Skip navigation.

Feed aggregator

<b>Contributions by Angela Golla,

Oracle Infogram - Mon, 2014-09-29 12:36
Contributions by Angela Golla, Infogram Deputy Editor

Oracle Security Alert for CVE-2014-7169

Security Alert  CVE-2014-7169 addresses a publicly disclosed vulnerability affecting GNU Bash. GNU Bash is a popular open source command line shell incorporated into Linux and other widely used operating systems. This vulnerability affects multiple Oracle products. This vulnerability may be remotely exploitable without authentication, i.e. it may be exploited over a network without the need for a username and password. A remote user can exploit this vulnerability to execute arbitrary code on systems that are running affected versions of Bash. 

Oracle is still investigating this issue and will provide fixes for affected products as soon as they have been fully tested and determined to provide effective mitigation against the vulnerability. 
The fixes that are available for immediate application by customers are listed in the Patch Availability Table. This Security Alert will be updated when fixes are available for additional affected Oracle products without sending additional emails to customers. Customers should check this page for updates.
Due to the severity, public disclosure, and reports of active exploitation of CVE-2014-7169, Oracle strongly recommends that customers apply the fixes provided by this Security Alert as soon as they are released by Oracle.

The Best Question So Far

Floyd Teter - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:58
So I was in a session here at OOW14 on “User Group Sunday” when one of the attendees asked what I consider to be the best question I’ve heard in a long, long time.

If the Oracle Cloud is so wonderful, why haven’t all of Oracle customers moved to it already?

Great, great question.   Goes straight to the heart of one of Oracle’s primary messages.  The answer played out as something close to what follows:

1.  The cloud - services model is still relatively immature within the Oracle ecosystem.  Some elements of Oracle’s pricing and execution in the services model are still being worked out.  And that will take some time, mostly because human beings typically don’t change behavior at the drop of a hat…regardless of where they work.  It’s still a work in progress, so many customers are taking a “wait and see” approach while things work themselves out.

2.  Services revenue, while growing, only constitutes about five percent of Oracle’s revenue at the moment.  Cloud services are still a relatively new thing in the Oracle  world.  Not every customer is ready to be on the leading edge, especially in light of their own corporate culture.

3.  It’s tough to move customizations to the cloud.  There’s no secret sauce to make it easy.  Some heavily-customized customers have many customization to reconsider before they’ll be ready to take advantage of cloud services.  The same could be said for data - many customers have significant data clean-up efforts required to be cloud-ready.  Again, there’s no secret sauce for this.

4.  Lack of control, sometime expressed as a concern over data security.  In a public cloud in particular, a customer’s servers are no longer under their control.  Ditto for data storage.  While that makes some customers nervous, I’d suggest those concerns be balanced by two thoughts:  A) Oracle is probably better at protecting your data than you are.  Protecting data is part of their core business.  Most Oracle customers do not generate revenue or profits by protecting data; B) Citing Oracle’s Thomas Kurian:  “most customers would rather use enterprise applications than run enterprise applications.”  Moving to the new model requires customers to let go of running the applications - for most customers, the economics alone make that a good thing.


It’s a funny thing.  Cloud services offer some pretty significant benefits: relief from the maintenance associated with running enterprise applications, the capability to be more agile in development, the flexibility to quickly scale up and down as computing requirements change.  Lots of benefits available in cloud application services.  What’s holding customers back from getting those benefits for themselves comes down to two overarching theme:  1) challenges in their own mindset or corporate culture; 2) the state of their data or architecture.  That seems to be it, unless I’m missing something.  And, if I am, you can tell me in the comments.

OCP 12C – Enterprise Manager and Other Tools

DBA Scripts and Articles - Mon, 2014-09-29 11:20

EM Database Express The old Enterprise Manager database control is replaced by Enterprise Manager database express in Oracle 12c. It contains only basic administration capabilities as the advanced ones are included in Enterprise Manager cloud control With EM database Express you can manage Security (Users, roles, profiles), Configuration (Instance Parameters, memory, database features), Storage (tablespaces, [...]

The post OCP 12C – Enterprise Manager and Other Tools appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite introduces JSR-286 portlet integration that brings Google search to Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal

Integrated Google search has arrived for Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal. Last week, Fishbowl Solutions announced the GSA (Google Search Appliance) Portal Search Suite. This is Fishbowl’s fourth product for the Google Search Appliance, and introduces a productized integration that exposes Google search features like spelling suggestions, dynamic navigation, and document previews directly within the portal.

Previous integrations between the GSA and WebCenter or Liferay Portal had to be heavily customized to expose similar search features and functionality. In most cases, extensive customization was needed even when adding only one new search feature, such as autocomplete query suggestions, to portal search pages. Additionally, such customization had to be done by someone with specialized technical expertise including portal development, familiarity with the GSA response format, and XML transformation. Alternately some organizations have used the GSA’s built-in stylesheet typically directing users to search functions outside of the portal either as an iframe or a completely separate search page. This disconnect devalues the portal as being the single, universal location to access enterprise information, and detracts from the overall portal user experience.

Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite seamlessly integrates the GSA with WebCenter and Liferay portals. The integration is made possible by a collection of JSR-286 portlets that provide a search box and search results layout directly within the portal. These configurable portlets let customers choose which Google search features to expose, and lets them mix and match portlets for specific pages. The GSA Portal Search Suite also includes an authentication mechanism to provide single-sign-on between the portal and the GSA when performing secure searches. All these features help ensure that searches conducted from the portal return results with higher relevancy, and that search pages match the look and feel of the portal, leading to an enhanced user experience.

Customers with WebCenter or Liferay Portal that are looking to improve relevancy and provide search features that users have come to expect can do so with the GSA. And now with Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite, a seamless and flexible integration is available decreasing time to value and helping to maximize your WebCenter, Liferay and GSA investment.

Fishbowl will be demonstrating GSA Portal Search Suite, as well as our other GSA value-add products, at Oracle OpenWorld from September 29th through October 1st. You can see us in booth #2036 Moscone South. To read the brochure, click here.

GSA Portal Search Screen

 

The post Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite introduces JSR-286 portlet integration that brings Google search to Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

SQLSaturday Pittsburgh Script [VIDEO]

Chris Foot - Mon, 2014-09-29 09:55

Transcript

Database administrators are responsible for keeping data safe and available, and continuing their education is vital for them to stay current on the best practices and features of the database platforms they support.

Hi, welcome back to RDX. One way SQL Server DBAs can learn new skills is by registering for a SQLSaturday, an all-day SQL Server training event, near them.

RDX is a proud supporter of Pittsburgh’s SQLSaturday on October 4 at the Pittsburgh Technical Institute. Register to hear six RDX speakers share their knowledge about code tuning, new features in SQL 2014, and Business Intelligence. More details about all speaking sessions and registration can be found on Pittsburgh’s SQL Saturday website.

Make sure you stop by RDX’s booth for your chance to win a $100 Amazon.com gift card.
Hope to see you there! Thanks for watching.

The post SQLSaturday Pittsburgh Script [VIDEO] appeared first on Remote DBA Experts.

12c Fixed Subquery

Jonathan Lewis - Mon, 2014-09-29 09:18

It’s been about 8 months since I posted a little note about a “notable change in behaviour” of the optimizer when dealing with subqueries in the where clause that could be used to return a constant, e.g.:


select
	*
from	t1
where	id between (select 10001 from dual)
	   and     (select 90000 from dual)
;

There’s been a note at the start of the script ever since saying: Check if this is also true for any table with ‘select fixed_value from table where primary = constant’ I finally had a few minutes this morning (San Francisco time) to check – and it does, in both 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.2. With the t1 table from the previous article run the following:


drop table t2 purge;

create table t2 (
        n1 number(6) not null,
        n2 number(6) not null
);

alter table t2 add constraint t2_pk primary key(n1);

insert into t2 values(1,10000);
insert into t2 values(2,90000);

set autotrace traceonly explain

select * from t1
where   id between (select 10000 from t2 where n1 = 1)
           and     (select 90000 from t2 where n1 = 1)
;

set autotrace off

Instead of the historic 5% of 5% selectivity, the plan shows the optimizer predicting (approximately) the 80,000 rows that it will actually get:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation          | Name  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |       | 80003 |  8828K|   218   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL | T1    | 80003 |  8828K|   218   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX UNIQUE SCAN| T2_PK |     1 |    13 |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |   INDEX UNIQUE SCAN| T2_PK |     1 |    13 |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - filter("ID"<= (SELECT 90000 FROM "T2" "T2" WHERE "N1"=1) AND
              "ID">= (SELECT 10000 FROM "T2" "T2" WHERE "N1"=1))
   2 - access("N1"=1)
   3 - access("N1"=1)

I can’t think it’s very likely that anyone has written SQL that looks like this – but I’m often surprised by what I see in the field, so if this style looks familiar and you’re still on 11.2.0.3 or lower, watch out for changes in execution plan on the upgrade to 11.2.0.4 or 12c.


Oracle Technology Network Sunday in Review / Monday Preview - Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne

OTN TechBlog - Mon, 2014-09-29 09:16

Sunday OTN Kick Off Event was a BIG success and the RAC ATTACK was awesome. Thanks for joining us!

Here is a listing of OTN activities at Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne for Monday, September 29th. Be sure to double check the schedule at the when you visit the OTN Lounge for any changes.  


OTN Lounge - Upper Lobby, Moscone South -

Monday, September 29th to Wednesday October 1st-

  • Oracle ACE Program –11:30 to 3:30 - The Oracle ACE Program Recognizes prominent advocates.  Stop by to learn how to become an Oracle ACE, Gain community recognition for sharing your knowledge and expertise, Advance your career and network with like-minded peers
  • Oracle Community  - 11:30 to 3:30 - Learn about the Oracle Technology Network Community Platform, and get a preview of the new badges that are coming soon! Get answers to questions, network with peers, and be rewarded for your expertise/activity in the Oracle Community
  • MAF Developer Challenge Office Hours – 12pm to 1pm - Taking the challenge?  Stop by and talk to a MAF product expert.  Not signed up? There is still time to register for the MAF Developer Challenge.  Go here to register: (XXX)
  • Relax and Make Your Own Shirt or Origami with us in the Lounge. 

Monday September 29th Only -

  • SQL Live - Monday, September 29th, 2:00pm – 4:00 pm - Come learn about this Dynamic leaning environment featuring code libraries, tutorials, schemas and worksheets for improving your SQL and PL/SQL knowledge and skills. 
  • Delphix and DbVisit –Monday, September 29th, 3:30pm to 5pm  - Enter the worlds of database replication and virtualization fast and hassle free. Meet with experts that will help you get up and running with tools and labs that will help you grok how replication and virtualization really work.
  • Oracle Technology Network’s TechFest with Tweet for a Beer–Monday September, 29th 7pm to 9pm – Howard Street Plaza - OTN's Tech Fest is the place hang with your techie peers, sip wine or drink beer, dance to the DJ. Be sure to keep your eyes out for the blinking OTN team they will be walking around the event handing out "goodies" while they last.  This event is open to Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne full conference pass attendees. Don't forget your badge!
  • The Yes SQL session hosted by Steven Feuerstein for 6:00 PM this evening is "sold out" but not to worry, Steven will be in the OTN Lounge all week with SQL and PL/SQL books and ready to answer any questions.  


OTN Activities @ Java Hub / Hilton - Monday, September 29th to Wednesday, October 1st -

  • Hackergarten
  •     3D Modeling 
  •     Meet The Experts
  •     Get Your NEW OTN Java Shirt! Find out how onsite @ the OTN Desk in the Java Hub


What to Expect at Oracle OpenWorld this Year [VIDEO]

Chris Foot - Mon, 2014-09-29 04:28

Transcript

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 is just around the corner, but what can IT professionals gain from attending?

Hi – welcome back to RDX. From September 28 to October 2, representatives from across the globe will travel to the Moscone Center in San Francisco to learn more about Oracle products and current IT trends.

Moscone North will feature presentations by Intel President Renee James, Oracle President Mark Hurd and Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka, among others. Discussions will focus on the implications of cloud computing, business transformations and streamlining data-intensive processes.

RDX is excited to participate. We’ll have DBAs present attending training sessions, and you’ll also find us at Booth 3455 in Moscone West, where we'll be discussing our services and offering attendees a chance to win a GoPro camera.

Thanks for watching! We hope to see you in San Francisco!

The post What to Expect at Oracle OpenWorld this Year [VIDEO] appeared first on Remote DBA Experts.

Working Capital and Inventory Management

Dylan's BI Notes - Sun, 2014-09-28 23:24
The importance of the inventory management can be best described via working capital management. Cash is the blood of the company. Cash conversion cycle is measured as ( ( Account Receivables + Inventory – Account Payables )  / (Total Revenue / 365) These Youtube videos from Mark West from Redstack Analytics describes this CCC metric very […]
Categories: BI & Warehousing

Focus on #WorkLifeBalance at Oracle OpenWorld

David Haimes - Sun, 2014-09-28 23:16

I promised my 9 year old son that I would run the school 5K fun run with him, little did I know it would clash with Oracle OpenWorld.  I had a 5k run at 10am in Belmont and then a presentation to the OAUG GL Special Interest Group at 11am 20 mile sNorth in San Francisco.  I was worried about the pace my son could do but we managed to average 9.5 minute miles even with a stop to tie a shoe lace and a lot of traffic of all ages and speeds.  We had just enough time snap the picture below and then he went for the pancake breakfast with the rest of his friends and I ran another half mile to my car and headed to the Moscone Center.  No time to change and straight up on stage, with 10 minutes to spare before I was due to speak.  After that I caught up with a colleague who’s here from the UK over lunch and was home in time to upgrade my son’s home minecraft server to 1.8, write a blog and check on my demos for tomorrow’s Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) EXPO.

Dolphin Dash

Only one of us got to stay for the pancake breakfast

OOW14

No time to change, straight on stage and waiting to present.

later this evening I was pleased to see this tweet from Steve Miranda, our EVP who is also balancing his heavy workload at OpenWorld with family commitments too.

Steve makes time for family too.

Steve makes time for family too.

So all in all a good day, here’s hoping the rest of the week is just as enjoyable.


Categories: APPS Blogs

Supply Chain Questions

Dylan's BI Notes - Sun, 2014-09-28 22:42
The key question are about inventory and orders. What is our inventory status? by product and by location? Do we have enough inventory on hand and in process to meet customer demand? How can we maximize customer satisfaction while minimizing cost and size of inventory on hand? Both over stocking and under stocking are bad […]
Categories: BI & Warehousing

Documentum upgrade project: D2-Client and missing icons

Yann Neuhaus - Sun, 2014-09-28 19:49

The new D2-Client does not correctly display the icon for some formats. This usually happens when the icon.css is not up to date based on the content format in the repository. The solution is to find these formats and update the icon.css.

Here is the solution in three simple steps:

 

1) Find all formats described in icon.css

 

grep -B1 formats icon.css | cut -f1 -d"{" | grep SPAN | cut -f2 -d. > format.txt

 

icon.css is located on the application server under"...\\webapps\\D2-Client\\styles\\defaults\\css"

 

2) Find which format in the repository is not defined in icon.css using a dql query

Use the value in format.txt from previous step to build the dql query:

 

select distinct a_content_type from dm_document(all)
where a_content_type not in
('unknown',
'blank',
'crtext',
'text',
'mactext',
'pdftext',
'pdf',
.... .
....
'vsd1Large',
'vsd2Large',
'vsd3Large',
'vsd4Large')

 

3) Update icon.css with the missing formats

Let's take an example: For msw2007, I added:

 

SPAN.msw2007 {  BACKGROUND-IMAGE: url(/D2-Client/servlet/GetResource/images/icons/formats/doc-small.gif) }

 

Some stuff on my mind, September 28, 2014

DBMS2 - Sun, 2014-09-28 18:21

1. I wish I had some good, practical ideas about how to make a political difference around privacy and surveillance. Nothing else we discuss here is remotely as important. I presumably can contribute an opinion piece to, more or less, the technology publication(s) of my choice; that can have a small bit of impact. But I’d love to do better than that. Ideas, anybody?

2. A few thoughts on cloud, colocation, etc.:

  • The economies of scale of colocation-or-cloud over operating your own data center are compelling. Most of the reasons you outsource hardware manufacture to Asia also apply to outsourcing data center operation within the United States. (The one exception I can think of is supply chain.)
  • The arguments for cloud specifically over colocation are less persuasive. Colo providers can even match cloud deployments in rapid provisioning and elastic pricing, if they so choose.
  • Surely not coincidentally, I am told that Rackspace is deemphasizing cloud, reemphasizing colocation, and making a big deal out of Open Compute. In connection with that, Rackspace has pulled back from its leadership role in OpenStack.
  • I’m hearing much more mention of Amazon Redshift than I used to. It seems to have a lot of traction as a simple and low-cost option.
  • I’m hearing less about Elastic MapReduce than I used to, although I imagine usage is still large and growing.
  • In general, I get the impression that progress is being made in overcoming the inherent difficulties in cloud (and even colo) parallel analytic processing. But it all still seems pretty vague, except for the specific claims being made for traction of Redshift, EMR, and so on.
  • Teradata recently told me that in colocation pricing, it is common for floor space to be everything, with power not separately metered. But I don’t think that trend is a big deal, as it is not necessarily permanent.
  • Cloud hype is of course still with us.
  • Other than the above, I stand by my previous thoughts on appliances, clusters and clouds.

3. As for the analytic DBMS industry:

  • Concurrency is still a challenge. But otherwise …
  • … great SQL query performance isn’t something to get excited about any more, especially in immature systems.
  • Be careful about systems that have great performance when intermediate result sets fit into RAM, but not when they spill to disk. In particular, watch for this problem in the Hadoop/Spark world.
  • Vendors are getting better about ANSI SQL coverage (SQL 99 Analytics, windowing, etc. …)
  • “Runs on Hadoop” isn’t an exciting claim unless you can mix and match SQL and generic Hadoop processing in the same jobs against the same data, even though lesser forms of SQL/Hadoop integration might also with help some aspects of TCO (Total Cost of Ownership).
  • More generally, what’s needed is:
    • The ability to mix SQL and other kinds of analytic processing.
    • The ability to mix traditional tabular data, JSON, and log data.
    • The ability to mix data in place with data that’s trickling/streaming in.

4. Meanwhile, the analytic ease of use story remains popular, in business intelligence and predictive analytics/data science alike. Marketers typically oversimplify it to their own detriment, however, just as they do performance stories.

5. On the short-request side:

  • NoSQL is still going gangbusters.
  • NewSQL still isn’t, except that I haven’t talked with MemSQL for a while and they were doing well when I did.
  • Transparent sharding has stagnated as a business, good technology notwithstanding, and the vendors are pivoting.

6. Finally, one vendor note — Sharmila assures me by brief email that things are going gangbusters at ClearStory. This is unsurprising, as ClearStory exemplifies several trends I believe in, including robust analytic stacks, strong data navigation, Spark, and the incorporation of broad varieties of data.

And of course ClearStory also empowers business analysts to make do without IT involvement, like the other cool analytic kids also do.

Categories: Other

Partner Webcast – Oracle NoSQL key-value database

The Oracle NoSQL Database is a horizontally scaled, Key-Value database for Web Services and Cloud, designed specifically to provide highly reliable, scalable and available data storage across a...

We share our skills to maximize your revenue!
Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 – In the middle of it…

Marco Gralike - Sun, 2014-09-28 10:50
It’s funny this might be one of the first time in years that my strange…

Oracle Exalytics X4-4 - Bigger, Better, Stronger

Look Smarter Than You Are - Sun, 2014-09-28 10:49
X4-4 - Same price as the X3-4 but with more powerThe big announcement about it is today at OpenWorld (it would be awesome if they mentioned it during the Intel keynote tonight), but the Exalytics X4-4 is actually available now.  It's the same price as the X3-4 ($175,000 at list not including software, maintenance, tax, title, license, yada yada).  This does mean the X3 is - effective immediately - no longer available, but then again, since the new one is the same price, I'm not sure why anyone would want the older one.  No word yet on if you can upgrade an X3 to an X4, but since they did offer an upgrade kit from X2 to X3 (though I never heard of anyone buying it), I'm guessing there will be one for those wanting to make an X3 into an X4.
X4-4 SpecsThe main improvement over the X3 is the number of cores: it's still 4 Intel chips, but those chips all now have 15 cores on them, meaning the X4 has 60 cores compared to the X3's 40 cores.  Here are the important details:

  • 4 Intel Xeon E7-8895v2 processors running at 2.8 - 3.6 GHz
  • 8 - 60 cores (capacity on demand, more on this in a second)
  • 2 TB of RAM
  • 2.4 TB of PCI flash
  • 7.2 TB of hard disk running at 10K RPMs (not that fast these days)
  • 2 Infiniband ports running at 40 Gb/s
  • 4 Ethernet ports running at up to 10 Gb/s
Cool Thing 1: Variable Speed & Cores
You probably heard about this last July.  Oracle worked with Intel to design a line of their Xeon E7-889x chips specifically for Oracle.  What we didn't realize until we saw it show up on the X4 spec sheet was that the chips were going in the Exalytics X4.  Simply put, on the fly, Exalytics can vary how many cores it uses and when it's fewer cores, the speed goes up.  If it's running 15 cores per chip, Intel sets the speed to 2.8 GHz.  If it's only using 2 cores per chip the speed goes all the way to 3.6 GHz (a GHz is one billion clock ticks per second).

But wait, you math geniuses say.  Isn't 3.6 * 2 less than 2.8 * 15 (so why wouldn't Oracle just always leave all 60 cores on at the slower speed)?  Well, yes, if you're actually using all those cores, and this is where you know the chip was apparently designed for Essbase (though it did premiere in Exadata first).  As much as I love my Essbase, there are still transactions that end up single threading (or using far less than the available cores on the box).
Say I'm running a massive allocation and despite my best efforts (and FIXPARALLEL), it's still single threading or running at 8 CPUs or fewer.  In this case, Exalytics is now smart enough to talk to those impressive new E7-8895v2 chips, scale down to as few cores as are actually needed, and in the process, up the clock speed for the remaining cores.  Take that, commodity hardware.  This really is the killer feature that makes Exalytics do something no other server running Essbase can do.
On a side note, Intel seems to be dropping the power on the non-used cores to nearly zero when not in use meaning the power consumption of your Exalytics box actually lowers on-demand.  So if your boss won't sign off on your new Exalytics X4, tell her she hates the planet.
Cool Thing 2: You Don't Need BIFSPer the current Engineered Systems Price List (buried down in note 13), you longer have to purchase BIFS (BI Foundation Suite) to buy Exalytics (either the X4 or T5).  You can now own BIFS, OBIEE, Essbase+, or Hyperion Planning+ without having to get a VP to sign off for a special exemption.  That's right, Planning people preferring to purchase pure premium power, you can now buy Exalytics.  With this change, I presume that any new Planning customer looking for the best user experience will be buying Exalytics X4 along with Planning.
Also buried in the footnotes, you apparently can now buy Exalytics for as few as 20 named users.  Last time I checked (and I don't read every edition of the footnotes, haters who think I have no life), the minimum was 100 named users.
What's Next: HFM on ExalyticsWe heard about it on the opening developer's day at Kscope: HFM should finally run on Exalytics in version 11.1.2.4 (which we're hoping to see by the end of 2014).  I'm not sure if it will run on both the T5 (Solaris) and the X4 (Linux) by year-end, but Linux is almost a given.  That said, I don't work for Oracle, so don't base any buying decisions on the belief that HFM will definitely run on the X4.  Just when it happens, be pleasantly surprised that you can now consolidate all your major Oracle Business Analytics apps together.
So any T5 news?  Not at the moment. It's still available running it's 128 cores with 4 TB of RAM (and other cool things) so if you're looking for major horsepower and server consolidation, look to the T5.
I'll be updating this post after the OpenWorld keynote to include any new Exalytics news but if you hear any other Exalytics updates in the meantime, post it in the comments.
Categories: BI & Warehousing

BNB is participating in Oracle OpenWorld 2014

Javier Delgado - Sun, 2014-09-28 10:17
BNB is taking part in Oracle Open World 2014, the most important event for the Oracle customers, partners and employees ecosystem at a global scale. The event is starting today at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, September 28th and will close on October 2nd.

Up to 50.000 people will attend the event, which will involve more than 2.000 presentations. BNB participates as an Oracle Gold Partner, and we will be focusing on PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, Fusion and Taleo, while also looking at new trends on Big Data, Business Intelligence and Internet of Things.

As the event progress, I will be posting my impressions. This is my first Oracle Open World and it's all very exiting!

PS: Follow us under #BNBOOW hashtag.

BNB is participating in Oracle OpenWorld 2014

Javier Delgado - Sun, 2014-09-28 10:15
BNB is taking part in Oracle Open World 2014, the most important event for the Oracle customers, partners and employees ecosystem at a global scale. The event is starting today at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, September 28th and will close on October 2nd.

Up to 50.000 people will attend the event, which will involve more than 2.000 presentations. BNB participates as an Oracle Gold Partner, and we will be focusing on PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, Fusion and Taleo, while also looking at new trends on Big Data, Business Intelligence and Internet of Things.

As the event progress, I will be posting my impressions. This is my first Oracle Open World and it's all very exiting!

OOW 2014: ACE Director Briefing

Doug Burns - Sun, 2014-09-28 05:41

Disclosure: I'm attending Openworld at the invitation of the OTN ACE Director program who are paying for my flights, hotel and conference fee. My employer has helpfully let me attend on work time, as well as sending other team mates because they recognise the educational value of attending. Despite that, all of the opinions expressed in these posts are, as usual, all my own.

The first day of the ACE D briefing was a bit of a wipe-out for me as I had so much catching up on bits and pieces of work and personal email to do, having arrived very late the previous night, although I still managed to spend some valuable time catching up with friends of the Oak and non-Oak variety as well as hearing some useful info from various Product Managers. I was gutted to have missed Thomas Kurian's briefing session because, as I heard later, it was as splendid as usual. I think some of the enjoyment comes from people's fascination with how on top of things he is, talking at all sorts of technical and non-technical levels over a very wide portfolio. That's pretty much how I remember the last few briefings.

Despite the inevitable arrival of jet lag screwing up my sleep, I've been able to enjoy day two much more (once I'd absorbed some light-hearted wind-ups about my disappearing act). Today was always going to be the most enjoyable for me anyway as the agenda was more database-centric.

It kicked off with a session on the current state of play of MySQL which I must admit I've almost forgotten about (conspiracy theorists will enjoy that) but seems to be ticking along quite nicely with incremental performance and functionality improvements although the presenters were keen to point out that MySQLs forte is not it's functionality so much as it's ubiquity in the web area, given it's part of the LAMP stack. Like a lot of the presentations, it might not have been about something I use day to day but was very enjoyable keeping in touch with other technologies.

Next was an informal conversation with Bob Evans, the Chief Communications Officer, which covered a wide variety of subjects with the usual direct and critical approach I've come to expect from the ACE Directors in attendance (you might be surprised!), raising concerns about the interface between Oracle Sales and their shared customers. I was disappointed to hear that there seems to be a pattern of scheduling local sales events at the same time as Oracle ACE tour events. Seems pretty daft to me. (Another one for the conspiracy theorists, I suppose.)

Then Gene Eun gave us an update on the Oracle Database Cloud Service. Although I still feel Oracle are way behind the curve on this, I don't think that necessarily means they can't make up ground, as they have in the past, but I think the most important message for me was a reinforcement of an answer to a question I asked last year. There's no reason why people can't use the same technology to run their own on-premise cloud and, working in Finance as I seem to have done for a while, the most realistic implementations I can imagine are hybrids of onsite and offsite infrastructure to cope with regulatory requirements whilst still gaining the benefits of offsite deployment where that makes most sense.

I didn't spend so much time drinking coffee in the Oracle canteens this year, but I did manage to have an enjoyable catch-up with Uri Shaft, a true development geek who always has interesting thoughts both on those technologies he is or has been involved with, but also other development areas that he has nothing to do with! Never a man short on opinions on software and a truly nice guy. Sadly, the regular JB catch-up no longer exists and that Maria Colgan moves in entirely different circles these days! (That would be a joke, folks, and I'm looking forward to light refreshments and chat when she's in Singapore soon.)

Speaking of Maria, she was part of the presentation team for the two hour Oracle Database Development Update, which is one of the key sessions for most attendees. Penny Avril and Maria Colgan kicked off with an all-too-short session discussing release plans and a little about In-Memory Option but I was left with the feeling that, having put so much work into getting the In-Memory stuff ready, it's now a case of consolidating the work and delivering product. i.e. I didn't notice any earth-shattering announcements in the database area but I suppose last year made up for that!

So most of the session was focused on two non-RDBMS areas. George Lumpkin on documents in the database and JSON stuff which was one of those - interesting but not something I'm likely to work with for a while presentations. 

Dan McLary was almost certainly the speaker of the day as he delved into Oracle's BigData/Hadoop offering in good detail but with passion and a refreshing honesty about where Oracle fit into this field which still managed to be very positive about where Oracle are taking it. As he pointed out, the combination of being able to query anywhere (different data sources and technologies) with the functional richness of Oracle's SQL implementation is likely to be a pretty compelling offering. 

It was an afternoon full of good presenters likely to keep the jet-lagged awake (although both Connor McDonald and I were struggling badly by this stage) like David Peake who covered Apex and a new website - Learning SQL - to help people, erm, learn SQL. I think we'll be hearing more about this in the upcoming week.

Wim Coekaerts is always popular with a small chunk of the ACED crowd and was again with his usual Linux and VM update, an informal conversation delivered without notes or slides which hit mainly on the areas that the attendees wanted to discuss. In a neat piece of agenda symmetry, he pointed out the presence of DTrace probes for MySQL running on OEL, as he discussed in his recent blog post.

By now we were running late and beers were beckoning, so Steve Feuerstein did a great job of just about keeping people going with his discussion of Oracle's attempts to reengage and energise the traditional Oracle SQL and PL/SQL technologies we know and love with a new (and quite possibly younger!) audience - YesSQL! Keep an eye out for what is likely to be a fun and different session with Steven and Tom Kyte and other special guests at 18:30 on Monday in Moscone South 103.

... and with that all wrapped up, it was time for beers and the bus into the city. The hotel check-in wasn't the car crash it usually is, but by the time it was all done and dusted there was just time for a few more drinks and since then it has been sleep, sleep, sleep for me :-(

The usual thanks to the OTN team for putting together a varied and interesting briefing, which must be a really tough task when the Dev folks are all up to their eyebrows preparing for next week. Great work!

I'm hoping just an hour or two more and I'll be bright and breezy for Sunday, the first proper conference day. With my apparently new-found energy and dashing good looks (courtesy of Singapore), I'm expecting the week to be a good one!