought experiment. Suppose you could go back in time and major in anything you wanted. Something that you were passionate about, but something different from what you ended up majoring in. Would it have made a difference? Would you have been more or less successful in your current career? Would you have been more or less happy than you are now? For some folks, that pre-professional major was exactly what they needed to be doing. But I bet that, for a lot of folks, it wasn’t.

Survey says…?!

If any of this resonates with you at all, then you really must read the 2014 Gallup Purdue Index Report. You’ll have to register to get it, but trust me, this one is worth it. Gallup is most widely known for their political polling, but more broadly, their business is in collecting data that links people’s attitudes and beliefs to observable behaviors and objective outcomes. How likely is a person who thinks the “country is on the wrong track” to vote for the incumbent? Or to vote at all? Does believing that your manager is incompetent correlate with an increased chance of a serious heart problem? And conversely, does “having fun” at your job correlate with a higher chance of living into your 90s? Does having a “manager that cares about me as a person” mean that I am more likely to be judged a “top performer” at work and reduce the likelihood that I will be out sick? Does having a teacher who “makes me feel excited about learning” correlate with better workplace engagement when I graduate?

Ah. There it is.

To get the full impact of Gallup’s research, you have to follow it backwards from its roots. The company does significant business in employee satisfaction surveys. As with schooling, managers know that employee engagement matters but often fail to take it seriously. But according to research cited in Gallup’s book Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements (which I also recommend), employees who could answer “yes” to the question about whether their manager cares about them as a person, are “more likely to be top performers, produce higher quality work, are less likely to be sick, less likely to change jobs, and less likely to get injured on the job.” Also, people who love their jobs are more likely to both stay working longer and live longer. In a study George Gallup conducted in the 1950s,

…men who lived to see 95 did not retire until they were 80 years old on average. Even more remarkable, 93% of these men reported getting a great deal of satisfaction out of the work they did, and 86% reported having fun doing their job.

Conversely, a 2008 study the company found a link between employee disengagement and depression:

We measured their engagement levels and asked them if they had ever been diagnosed with depression. We excluded those who reported that they had been diagnosed with depression from our analysis. When we contacted the remaining panel members in 2009, we again asked them if they had been diagnosed with depression in the last year. It turned out that 5% of our panel members (who had no diagnosis of depression in 2008) had been newly diagnosed with depression. Further, those who were actively disengaged in their careers in 2008 were nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next year. While there are many factors that contribute to depression, being disengaged at work appears to be a leading indicator of a subsequent clinical diagnosis of depression.

Which is obviously bad for employer and employee alike.

In some cases, Gallup went all in with physiological studies. For example, they “recruited 168 employees and studied their engagement, heart rate, stress levels, and various emotions throughout the day,” using heart rate monitors, saliva samples, and handheld devices that surveyed employees on their activities and feelings of the moment at various points in the day.

After reviewing all of these data, it was clear that when people who are engaged in their jobs show up for work, they are having an entirely different experience than those who are disengage. [Emphasis in original.] For those who were engaged, happiness and interest throughout the day were significantly higher. Conversely, stress levels were substantially higher for those who were disengaged. Perhaps most strikingly, disengaged workers’ stress levels decreased and their happiness increased toward the end of the workday….[P]eople with low engagement…are simply waiting for the workday to end.

From here, the authors go on to talk about depression and heart attacks and all that bad stuff that happens to you when you hate that job. But there was one other striking passage at the beginning of this section:

Think back to when you were in school sitting through a class in which you had very little interest. Perhaps you eyes were fixed on the clock or you were staring blankly into space. You probably remember the anticipation of waiting for the bell to ring so you could get up from your desk and move on to whatever was next. More than two-thirds of workers around the world experience a similar feeling by the end of a typical workday.

And here’s what Dave said in his first post:

Student separate into two categories… those that care and those that don’t care.

Our job, as educators, is to convince students who don’t care to start caring, and to encourage those who currently care, to continue caring.

All kinds of pedagogy happens after this… but it doesn’t happen until this happens.

So. In this case, we’re trying to make students move from the ‘not care’ category to the ‘care’ category by threatening to not allow them to stay with their friends. Grades serve a number of ‘not care to care’ purposes in our system. Your parents may get mad, so you should care. You’ll be embarrassed in front of your friends so you should care. In none of these cases are you caring about ‘learning’ but rather caring about things you, apparently, already care about. We take the ‘caring about learning’ part as a lost cause.

The problem with threatening people is that in order for it to continue to work, you have to continue to threaten them (well… there are other problems, but this is the relevant one for this discussion). And, as has happened, students no longer care about grades, or their parents believe their low grades are the fault of the teacher, then the whole system falls apart. You can only threaten people with things they care about.

I’m not suggesting that we shouldn’t hold kids accountable, but if we’re trying to encourage people to care about their work, about their world, is it practical to have it only work when someone is threatening them? Even if you are the most cynical personal imaginable, wouldn’t you like people to be able to do things when you aren’t actually threatening them? Are we promoting a ‘creative/knowledge economy’ by doing this? Are we building democracy? Unless you are a fascist (and i really mean that, unless you want a world where a couple of people tell everyone exactly what to do) you can’t really want the world to be this way.

It turns out that Dave actually overstates the case for Fascism. Fascist bosses get bad results from employees (in addition to, you know, killing them). If you want high-performing workers, you need engaged workers. And you can’t force people to engage.

Wellbeing isn’t just about work. It looks at five different types of personal “wellbeing”—career, social, financial, physical, and community—and shows how they are related to each other, to overall wellbeing, and to performance at work and in the world. (By the way, there’s a lot of good stuff in the sections on social and community wellbeing for the connectivists and constructionists in the crowd.)

We Don’t Need No Education

The Gallup Purdue Index Report picks up where Wellbeing leaves off. Having established some metrics that correlate both with overall personal happiness and success as well as workplace success, Gallup backs up and asks the question, “What kind of education is more likely to promote wellbeing?” They surveyed a number of college graduates in various age groups and with various measured levels of wellbeing, asking them to reflect back on their college experiences. What they didn’t find is in some ways as important as what they did find. They found no correlation between whether you went to a public or private, selective or non-selective school and whether you achieved high levels of overall wellbeing. It doesn’t matter, on average, whether you go to Harvard University or Podunk College. It doesn’t matter whether your school scored well in the U.S. News and World Report rankings. Student debt levels, on the other hand, do matter, so maybe that Harvard vs. Podunk choice matters after all. And, in a finding that will cheer my philosophy professors, it turns out that “[s]lightly more employed graduates who majored in the arts and humanities (41%) and social sciences (41%) are engaged at work than either science (38%) or business (37%) majors.”

What factors did matter? What moved the needle? Odds of thriving in all five areas of Gallup’s wellbeing index were

  • 1.7 times higher if “I had a mentor who encouraged me to pursue my goals and dreams”
  • 1.5 times higher if “I had at least one professor at [College] who made me excited about learning”
  • 1.7 times higher if “My professors at [College] cared about me as a person”
  • 1.5 times higher if “I had an internship or job that allowed me to apply what I was learning in the classroom”
  • 1.1 times higher if “I worked on a project that took a semester or more to complete”
  • 1.4 times higher if “I was extremely active in extracurricular activities and organizations while attending [College]”

Again, the institution type didn’t matter (except for students who went to for-profit private colleges, only 4% of which were found to be thriving on all five measures of wellbeing). It really comes down to feeling connected to your school work and your teachers, which does not correlate well with the various traditional criteria people use for evaluating the quality of an educational institution. If you buy Gallup’s chain of argument and evidence this, in turn, suggests that being a hippy-dippy earthy-crunchy touchy-feely constructivy-connectivy commie pinko guide on the side will produce more productive workers and a more robust economy (not to mention healthier, happier human beings who get sick less and therefore keep healthcare costs lower) than being a hard-bitten Taylorite-Skinnerite practical this-is-the-real-world-kid type career coach. It turns out that pursuing your dreams is a more economically productive strategy, for you and your country, than pursuing your career. It turns out that learning a passion to learn is more important for your practical success than learning any particular facts or skills. It turns out that it is more important to know whether there will be weather than what the weather will be.

So…what do we do with all this ed tech junk we just bought?

This doesn’t mean that ed tech is useless by any means, but it does mean that we have to think about what we use it for and what it can realistically accomplish. Obviously, anything that helps teachers and advisers connect with students, students connect with each other, or students connect with their passions is good. There’s also nothing inherently wrong with video lectures or adaptive learning programs as long as they are used as informational supplements once students start caring about what they learn or as tools to keep them caring about what they learn rather than substitutes for real engagement that shovel content in the name of “competency.” I’m interested in “flipping,” fad or no fad, because it emphasizes using the technology to clear the way for more direct human-to-human interactions with the students. Competencies themselves should be used more as markers of progress down a road that the student has chosen to travel rather than a set of hoops that the student must jump through (like a trained dog). Another thing that technologies can do is help students with what may be the only prerequisite to having passion to learn, which is believing that you can learn. In the places where I’ve seen adaptive learning software employed to most impressive effect, it has been in concert with outreach and support designed to help students who never learned to believe in themselves discover that they can, in fact, make progress in their education. Well-designed adaptive software lets them get help without feeling embarrassed and, perhaps more importantly, enables them to arrive at a confidence-building feeling of success and accomplishment quickly.

The core problem with our education system isn’t the technology or even the companies. It’s how we deform teaching and learning in the name of accountability in education. Corporate interests amplify this problem greatly because they sell to it, thus reinforcing it. But they are not where the problem begins. It begins when we say, “Yes, of course we want the students to love to learn, but we need to cover the material.” Or when we say, “It’s great that kids want to go to school every day, but really, how do we know that they’re learning anything?” It’s daunting to think about trying to change this deep cultural attitude. Nor does embracing Gallup’s train of evidence fully get us out of the genuine moral obligation to find some sort of real (but probably inherently deforming) measure of accountability for schools. But the most interesting and hopeful result from the Gallup research is this:

You don’t have to have every teacher make you feel excited about learning in order to have a better chance at a better life. You just need one.

Just one.

The post Harmonizing Learning and Education appeared first on e-Literate.

Four Secrets of Success

FeuerThoughts - Thu, 2015-01-01 09:56
More than a few people think that I am pretty good at what I do, that I am successful. I respect their judgement and thought about what contributed to my success. I came up with four that form a foundation for (my) success. Since it is possible that others will find them helpful, I have decided to share my Four Secrets of Success (book in the works, film rights sold to Branjolina Films).
Follow these four recommendations, and you will be more successful in anything and everything you seek to accomplish.
1. Drink lots of water.
if you are dehydrated, nothing about you is operating optimally. By the time you realize you are thirsty, you are depleted. You are tired and listless. You think about getting another cup of coffee but your stomach complains at the thought.
No problem. Just get yourself a big glass of water, room termperature, no ice, and drink it down. You will feel the very substance of life trickle into your body and bring you back to life. Then drink another glass. 
Couldn’t hurt to try, right?
2. Work your abs.
What they say about a strong core? It’s all true. Strengthen your abdominal muscles and you will be amazed at the change in your life. I vouch for it from my own experience. 
I’m not talking about buying an Ab-Roller or going nuts with crazy crunches. Just do something every day, and see if you can do a little more every day. 
Couldn’t hurt to try, right?
3. Go outside. 
Preferably amongst trees, in a forest. 
We did not evolve to sit in front of a screen, typing. Our bodies do not like what we force them to do. Go outside and you will make your body happy. And seeing how your brain is inside your body, it will make you happy, too. Then when you get back to the screen, you will be energized, creative and ready to solve problems.
Couldn’t hurt to try, right?
How do I know these three things will make a difference? Because whenever I stop doing any of them for very long, I start to feel bad, ineffective, unfocused. 
Oh, wait a minute. I said “Four Secrets of Success”. So there’s one more. This one’s different from the others. The above three are things I suggest you do. Number Four is, in contrast, something I suggest you stop doing:
4. Turn off your TV.
By which I mean: stop looking at screens for sources of information about the world. Rely on direct experience as much as possible.
Not only is television bad for humans physically, but you essentially turn off your brain when you watch it. If, instead, you turn off the TV, you will find that you have more time (objectively and subjectively) to think about things (and go outside, and work your abs, and...).
Couldn’t hurt to try, right?
Well, actually, you might find it kind of painful to turn off your TV. It depends on how comfortable you are living inside your own mind. 
And if you are not comfortable, well, how does that make you feel?
Wishing you the best in 2015,Steven Feuerstein
Categories: Development

Oracle Advanced Procurement

OracleApps Epicenter - Thu, 2015-01-01 06:55
Oracle Advanced Procurement is an integrated suite of software that dramatically cuts all supply man-agement costs. It adapts to your purchasing processes, supporting any combination of procurement models. It leverages Oracle’s extensive applications capabilities, robust development and operating platform, and award-winning global support. Thousands of companies in diverse industries—including professional services, government, asset-intensive sectors, and […]
Categories: APPS Blogs