Oracle AppsLab

Subscribe to Oracle AppsLab feed
Driving Innovation
Updated: 2 hours 33 min ago

How We Go Through Our Day

Thu, 2016-03-24 03:31

Earlier this month, our strategy and roadmap eBook was released. In it, you’ll find all the whys, wherefores, whats and hows that drive the Simplicity-Mobility-Extensibility design philosophy we follow for Oracle Cloud Applications.

The eBook is free, as in beer, and it’s a great resource if you find yourself wondering why we do what we do. Download it now.

In said (free) eBook, you’ll find this slide.

HowWeGoThroughOurDay

Guessing I’ve seen our fearless leader and GVP Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley) present this slide 20-some times around the World, and each time he asks, “What’s the first thing you do in the morning?”

Inevitably, 90% of the audience says pick up my phone. He’ll then ask how many people in the audience have only one computing device, two, three or more? Overwhelmingly, audiences have three or more.

These are international audiences, so there’s no geographical bias.

I love this slide because it succinctly portrays the modern work experience, spent across devices, all day long. As Jeremy says, we have the ability to work from the moment we open our eyes to wake to the moment we close them for sleep.

You can debate whether that is a good thing or not, but the fact is our users are mobile and device-happy. They use whatever device fits their needs at any given time.

And devices keep changing. For instance, this slide had a head-mounted display glyph at one point to represent a Google Glass-like device, and the smartwatch looked like a Pebble, not an Apple Watch.

That’s where we (@theappslab) come in; we’re always reading the tea leaves, leaning into the future, trying to anticipate what users will want next so we can skate to where the puck will be.

Mixing metaphors is fun.

Anyway, download the free eBook and learn about the OAUX strategy and roadmap and keep reading here to see where we fit.Possibly Related Posts:

GDC 2016 – Part 2: The State of VR

Wed, 2016-03-23 03:31

VR is big and is going to be really big for the game industry, and you could feel it in the air at the GDC 2016. For the first time, GDC added two days of VR development-focused events and sessions, and most of VR sessions were packed – the lines to the VR sessions were long, even 30 minutes before the sessions, and many people could be turned away. The venue for VR sessions had to be changed to double the capacities for day 2.

There was lots of interest and enthusiasm among game designers, developers and business guys, as VR represents a brand new direction, new category, and new genre for games!

It is still at the dawn of VR games, with hardware, software, contents, approaches, etc. starting to come together. Based on what I learned during GDC, I’d like to summarize the state of various aspects of VR development.

1. VR Headset

This is the first thing that comes to our mind when we talk about VR, right? After all, the immersive experience is cast to our minds while covering ourselves with the VR headset. There are a couple VR headsets available on market, and slew of VR headsets to be debuted very soon.

VR Headset

VR Headset

From $10 Google cardboard, to $100 Samsung Gear VR, to >$1000 custom rig, the price of a VR headset is on a wide spectrum, and so are capability and performance. Most people who want to get hold of VR will likely choose one among Samsung Gear VR, PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift, and HTC Vive. Here I will do a brief comparison so you have some ideas of what you can get.

Samsung Gear VR

It uses specific Samsung phones to show VR content, so the performance is low as it is limited by the phone hardware, usually at 60fps. It has a built-in touchpad for input, but you may also use an optional gamepad. It has no wire to connect to PC, so you can spin around on a chair and not worry about tangling yourself. It has no position tracking.

If you own a Samsung S6/S7, or Edge version, why not get the Gear VR to experience the magic? $99 seems to be really inexpensive for any new gadget.  Even if you have non-Samsung phone, you can still slip it into the rig and use Gear VR as a advanced version of Cardboard viewer. Of course, you will not have control pad capability.

PlayStation VR

It uses PS4 to run VR games, so it has real game-grade hardware to run VR content at 120fps, with consistent high performance. For inputs, it has a gamepad and tracked controllers, like holding a beacon with light bulb. It has small position tracking.

The unique part with PSVR is that it is supposed to play with other regular gamers on TV screens, making it a party game in your living room. The person with PSVR will have immersive feeling in the game, while others on TV can fight with or play along with the guy (a game character with VR headset) in a game. If you have a PS4 at home, then shelling out another $399 seems to be reasonable for decent experience of VR games. But you’ll have to wait until October 2016 to buy one, right before the holiday season.

Oculus Rift

This is expected to be a high-end VR headset, with games running on a powerful Oculus-ready computer. It will have very high performance, showing VR content at 120fps or higher. It will have a wire connected to computer, so that would limit you not to spin too much of 360 degree. It has small position tracking too. It does not come cheap at price $599, but well you can get it pretty much now in March.

HTC Vive

It is considered to be even higher spec than Oculus Rift. It will require a muscular PC, with motion sensor and motion controllers attached to it, and it will deliver very high performance for VR games. It has tracked hands for input, and provides room-scale position tracking, which is above everyone else. To designers / developers, this room-scale tracking capability may give another dimension for experiments.

It costs $799, because it is high-end hardware and bundled with a bunch of bells and whistles. And you can expect to get it in April if you pre-order one now.

Others

HoloLens is always another interesting device for VR/AR. Also rumor has it that Google is building a VR headset too – will be much more powerful than its Cardboard version.

2. Game Engine for VR

Recent trend indicates that Game Engine companies are making it easier (or free) for people to access game engine software and develop game on it. There were quite number of sessions covering detail topics on specific game engine, but based on my impression, here is the list to try out.

Unity 5.3  by Unity Technologies – It has a free version (Personal Edition) with full features. I believe it is most popular and widely-used game engine, with cross platform deployment to full range of mobile, VR, desktop, Web, Console and TV. Also many of the  alt.ctrl.GDC exhibits utilized Unity to create game for controllers to interact with.

Unreal Engine 4  by Epic Games – It is a sophisticated game engine used to develop some AAA games. They also showcased two VR games Bullet Train and Showdown. The graphics and visual effect looks astonishing.

Lumberyard game engine by Amazon

Lumberyard game engine by Amazon

Lumberyard by Amazon – It is a new entry to the engine game, but it is free with full source, meaning you can tweak the engine if necessary. It would be a good choice if developing online game, and no need to worry about hosting a robust game. I guess that’s where Amazon wants to get a share of the game. It is not supporting VR yet, but will add such support very soon.

3. Capture Device

For many VR games, designers/developers would just create virtual game world using game engine and other graphical software. But in order to show real world event inside VR world, you will need special video camera, which can take 360 degree, or spherical photos and videos.

Spherical Video Capture Device

Spherical Video Capture Device

Well, most of us may not have seen or used this type of camera, including me, and so I don’t have any opinions on them. I did use native Camera App on Android device to capture spherical photos, but it was difficult to take many shots and stitch them together.

Stereoscopic Video Capture Device

Stereoscopic Video Capture Device

A step further is the stereoscopic video capturing, which takes two photographs of the same object at slightly different angle to produce depth. These are high-end professional rigs, with many custom-built versions. The price range could easily go above $10k.

This area is still quite fluid, and not sure if it would ever go mainstream. Hope some consumer version in reasonable price range will become available, so we can produce some VR videos too.

4. Convention and Best Practice

With real VR game titles under 100 in total, people in the VR field are still trying to figure things out, and no clear convention has yet surfaced for designers, developers and players.

In some sessions, VR game designers and developers did share the lessons they have learned while producing their first several VR games, like interaction patterns, reality trade-off (representational, experiential, and interaction fidelity), and fidelity contract in terms of physics rule, affordance, narrative expectations. Audio (binaural audio) and visual effects will too help realize an immersive experience.

We shall see more and more “best practices” converging together with more research in VR psychology and UX, some conventions will emerge to put designers and players on the same page.

5. Area of Use

By far games is the most natural fit for VR experience, and the entire game industry is driving toward it. Cinematic VR will be another great fit, as ILM X Lab demonstrated in “Star Wars,” viewer may “attach” to different characters to experience various view points in the movie.

People also explored VR as a new way of storytelling in journalism, a new way of exercise for sports (e.g. riding stationary bike in gym feels much like driving Humvee car in war zone), and a new way of education, e.g. going into a machine and looking at the inner mechanism of an engine.

VR brings another aspect of artistic expression as new art media, challenges us to advance technology to a new frontier, and at the same time, provides us with great opportunities.

Things are just getting started!Possibly Related Posts:

VR Skeptic: Making VR Comfortable with Apple TV

Wed, 2016-03-23 01:36

We are still in the early days of virtual reality. Just as in the early days of manned flight, this is a time of experimentation.

flight_vs_VR

Current VR experiments resemble early manned flight experiments

What do we wear on our heads? Helmets? Goggles? Contact lenses? Or do we simply walk into a cave or dome or tank? What do we wear or hold in our hands? Game controllers? Wands? Glowing microphones? Bracelets, armbands, and rings? Or do we just flap our arms in the breeze? Do we sit? Stand? Walk on a treadmill? Ride a bike? Or do we wander about bumping into furniture and each other?

As a person who prefers to go through life in a reclining position, most of these options seem like too much bother. I have a hard time imagining how VR could become ubiquitous in the enterprise if employees have to constantly pull on complicated headgear, or tether themselves to some contraption, or fight for access to an expensive VR cave. VR in the workplace must be ergonomic, safe, and easy to use even before you’ve had your morning coffee.

Lately I’ve been enjoying VR content, goggle-free, from the comfort of my lazyboy using an Apple TV app called Littlstar. Instead of craning my head back and forth, I just slide my thumb to and fro on the Apple remote. I can fly through the air and swim with the dolphins without working up a sweat or stepping on a cat.

Selection screen for VR content on Littstar Apple TV app

Selection screen for VR content on Littstar Apple TV app

To be clear: watching VR content on TV is NOT real VR. It’s nowhere near as immersive. But the content is the same and the experience is surprisingly good. Navigation is actually better: because it is effortless I am more inclined to keep looking around.

The Apple remote strikes me as the perfect VR controller. It is light as a feather, easy to hold, lets you pan and drag and click and zoom, and you can operate it blindfolded.

Watching VR content on TV also makes it easier to share. Small groups of people can navigate a virtual space together in comfort. One drawback: it’s fun to be the person “driving,” but abrupt movements can make everyone else a tad queazy.

What works in the living room might also work well at a desk – or in a meeting room. TVs are already replacing whiteboards and projection screens in many workplaces. And the central innovation of the fourth generation, Apple TV, the TV app, creates a marketplace to evolve new forms of group interaction. I expect there will be a whole class of enterprise TV apps someday.

For all these reasons, I have been pushing to create Apple TV app counterparts to the VR apps we are starting to build in the AppsLab. TV counterparts could make it easier to show prototypes in design meetings and customer demos. I feel validated by Tawny’s (@iheartthanniereport from GDC that Sony has adopted a similar philosophy.

Orqcle_AppleTV_VR

Screenshot from an early AppsLab Apple TV app

Thanks to one of our talented developers, Os (@vaini11a), we already have one such prototype. It doesn’t do much yet; we are just figuring out how to display desktop screens in a VR environment. With goggles on I can use the VR app to spin from screen to screen in my office chair and look down at my feet to change settings. With the Apple TV counterpart app, I can do exactly the same thing without moving anything other than my thumb.

It’s still too early to predict how ubiquitous VR might become in the workplace or how we will interact with it. But TV apps, or something like them, may become one way to view virtual worlds in comfort.Possibly Related Posts:

GDC 2016 – Part 1: Event and Impression

Tue, 2016-03-22 03:34

Tawny (@iheartthannie) and I attended the 30th Edition of GDC – Game Developers Conference. As shown in the Tawny’s daily posts, there were lots of fun events, engaging demos, and interesting sessions, that we simply could not cover them all. With 10 to 30 sessions going on at any time slots, I wished to have multiple “virtual mes” to attend some of them simultaneously. However, with only one “real me,” I still managed to attend a large number of sessions, mostly 30-minute sessions to cover more topics at a faster pace.

Game Developers Conference 2016

GDC 2016

Unlike Tawny’s posts that give you in-depth looks into many of the sessions, I will try to summarize the information and take-aways in two posts: Part 1 – Event and Impression; Part 2 – The State of VR. This post will cover event overview and general impression.

1. Flash Backward

Flash Backward - 30 Years of Making Games

Flash Backward – 30 Years of Making Games

After two days of VR sessions, this flashback kicked off the GDC Game portion with a sense of nostalgia, flashing games like Pac-Man and Minesweeper, evolving into console games, massive multi-player games, social games (FarmVille), mobile games (Angry Birds), and onto VR games.

GDC has been running for 30 years, and many of the attendants were not even born yet that time. The Flashback started with Chris Crawford, the founder of GDC, and concluded with Palmer Luckey, the Oculus dude, who is 23, with not much for flashback, but only looking forward to the new generation of games in VR. He will be back in 20 years for the retrospective

New Content on Our Oracle.com Page

Mon, 2016-03-21 16:18

Back in September, our little team got a big boost when we launched official content under the official Oracle.com banner.

I’ve been doing this job for various different organizations at Oracle for nine years now, and we’ve always existed on the fringe. So, having our own home for content within the Oracle.com world is a major deal, further underlining Oracle’s increased investment in and emphasis on innovation.

Today, I’m excited to launch new content in that space, which, for the record is here:

www.oracle.com/webfolder/ux/applications/successStories/emergingTech.html

We have a friendly, short URL too:

tinyurl.com/appslab

The new content focuses on the methodologies we use for research, design and development. So you can read about why we investigate emerging technologies and the strategy we employ, and then find out how we go about executing that strategy, which can be difficult for emerging technologies.

Sometimes, there are no users yet, making standard research tacits a challenge. Equally challenging is designing an experience from scratch for those non-existent users. And finally, building something quickly requires agility, lots of iterations and practice.

All-in-all, I’m very happy with the content, and I hope you find it interesting.

Not randomly, here are pictures of Noel (@noelportugal) showing the Smart Office in Australia last month.

RS3660_ORACLE 332

RS3652_ORACLE 419

The IoT Smart Office, just happens to be the first project we undertook as an expanded team in late 2014, and we’re all very pleased with the results of our blended, research, design and development team.

I hope you agree.

Big thanks to the writers, Ben, John, Julia, Mark (@mvilroxk) and Thao (@thaobnguyen) and to Kathy (@klbmiedema) and Sarahi (@sarahimireles) for editing and posting the content.

In the coming months, we’ll be adding more content to that space so stay tuned.Possibly Related Posts:

GDC16 Day 5: The Good, The Bad, The Weird (Last Day)

Fri, 2016-03-18 22:43

bathroomWhen I first came to GDC, I didn’t know what to expect. I was delightfully surprised to use my first gender neutral restroom. The restroom had urinals and toilet seats. There was no fuss other than others who were standing to take a picture of the sign above. It felt surreal using the restroom next to a stranger who was not the same gender as I. The idea is a positive new way of thinking and fits perfectly with one of the themes of the conference: diversity.

In my last games user research round table, one of the topics we spent a lot of time on was sexism and how we could do our part to include underrepresented groups in our testing. One researcher began with a story about a female contractor he worked with to perform a market test on a new game. One screener question surprised him the most:

What gender do you identify as?
Male [Next question]
Female [Thank her for her time. Dismiss]

O-M-G. The team went back and forth with the contractor for 4 iterations before she agreed to change that question in the screener. Her reasoning were:

  • Females are not representative of his game’s audience. Wrong, females made up half of his previous game’s total audience.
  • Females are distracting. The males will flirt with the females during testing. Solution, have one day to test all female testers and another day to test all male testers.
  • Females don’t like competitive shooting games. Wrong, see first bullet point. As of March 2016, female preference for competitive games overlap with male preference 85%.

If your group of testers are all randomly chosen, but are all straight white males, is that a truly random sample? To build a game that is successful, it is important to test with a diverse group of people. Make sure that most if not all groups of your audience is represented in the sample. This will yield more diverse and insightful findings. You may have to change the language of your recruitment email to target different types of users.

For example, another researcher wanted a diverse pool gamers with little experience. His only screener was that they play games on a console for at least 6 hours a week. No genre of games were specified. He got a 60 year old grandma who played Uno over Xbox Live with her grandkids for 6–8 hours Saturday and Sunday. She took hours to get past level one, but because she was so meticulous and wanted to explore every aspect of the demo, she pointed out trouble spots in the game that most testers speeding through would miss!

Recently on our own screeners at The AppsLab, we ask participants what gender they identify with instead of bucketing them in male or female. It’s small, but a big step in the right direction toward equality.

hedgehog

UX practioners are like hedgehogs who just want to hug.

kitten

Other job roles on the team are like cuddly, don’t-touch-me, kittens.

The presence of UX

The presence of UX and user research has grown since last year. Developers and publishers recognize the importance of iteratively testing early and often. In the “Design of Everyday Games” talk with Christina Wodke the other day, she told the packed room that there was just 8 people in the same talk just the year before. From 8 to a packed room of hundred is a huge growth and a win for the user and for the industry!

Epic Games spoke about product misconceptions that makes it difficult to incorporate user experience into the pipeline. UX practitioners are like hedgehogs. We want to help by giving the extra hug it needs, but our quills aren’t perceived as soft enough. Our goal is to deliver the experience intended to the targeted audience, not change the design intent.

  • Misconception #1: UX is common sense. Actually, the human brain is filled with perception, cognitive and social biases that affect both the developers and the users.
  • Misconception #2: UX is another opinion. UX experts don’t give opinions. We provide an analysis based on our knowledge of the brain, past experience and available test data.
  • Misconception #3: There’s not enough resources for UX. We have resources for QA testing to ensure there are no technical bugs. Can we afford not to test for critical UX issues before shipping?

To incorporate UX into the pipeline, address product misconceptions. Don’t be afraid of each other, just talk. Open communication is the key to creativity and collaboration. Start with small wins to show your value by working with those who show some interest in the process. Don’t be a UX police and jump on every UX issue to start a test pipeline. Work together and measure the process.

Overall, I loved the conference. The week flew by quickly and I was able to get great insights from industry thought leaders. The GDC activity feed was bursting with notes from parallel talks. I fell in love with the community and am in awe that a conference of this size grew from a meeting in a basement 30 years go. I sure hope there is a UX track next year! I decided to end my week with a scary VR experience, Paranormal Activity VR. The focused on music and sound to drive the suspenseful narrative. Needless to say, I screamed and fell on my knees. It beats paying to go to a haunted maze every halloween.

Possibly Related Posts:

GDC16 Day 4: Demos & Player Motivations

Fri, 2016-03-18 02:13

Crowded early morning inside GDC Expo.

It’s official. All demos are booked for the week. Anyone not on the list is subjected to the standby line. I was lucky enough to score a 5:30pm demo for Bullet Train at the NVIDIA booth early this morning. When I walked by the line late in the evening, I found out that a lady had been waiting for at least an hour for her turn in the line.

Raymond (@yuhuaxie), one of our developers, took his luck to play games at the “no reservations accepted” Oculus store-like booth 30 minutes before the expo opened and still had to wait for almost an hour before he left the line for other session talks. Is it worth the hype? The wait? The fact that you’re crouching and screaming at something no one else can see?

Apparently so! One common sentiment I heard from others who finished playing the demo was that the experience was so amazing that they didn’t care about the friction to enjoy the 10–15 min in virtual reality! For Bullet Train, there had been several repeat visitors to play the fast-paced shooting game again and again!

Today, I had my chance to demo London Heist on the PS VR and Bullet Train on the Oculus Rift. Both are fast-paced shooting games. The head mount gear (HMD) for the PS VR is much more forgiving for those who wear glasses. The HMD wears similarly to a bike helmet, but with no straps to mess with. To adjust, you simply slide the viewer forward and back separate from the mounting. It’s much lighter compared to the other HMDs and breathes better. Here’s another game play of the demo I went through.

London Heist has simple interactions for a shooting game. The game first eases you in as you ride as a passenger with your buddy on the streets of London. You can sit there and get a chance to orient yourself with you new surroundings. Instead of practicing how to grab guns, I gulped down a 7up instead 

GDC16 Day 3: Another Day of Fun & Data!

Thu, 2016-03-17 01:17

Early morning view of the GDC16 Expo Hall.

The Expo opened today and will be open until the end of Friday! There was a lot to see and do! I managed to explore 1/3 of the space. Walking in, we have the GDC Store to the left and the main floor below the stairs. Upon entering the main floor, Unity was smack dab in the center. It had an impressive set up, but not as impressive as the Oculus area nor Clash of Kings.

Built to look like a store :O

Clash of Kings. The biggest booth of all booths. They brought the game to real life with hired actors!

There were a lot of demos you could play, with many different type of controllers. Everyone was definitely drinking the VR Kool-Aid. Because of the popularity of some of the sessions, reservations for a play session are strongly encouraged. Most, if not all of the sessions ,were already booked for the whole day by noon. I managed to reserve the PS VR play session for tomorrow afternoon by scanning a QR code to their scheduling app!

The main floor was broken up into pavilions with games by their respective counties. It was interesting to overhear others call their friends to sync up and saying “I’m in Korea.” Haha.

I spent the rest of the time walking around the floor and observing others play.

Fly like a bird! #birdly #GDC16 pic.twitter.com/oeHUnmfhgp

— Tawny (@iheartthannie) March 16, 2016

I did get a chance to get in line for an arcade ride! My line buddy and I decided to get chased by a T-Rex! We started flying in the air as a Pterodactyl. The gleeful flight didn’t last long. The T-Rex was hungry and apparently really wanted us for dinner. It definitely felt like we were running quickly, trying to get away.

Another simulation others tried that we didn’t was a lala land roller coaster. In this demo, players can actually see their hand on screen.

Waiting to try out sim arcade ride that senses your hands! Fairytale coaster ride w/ bunny companion in tow #GDC16 pic.twitter.com/Y8mqDs2ILg

— Tawny (@iheartthannie) March 16, 2016

Sessions & Highlights

Playstation VR. Sony discusses development concepts, design innovations and what PS VR is and is not. I personally liked the direction they are going for collaboration.

  • Design with 2 screens in mind. For console VR, you may be making 2 games in 1. One in VR and one on TV. You should consider doing this to avoid having one headset per player and to allow for multiplayer cooperation. Finding an art direction for both is hard. Keep it simple for good performance.
  • Make VR a fun and social experience. In a cooperative environment, you get 2 separate viewpoints of the same environment (mirroring mode) or 2 totally different screen views (separate mode). This means that innovation between competitive and Co-op mode is possible.

The AppsLab team and I have considered this possibility of a VR screen and TV screen experience as well. It’s great that this idea is validated by one of the biggest console makers.

A year of user engagement data. A year’s worth of game industry data, patterns and trends was the theme of all the sessions I attended today.

  • There are 185 million gamers in the US. Half are women.
    • 72 million are console gamers. Of those console owners the average age is ~30 years old.
    • There are 154 million mobile gamers. This is thanks to the rise of free-2-play games. Mobile accessibility has added diversity to the market and brought a new group of players. Revenues grew because of broad expansion. The average age for the mobile group is ~39.4 years old.
    • There are 61 million PC gamers thanks to the rise of Steam. These gamers tend to be younger at an average age of ~29.5yrs.
  • There are different motivations as to why people play games. There are two group of players: Core vs. casual players. Universally, the primary reason casual players play games is when they are waiting to pass time and as a relaxing activity.
  • There is great diversity within the mobile market. There is an obvious gender split between what females and males play casually. Females tend to like matching puzzle (Candy Crush), simulation and casino games while males tend to like competitive games like sport, shooter and combat city builder games.
  • When we look internationally, players in Japan have less desire to compete when playing games. Success of games based on cooperative games.
  • Most homes have a game console. In 2015, 51% of homes owned at least 2 game consoles. At the start of 2016, there was an increase of 40% in sales for current 8th generation game consoles (PS4, Xbox One, etc minus the Wii).
  • Just concentrating on mobile gamers, 71% play games on both their smart phone and tablet, 10% play only on their tablet.
  • Top factors leading to churn are lack of interest, failure to meet expectation and too much friction.
  • Aside from Netflix and maybe Youtube, Twitch gobbles up more prime time viewers, almost 700K concurrent views as of March 2016. Its viewership is increasing despite competition with the launch of YouTube Gaming.

Day 1 — User research round table. This was my first round table during GDC, and it’s nice to be among those within the same profession. We covered user research for VR, preventing bias and testing on kids! Experts provided their failures on these topics and offers suggestions.

  • Testing for Virtual Reality.
    • Provide players with enough time warming up in the new environment before asking them to perform tasks. Use the initial immersive exposure for to calibrate them.
    • Be ready to pull them out at any indication of nausea.
    • Use questionnaires to screen out individuals who easily get motion sickness.
    • It’s important to remember that people experience sickness for different reasons. It’s hard to eliminate all the variables. Some people can have vertigo or claustrophobia that’s not necessarily the fault of the VR demo. There is a bias toward that in media. People think they are going to be sick so they feel sick.
    • Do not ask people if they feel sick before the experience else you are biasing them to be sick.
    • Individuals are only more likely to feel sick if your game experience does not match their expectations. Some people feel sick no matter what.
    • One researcher tested 700–800 people in VR. Only 2 persons said that they felt sick. 7–8 said they felt uncomfortable.
    • An important questions to ask is “At what point do they feel sick?” If you get frequent reports at that point vs. Generalized reports, then you can do something to make the game better.
  • Bias.
    • Avoid bragging language. Keep questions neutral.
    • Separate yourself from the product.
    • Remember participants think that you are an authority. Offload instructions to the survey, rather than relay the instructions yourself. It’s going to bias the feedback.
    • Standardize the experiment. Give the same spiel.
    • The order of question is important.
    • Any single geographic region is going to introduce bias. Only screen out regions if you think culture is going to be an issue.
  • Testing with kids.
    • It’s better to test with 2 kids in a room. With kids, they are not good at verbalizing what they know and do not know. Having 2 kids allows you to see them verbalize their thoughts to each other as they ask questions and help each other through the game.
    • When testing a group of kids at once, assign the kids their station and accessories. Allowing them to pick will end up in a fight over who gets the pink controller.
    • Younger kids aren’t granular so allow for 2 clear options on surveys. A thumbs up and thumbs down works.
    • Limit kids to one sugary drink or you’ll regret it.

Possibly Related Posts:

GDC16 Day 2: Highlights & Trends

Wed, 2016-03-16 02:50

Just like yesterday, the VR sessions were very popular. Even with the change to bigger rooms, lines for popular VR talks would start at least 20 minutes before the session started. The longest line I was in snaked up and down the hallway at least 4 times. The wait was well worth it though!

Today was packed. Many sessions overlapped one another. Wish I could have cloned 3 of myself

GDC16 Day 1: Daily Round Up

Tue, 2016-03-15 01:54

Hello everyone! I wrapped up the first day at the Games Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco! It’s the first Monday after daylight savings so a morning cup of joe in Moscone West was a welcomed sight!

gdc_logo

First Thoughts

Wow! All of the VR sessions were very popular and crowded. In the morning, I was seated in the overflow room for the HTC Vive session. Attendees were lucky to be able to go to 2 VR sessions back-to-back. There would be lines wrapping around the halls and running into other lines. By the afternoon, when foot traffic was at its highest, it was easy to get confused as to which line belonged to which session. Luckily, the organizers took into account the popularity of the VR sessions and moved it to the larger rooms for the next 4 days!

On the third floor, there was a board game area where everyone could play the latest board game releases like Pandemic Legacy and Mysterium as well as a VR play area where everyone could try out the Vive and other VR games.

Sessions & Take Aways

I sat in on 6 sessions:

  • A Year in Roomscale: Design Lessons from the HTC Vive and Beyond.
    •  You are not building a game, but an experience. Players are actually doing something actively with their hands vs. a game controller.
    • There are 3 questions that players ask when they are starting a VR experience that should be addressed:
      • (a) Who am I?
      • (b) What am I supposed to do?
      • (c) How do I interact with the environment?
    • Permissability. New players always ask when they are allowed to interact with something, but there are safety issues when they get too comfortable. One developer told a story about how a player actually tried to dive headfirst into a pool while wearing a VR device!
    • Don’t have music automatically playing when they enter the game. It’s not natural in the real world. It’s better to have a boom box and have them turn on the music instead. In addition, audio is still hard to do perfectly. Players expect perfect audio by default. If they pick up a phone, they expect to hear it out of 1 ear, not both.
  • Social Impact: Leveraging Community for Monetization, User Acqusition and Design.
    • Social Whales (SW) have high social value thus have the highest connection to other players and are key to a high ROI . SWs makes it easy for other players to connect with one another.
    • There are 3 standard profiles that players fall under:
      • (a) The atypical social whales that always want the best things.
      • (b) The trendsetter, the one who wants to unite and lead.
      • (c) The trend spotter, the players who want to be a part of something.
    • When a social whale leaves a games, ROI falls and other players leave. This is because that 2nd degree connection is gone. To keep players from leaving, it’s important to have game mechanics that addresses the following player needs:
      • (a) Players want to belong.
      • (b) Players want recognition as a valuable member.
      • (c) Players want their in-game group to be recognized as the best vs. other groups.
  • Menus Suck.
    • A very interesting talk on rethinking how players access key menu items in VR.
    • Have a following object like a cat! Touching different parts of the object will allow you to select different things. It’s much easier than walking back and forth between a menu and what you have to do.
      • Job Simulator uses retro cartridges for menu selection.
    •  Create menu shortcuts with the player’s body. Have the user pull things out of different parts of their head (below).
    •  Eating as an interaction. In job simulator you can eat a cake marked with an “Exit” to exit the game. The cake changes to another dessert item marked with an “Are you sure?” to ensure the exit.
  • Improving Playtesting through Workshops Focusing on Exploring.
    • For games, we are experience testing (playtesting) not performing a usability test.
    • For games, especially for VR, comfort comes first. Right after that it’s ease of use.
    • When exploring desired experiences for a game, create a composition box to ensure you get ideas from all views of your development team.
    • When observing play, look for actions (e.g. vocalizations, gestures) as well as for changes in posture and focus.
  • The Tower of Want.
    • Learn critical questions our designs must answer to engage players over the long term.
    • Follow the “I want to..” and “so I can…” framework to unearth player’s short term and long term goals. Instead of asking why 5 times like we do in user research, we ask then to complete the framework’s “so I can…” sentence (e.g. I want to get good grades so I can get into college…so I can get a good job…so I can make a lot of money…so I can buy a house).
    • The framework creates a ladder of motivations that incentivizes a player to complete each game level in that ladder daily.
  • Cognitive Psychology of Virtual Reality: Basics, Problems and Tips.
    • Psychology is the physics of VR.
    • Use redirected walking to keep players within the same space.
    • Design for optical flow. Put shadows over areas where users are not concentrating on. It’ll help with dizziness.
    • Players underestimate depth by up to 50%.
      • Add depth by adding transitional rooms (portals). This helps ease the players into their new environment.
    • Players can see a maximum of 6 meters ahead of them for 3D.
      • In their peripherals, they can only see 2D.
      • Design with the mind that 20–30% of the population has problems with stereoscopic vision.

Possibly Related Posts:

See You at SXSW 2016

Fri, 2016-03-11 09:59

sxsw If you happen to be in Austin this weekend for SXSWi, look for Osvaldo (@vaini11a), me (@noelportugal) and friend of the ‘Lab Rafa (@rafabelloni).

We will be following closely all things UX, IoT, VR, AI. Our schedules are getting full with some great sessions and workshops. Check back in a week or so to read some of our impressions!Possibly Related Posts:

The Anki Overdrive Car Project

Mon, 2016-03-07 02:07

At the end of 2015, our team was wrapping up projects that would be shown at the main Oracle conference, Oracle OpenWorld.

As with every OOW, we like to come up with a fun project that shows attendees our spirit of innovation by building cool projects within Oracle.

The team was thinking about building something cool with kids’ racetracks. We all were collectively in charge of looking for alternatives, so we visited a toy store to get ideas and see products that already existed out there.

We looked pretty cool racetracks but none of them suited our needs for functionality and of course, we didn’t have enough time to invest on modifying some of them.

So, searching through internet someone came up with Anki OVERDRIVE cars, yes, that product that was announced back in 2013 at Apple WWDC keynote. To sum up, Anki provides a racetrack that includes flexible plastic magnets tracks that can be chained together and to allow for any racetrack configuration, rechargeable cars that have an optical sensor underneath to keep the car on the track, a lot of fun features like all kinds of virtual weapons, cars upgrades, etc., a companion app for both Android and iOS platform to operate the cars and a software development kit (SDK).

thumb_IMG_1626_1024

For us, it was exactly what we were looking for. But now we needed to find a way to control the cars without using the companion app because, you know, that was boring and we wanted more action and go one step further.

So after discussing different approaches, I suggested to control cars with Myo gesture control armband that basically is a wireless touch-free, wearable gesture control and motion device. We had Myo armband already, but we hadn’t played with it much. Good thing that Myo band has an SDK too, so we had everything ready to build a cool demo

Is the Mi Band the Harbinger of Affordable #fashtech?

Tue, 2016-03-01 10:15

So, here’s a new thing I’ve noticed lately, customizable wearables, specifically the Xiaomi Mi Band (#MiBand), which is cheap and completely extensible.

This happens to be Ultan’s (@ultan) new fitness band of choice, and coincidentally, Christina’s (@ChrisKolOrcl) as well. Although both are members of Oracle Applications User Experience (@usableapps), neither knew the other was wearing the Mi Band until they read Ultan’s post.

Since, they’ve shared pictures of their custom bands.

ultanMi

Ultan’s Hello Kitty Mi Band.

20160226_174826

Christina’s charcoal+red Mi Band.

The Mi Band already comes in a wider array of color options that most fitness bands, and a quick search of Amazon yields many pages of wristband and other non-Xiaomi produced accessories. So, there’s already a market for customizing the $20 device.

And why not, given it’s the price of a nice pedometer with more bells and whistles and a third the cost of the cheapest Fitbit, the Zip, leaving plenty of budget left over for making it yours.

Both Christina and Ultan have been tracking fitness for a long time and as early adopters so I’m ready to declare this a trend, i.e. super-cheap, completely-customizable fitness bands.

Of course, as with anything related to fashion (#fashtech), I’m the last to know. Much like a broken clock, my wardrobe is fashionable every 20 years or so. However, Ultan has been beating the #fashtech drum for a while now, and it seems the time has come to throw off the chains of the dull, black band and embrace color again.

Or something like that. Anyway, find the comments and share your Mi Bands or opinions. Either, both, all good.Possibly Related Posts:

Pages