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OAUX Emerging Technologies in Profit Magazine

Tue, 2015-09-01 16:58

The August 2015 edition of Profit Magazine (@OracleProfit) includes a nice piece called “The Explorers” highlighting the work of our team and that of JD Edwards Labs.


This article is nice companion piece to our strategic approach to emerging technologies and how we apply the “Glance, Scan, Commit” design philosophy to our work.

I’m honored to be quoted in the article and proud to see our little team getting this level of recognition.

If you want to learn more about the R&D projects mentioned, you’re in luck. You can read about the Glance framework and approach and see a quick video of it in action on several smartwatches, including the Apple Watch.

Be sure to read the sidebar, “Moon Shots” which mentions our Muse (@ChooseMuseresearch and our Leap Motion (@LeapMotion) investigations and development projects.

If you want to see some of these emerging technologies projects in person, register to visit the OAUX Cloud Exchange at Oracle OpenWorld 2015, or come tour the new Cloud UX Lab at Oracle HQ.Possibly Related Posts:

Emerging Technologies and the ‘Glance, Scan, Commit’ Design Philosophy

Mon, 2015-08-31 11:41

Cross-posted from VoX.

Behind the Oracle user experience goals of designing for simplicity, mobility, and extensibility is a core design philosophy guiding the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) team’s work in emerging technologies: “Glance, Scan, Commit.”

It nicely boils down a mountain of research and a design experience that shapes the concepts you can see from us.

The philosophy of “Glance, Scan, Commit” permeates all of our work in the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience, especially when investigating emerging technologies.

On your wrist

Some projects fit the “Glance, Scan, Commit” philosophy like a glove. The smaller screens of smartwatches like the Apple Watch and Android Wear watches require the distillation of content to fit.


Consumers demand glance and scan interactions on their wearable devices. The Oracle user experiences provide just the right amount of information on wearable devices and enable the ability to commit to more detail via the accompanying smartphone app.

On your ‘Things’

How else does the OAUX team apply the “Glance, Scan, Commit” design philosophy?

Let’s look at another example: The “Things” in the Internet of Things (IoT) represent a very broad category of Internet-connected devices, and generally speaking, consumers can’t rely on these things to have large screens, or even screens at all. This reduces the experience down to the lightest “glance” of proximity, and in some cases a sonic “glance.”

Sometimes we tap into the user’s context such as micro-location, provided by Bluetooth beacons or Near Field Communications (NFC) tags, to capture a small chunk of information. The “glance” here is the lightest touch of a beacon coming within range or a near field tag brushing up against a sensor.

In some cases, we use the philosophy to build sound “glances,” by capturing chunks of information that are then dictated by a personal assistant, like Amazon Echo. These are simple, small, discrete tasks powered by the human voice and Internet-connected devices.

For the eyes

We are also actively exploring and building visualizations to provide “glance” and “scan” experiences that allow users to consume report data quickly and easily, without poring over tables of information.

Video Storytelling, for example, permits complicated and detailed reports to be animated and delivered via audio and video. Think about the intricacies of a quarterly financial statement; video storytelling does the thinking for you by producing the information in very scannable, organized buckets of audio and video.

The “Glance, Scan, Commit” philosophy becomes even more important when building new experiences. As users are exposed to new experiences, data from the Oracle Applications Cloud provides a constant that helps them embrace these new technologies. Delivering the data in a particular way, using designs shaped by “Glance, Scan, Commit,” increases that consistency.

If the Oracle user experience can provide customers with the information they need to do work every day, in a meaningful way, then new technologies are tools to increase user participation, not barriers.

In the not-so-distant past, “walk up and use” was the bar for experiences, meaning that the interactions should be easy enough to support use without any prior knowledge or training. The user would simply walk up and use it.

The rise of smartphones, ubiquitous connectivity, and IoT — and the emerging technology that enables their use — make our new goal as close to simply “walk up” as possible. Workers can use the system without interacting with it directly, because context collected from phones, combined with smart things around them and enterprise data in the cloud, allow the environment to pass useful information to users without any interactions. This removes more barriers and also works to increase user participation. The more users are engaging with an enterprise system, the more data goes in – and the more value our customers can get out of their investment.

And that, in the end, is the overarching goal of the Oracle user experience.

See it for yourself

If you want to put hands-on what we do, we will be at Oracle OpenWorld participating in the OAUX Cloud Exchange. Attendance requires a non-disclosure agreement, so please register early.Possibly Related Posts:

Amazon Dash — It’s Dinner Time!

Fri, 2015-08-28 17:44

Yesterday I received an Amazon Dash for ordering IZZE juice.


I think it is a great device, not that I would order tons of IZZE from Amazon, but at $5 it has wifi module + a micro controller + a LED light + a battery + nice enclosure, and it’s usually in deep sleep which means the device can last for years. That’s a bargain – a similar device would cost $20 – $40, at least before ESP8266 became available.

First thing I tried is to re-purpose it to toggle on/off the poor man’s Nest screen, because the PiTFT screen is quite bright and gets warm, I want to turn it off without unplugging the cord, and turn it back on instantly if needed. And here is it. Note the IZZE sticker color coordinates well with Nest warm yellow color :)



The signal cycle goes through PubNub, which has MQTT at its core, the response time is less than 0.5 second. So it is remotely controlled – if leave poor man’s Nest in office, I can push the button at home to turn it off.

While my daughter is excited about the IZZE toggle button controlling PiTFT screen, my wife asked me to do something more meaningful :) So I made a second try, turned IZZE button to be a “dinner time” call button.

Every time when dinner is ready, I have to shout toward upstairs to get my kids, and more often than not, I couldn’t get them because they have head-phones on.

So I modified a little bit of the code, to listen for IZZE wake up and try to connect to my router, then use that signal to ask Philips Hue lights to blink 3 times.

Now my wife can just press IZZE button in the kitchen, the Hue lights at my kid’s desk start to blink, and that’s dinner time call.

I guess that is more meaningful, at least I don’t have to shout toward upstairs again :)Possibly Related Posts:

Controlling NodeBox from an Apple Watch

Fri, 2015-08-28 13:39

We are always on the hunt for interesting new uses of the Apple Watch, so when my colleague Ben Bendig alerted me to AstroPad’s new iPhone/Apple Watch app, I downloaded it immediately.

The app, AstroPad Mini, is intended to let you use your iPhone as a graphics tablet and controls Photoshop nicely right out of the box. But it will work with any Mac app; it lets you map any area of your Mac screen to the iPhone and map up to eight keyboard commands to buttons in an Apple Watch app. I reprogrammed it to work with NodeBox.

Although you can zoom and pan the Mac screen from your iPhone, this seems awkward for precision work (the iPad app would work better for that). It was more useful to map a small control area of the screen to the iPhone instead. For Photoshop you could arrange palettes (tools, layers, history) and dialogs (e.g. color picker) into a corner somewhere (maybe on a second monitor), map the iPhone to that, and use the iPhone as an auxiliary screen so you don’t have to keep moving your mouse back and forth. This worked particularly well for the color picker.

iPhone display when controlling a typical NodeBox node

iPhone display when controlling a typical NodeBox node

For NodeBox I mapped the node pane, a small area which displays properties of the currently selected node. I could then select any node on my ginormous screen using a mouse or trackpad and then scrub its properties from the phone (without having to relocate the mouse).

Some of the Apple Watch buttons I use to control NodeBox

Some of the Apple Watch buttons I use to control NodeBox

Even more fun: I mapped common actions to Apple Watch buttons: Save, Full Screen, Escape, New Node, Undo, Redo, Play, and Rewind. When creating animations, it’s pleasant to lean back in my chair, put the display in full screen, and play and rewind to my hearts content all from my watch.

I was also able to focus the iPhone on the slider of my transforming table (running as a web app) and could then stand back from the display and move the slider back and forth from my phone. You could do the same thing by just running the table app on the phone and mirroring it via AirPlay, but AstroPad let me focus the entire iPhone screen on the slider so that it was easier to manipulate.

The app did occasionally lose its wifi connection for a few moments, but otherwise worked fine.

I think with a little thought and practice this setup could speed my workflow somewhat. The benefits are marginal, though, not revolutionary. One tip: if you use the Apple Watch be sure to set “Activate on Wrist Raise” to “Resume Previous Activity” instead of “Show Watch Face” so that you don’t have to keep relaunching the AstoPad app.

We could conceivably use this app in some of the concept demos our group does. It would be a quick and dirty way of controlling some features from an iPhone or Apple Watch without having to write any special code. The catch is that the demo would have to run on a Mac. One advantage: they have an option for controlling the Mac via USB cable instead of wifi, a handy workaround at HQ or demo grounds when sharing a local wifi router is problematic.

Hmmm. I wonder if I could aim and fire my USB Rocket Launcher from my watch. Now THAT might be a killer app.Possibly Related Posts:

Intel Compute Stick: Nowhere and Back Again

Fri, 2015-08-28 08:23

The Intel Compute Stick provides a full desktop experience in an ultra-portable HDMI dongle form factor. It’s like Google Chromecast, but an entire PC instead of just a web browser. I tested both the $150 Windows 8 version and the new $110 Ubuntu version.

The Intel Compute Stick (L) alongside an apple product (R).


The HDMI end goes into a display, the power goes into an outlet, and a blue light comes on but the Stick does not boot. Either tap or long press the power button, then switch the display input source after a few seconds. Just by looking at the Stick you cannot tell if it’s off, on, or booting. Long press the power button and you may end up at the boot menu or the blue light may go off—I suppose making the Stick even more off than previously.


Power on? Try • • • – – – • • •


It boots. This is where you need to find a keyboard, then a little later find a mouse. See, there’s only one USB port on the Stick so we ended up swapping peripherals during the setup. This gets old instantly so either get a USB hub or some bluetooth peripherals. Unsurprisingly, the Microsoft bluetooth keyboard we got from our local StaplesMax Depot did not like the Ubuntu version of the Stick so we needed a hub.

You will want to plug the included HDMI extension cable into the Stick or your wifi will be—at least in my experience—absent. Use the micro-USB charger that came with the Stick if you want it to boot at all. It’s a proprietary charger masquerading as non-proprietary. It’s better to find this out now rather than on the road. All of these non-moving parts make for something…squiddy.


My rig: Squid Exists Between Computer and Chair


I type this now with the intestines. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. It performs well for the tasks that most people perform most often, but then again we live at a time where my $35 MP3 player has a word processor, plays chess, and even runs the game DOOM.


Regularly scheduled popup, even after emptying. I’m sure we can safely ignore it from now on…

Web pages load with a small delay but I have little complaint there. YouTube, for example, runs smoothly and overall the Stick is fine for common tasks.

Lag is lag. While typing I get periodic freezes. No words appear and then all of a sudden abracadabra. Opening a folder in the file manager sometimes takes a few beats. There’s a 64-bit quad-core Atom processor inside® but it sometimes feels like Mac OS 8 or Windows 3.1 on 20 year old hardware. Fun fact: the Ubuntu Stick has 1GB RAM / 8GB storage while the Windows Stick has 2GB RAM / 32GB storage. The internet says you can install Linux on the Windows version.

 seems harmless enough.

Leap Motion: seems harmless enough.

Let’s push things a bit. The Leap Motion is a cool USB device which tracks your hands’ motions and provides an API to do things with that data. Even though the Stick doe—oops, freeze-up—does not meet the minimum requirements, why not give it a try? I’m sure it’s fine and no harm will come of it.

It all had been going so not smoothly too…

It all had been going so not smoothly too…


The Leap Motion did not work so I tried rebooting the Stick. And tried. And tried. And tried… Sure, I had not mastered the power button but this was different. The Stick would show the Ubuntu splash screen and then go endlessly dark. Luckily, others had faced the same issue. I simply had to hold the power button for just less than 4 seconds—not 4 seconds, mind you—to get into the boot menu, then choose to recover the BIOS. BIOS recovery did not fix the black screen. Update the BIOS then. That went smoothly, but did not fix it. There were other trials too.

At this point, I just wanted the beginnings of this very blog post off of the Stick. I decided to make a bootable USB drive so I could at least grab the document. I’ve only made “live” CDs/DVDs before and making a live USB stick was more challenging and time-consuming than I had anticipated. I was able to get GParted installed but then decided Puppy Linux with persistency would be easier. I tried doing this on my Linux machine at home but in the end the easiest thing I found was LinuxLive USB Creator on Windows. Prepared, I hoped that the next day I would be able to grab those words up there from the borked Stick.

When I got to work I decided to try the Stick again: same problem, of course. I had a meeting so I left it plugged in. When I got back I tried rebooting, ever the naïve optimist.

It boots!!! And an error message popped up, perhaps the cause of all of this: The volume “Filesystem root” has only 156.5 MB disk space remaining. Where had I seen that before?

My confidence restored along with the bootability, I am continuing this blog post on the Stick. It is behaving well with little lag although Firefox crashed a couple times with one tab open. I’m not entirely sure if this is “normal” or if the trials and tribulations took their toll.

Firefox the gray

Firefox the gray

If the self-healing mini-miracle had not happened, would I have been able to boot from the USB stick? No. There’s a Catch-22 because of the sole USB port. The keyboard needs that port to use the boot menu. Using the hub or switching to the hub when at that menu ends all input from then on. There is a micro SD slot, and if I wasn’t exhausted from all of this I would try to boot from it.

The EndPossibly Related Posts:

Summer Projects and a Celebration

Thu, 2015-08-27 09:02

If you follow us on Twitter (@theappslab) or on Facebook, you’ve seen some of the Summer projects coming together.

If not, here’s a recap of some of the tinkering going on in OAUX Emerging Technologies land.

Mark (@mvilrokx) caught the IoT bug from Noel (@noelportugal), and he’s been busy destroying and rebuilding a Nerf gun, which is a thing. Search for “nerf gun mods” if you don’t believe me.


Mark installed our favorite chip, the ESP8266, to connect the gun to the internets, and he’s been tinkering from there.

Meanwhile, Raymond (@yuhuaxie) has been busy building a smart thermostat.



And finally, completely unrelated to IoT tinkering, earlier this month the Oracle Mexico Development Center (MDC) in Guadalajara celebrated its fifth anniversary. As you know, we have two dudes in that office, Os (@vaini11a) and Luis (@lsgaleana), as well as an extended OAUX family. Congratulations.



11218984_950231691687103_4011713548176238985_nPossibly Related Posts:

New Adventures with Raspberry Pi

Tue, 2015-08-18 13:02

If you read here, you’ll recall that Noel (@noelportugal) and I have been supporters of the Raspberry Pi for a long time, Noel on the build side, many, many times, me on the talking-about-how-cool-and-useful-it-is side.

And we’ve been spreading the love through internal hackdays and lots of projects.

So, yeah, we love us some Raspi.

The little guy has become our go-to choice to power all our Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

Since its launch in early 2012, the little board that could has come a long way. The latest model, the Raspberry Pi 2 B, can even run a stripped down Windows 10 build to do IoT stuff.

Given all that we do with Raspis, I’ve always meant to get one for my own tinkering. However, Noel scared me off long ago with stories about how long it took to get one functional and the risks.

For example, I remember reading a long post early on the Pi’s history about how choosing a Micro USB was critical, amperage too high burned out the board, too low and it wouldn’t run.

The information was out there, contributed by a huge and generous community. I just never had the time to invest.

Recently, I’ve been talking the good people at the Oracle Education Foundation (@ORCLcitizenship) about ways our team can continue to help them with their workshops, and one of their focus areas is the Raspberry Pi.

After all, the mission of the Raspi creators was to teach kids about computers, so yeah.

I figured it was finally time to overcome my fears and get dirty, and thanks to Noel, I found a kit that included everything I would need, this Starter Kit from Vilros.


Vilros Raspberry Pi 2 Complete Starter Kit

Armed with this kit, I took a day and hoped that would be enough to get the little guy running. About an hour after starting, I was done.

IMG_20150812_095354 IMG_20150812_103311 IMG_20150812_103512 IMG_20150812_111034

Going from zero to functional is now ridiculously easy, thanks to these kits that include all the necessities.

So, now I have a functioning Pi running Raspbian. All I need is a project, any ideas?

Coda: Happy coincidence, as I wrote this post, I got a DM from Kellyn Pot’Vin-Gorman (@dbakevlar) asking if knew any ways for her to use her Raspberry Pi skills in an educational capacity. Yay kismet.
Possibly Related Posts:

Get a Look at the Future Oracle Cloud User Experience at Oracle OpenWorld 2015

Tue, 2015-08-18 12:19

Here’s the first of many OpenWorld-related posts, this one cross-posted from our colleagues and friends at VoX, the Voice of Experience for Oracle Cloud Applications. Enjoy.

Are you all set for Oracle OpenWorld 2015 (@oracleopenworld)? Even if you think you’re already booked for the event, you’ll want to squeeze in a chance to experience the future of the Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) — and maybe even make a few UX buddies along the way — with these sessions, demos, and speakers. We loved OOW 2014, and couldn’t wait to get ready for this year.


Lucas Jellema, AMIS & Oracle ACE Director (left), Anthony Lai, Oracle (center), Jake Kuramoto, Oracle (right) at OOW 2015 during our strategy day. Photo by Rob Hernandez.

Save the Date: Oracle Applications Cloud User Experience Strategy & Roadmap Day

The OAUX team is hosting a one-day interactive seminar ahead of Oracle OpenWorld 2015 to get select partners and customers ready for the main event. This session will focus on Oracle’s forward-looking investment in the Oracle Applications Cloud user experience.

You’ll get the opportunity to share feedback about the Oracle Applications Cloud UX in the real world. How is our vision lining up with what needs to happen in your market?

Speaking of our vision, we’ll start the session with the big-picture perspective on trends and emerging technologies we are watching and describe their anticipated effect on your end-user experiences. Attendees will take a deeper dive into specific focus areas of the Oracle Applications Cloud and learn about our impending investments in the user experience including HCM Cloud, CX Cloud, and ERP Cloud.

The team will also share with you the plans for Cloud user experience tools, including extensibility and user experience in the Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS4SaaS) world (get the latest here). We’ll close out the day with a “this-town-ain’t-big-enough” event that was extremely popular last year: the ACE Director Speaker Showdown.

Want to go?

When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015
Where: Oracle Conference Center, Room 202, 350 Oracle Pkwy, Redwood City, CA 94065
Who: Applications Cloud partners and customers (especially HCM, CX, or ERP Cloud), Oracle ACE Directors, and Oracle-internal Cloud thought leaders in product development, sales, or Worldwide Alliances and Channels

Register Now!

To get on our waitlist.

Active confidential disclosure agreement required.

Chloe Arnold and Mindi Cummins, Oracle, during OOW 2014 at the OAUX Cloud Exchange

Chloe Arnold and Mindi Cummins, Oracle, during OOW 2014 at the OAUX Cloud Exchange.

Save the Date: Oracle Applications User Experience Cloud Exchange

Speakers and discussions are all well and good, but what is the future of the Oracle Applications UX really like? The OAUX team is providing a daylong, demo-intensive networking event at Oracle OpenWorld 2015 to show you what the results of Oracle’s UX strategy will look like.

User experience is a key differentiator for the Oracle Applications Cloud, and Oracle is investing heavily in its future. Come see what our recently released and near-release user experiences look like, and check out our research and development user experience concepts, then let us know what you think.

These experience experiments for the modern user will delve even deeper into the OAUX team’s guiding principles of simplicity, mobility, and extensibility and come from many different product areas. This is cutting-edge stuff, folks. And, since we know you’re worn out from these long, interactive days, this event will also feature refreshments.

Want to go?

When: Monday, October 26, 2015
Where: InterContinental Hotel, San Francisco
Who: Oracle Applications Cloud Partners, Customers, Oracle ACEs and ACE Directors, Analysts, Oracle-internal Cloud thought leaders in product development, sales, or Worldwide Alliances and Channels.

Register Now!

To get on our waitlist.

Active confidential disclosure agreement required.Possibly Related Posts:

IFTTT Maker Channel

Mon, 2015-08-17 20:29


A couple months a go IFTTT added a much needed feature: A custom channel for generic urls. They called it the Maker Channel. If you noticed my previous post, I used it to power an IoT Staples Easy Button.

At a closer look this is a very powerful feature. Now you can basically make and receive web requests (webhooks) from any possible connected device to any accessible web service (API, public server, etc..) It is important to highlight that requests “may” be rate limited, so don’t start going crazy with Big Data style pushing.


You can also trigger any of the existing Channels with the Maker Channel.  So either you can choose to trigger any of the existing Channels when you POST/GET to the Maker Channel:


if-maker-then-hue if-maker-then-lifx if-maker-then-gdrive

Or you could have IFTTT POST/GET/PUT to your server when any of the existing Channels are triggered.

There seems to be hundred of possible combinations or “recipes.”

Do you use IFTTT? Do you find it useful? Let me know in the comments.Possibly Related Posts:

IFTTT Easy Button

Sat, 2015-08-15 10:00


The Amazon Dash button, it’s all the buzz lately. Regardless whether you think it is the greatest invention or just a passing fad, it is a nice little IoT device. There is already work underway to try and make it work with custom code.

There are a couple crowdfunding projects (flic and btn) that are attempting to create custom IoT buttons as well. But these often come with a high price tag (around $100).

This is where the up and coming ESP8266 mcu can shine. For under $3 you can have a wifi chip plus a programable micro-controller. You just need to add a cheap button (like the Staples Easy Button for around $7.) Add good ol’ IFTTT Maker Channel and you will be set to go with your custom IoT button for about $10.


Check my project ( to learn how to make your own.

Possibly Related Posts:

What Kids Tell Us about Touch and Voice

Fri, 2015-08-14 12:28

Recently, my four year-old daughter and her little bestie were fiddling with someone’s iPhone. I’m not sure which parent had sacrificed the device for our collective sanity.

Anyway, they were talking to Siri. Her bestie was putting Siri through its paces, and my daughter asked for a joke, because that’s her main question for Alexa, a.k.a. the Amazon Echo.


Siri failed at that, and my daughter remarked something like “Our Siri knows the weather too.”

Thus began an interesting comparison of what Siri and “our Siri” i.e. the Echo can do, a pretty typical four year-old topping contest. You know, mine’s better, no mine is, and so forth.

After resolving that argument, I thought about how natural it was for them to talk to devices, something that I’ve never really liked to do, although I do find talking to Alexa more natural than talking to Google Now or Siri.

I’m reminded of a post, which I cannot find, Paul (@ppedrazzi) wrote many years ago about how easily a young child, possibly one of his daughters, picked up and used an iPhone. This was in 2008 or 2009, early days for the iPhone, and the child was probably two, maybe three, years old. Wish I could find that post.

From what I recall, Paul mused on how natural touch was as an input mechanism for humans, as displayed by how a child could easily pick up and use an iPhone. I’ve seen the same with my daughter, who has been using iOS on one device or another since she was much younger.

I’m observing that speech as equally natural to her.

Kids provide great anecdotal research for me because they’re not biased by what they already know about technology.

When I use something like gesture or voice control, I can’t help but compare it to what I know already, i.e. keyboard, mouse, which colors my impressions.

Watching kids use touch and voice input, the interactions seem very natural.

This is obvious stuff that’s been known forever, but it took how long for someone, Apple, to get touch right? Voice is in an earlier phase, advancing, but not completely natural.

One point Noel (@noelportugal) makes about about voice input is that having a wake word is awkward, i.e. “Alexa” or “OK Google,” but given privacy concerns, this is the best solution for the moment. Noel wants to customize that wake word, but that’s only incrementally better.

When commanding the Amazon Echo, it’s not very natural to say “Alexa” and pause to ensure she’s listening. My daughter tends to blurt out a full sentence without the pause, “Alexa tell us a joke” which sometimes works.

That pause creates awkward usability, at least I think it does.

Since its release, Noel has led the charge for Amazon Echo research, testing and hacking (lots of hacking) on our team, and we’ve got some pretty cool projects brewing to test our theories. I’ve been using it around my home for a while, and I’m liking it a lot, especially the regular updates Amazon pushes to enhance it, e.g. IFTTT integration, smart home controlGoogle Calendar integration, reordering items from Amazon and a lot more.

Amazon is expanding its voice investment too, providing Alexa as a service, VaaS or AVS as they call it.

I fully believe the not-so-distant future will feature touch and speech, and maybe gestures, at the glance and scan layers of interaction, with the old school keyboard and mouse for heavy duty commit interactions.

Quick review, glance, scan, commit is our strategic design philosophy. Check out Ultan (@ultan) explaining it if you need a refresher.

So, what do you think? Thank you Captain Obvious, or pump the brakes Jake?

Find the comments.Possibly Related Posts:

Biohacking, Here Come the Cyborgs

Tue, 2015-08-11 11:21

For me, 2015 has been the year of the quantified self.

I’ve been tracking my activity using various wearables: Nike+ Fuelband, Basis Peak, Jawbone UP24, Fitbit Surge, and currently, Garmin Vivosmart. I just set up Automatic to track my driving; check out Ben’s review for details. I couldn’t attend QS15, but luckily, Thao (@thaobnguyen) and Ben went and provided a complete download.

And, naturally, I’m fascinated by biohacking because, at its core, it’s the same idea, i.e. how to improve/modify the body to do more, better, faster.


Professor Kevin Warwick of the University of Reading

Ever since I read about RFID chip implanting in the early 00s, I’ve been curiously observing from the fringe. This post on the Verge today included a short video about biohacking that was well worth 13 and half minutes.

If you like that, check out the long-form piece, Cyborg America: inside the strange new world of basement body hackers.

This stuff is fascinating to me. People like Kevin Warwick and Steve Mann have modified themselves for the better, but I’m guessing the future of biohacking lies in healthcare and military applications, places where there’s big money to be made.

My job is to look ahead, and I love doing that. At some point during this year, Tony asked me what the future held; what were my thoughts on the next big things in technology.

I think the human body is the next frontier for technology. It’s an electrical source that could solve the modern battery woes we all have; it’s an enormous source for data collection, and you can’t forget it in a cab or on a plane. At some point, because we’ll be so dependent on it, technology will become parasitic.

And I for one, welcome the cyborg overlords.

Find the comments.Possibly Related Posts:

Jeremy and Noel Talk IoT at Kscope15

Mon, 2015-08-10 10:42

By now, you know all about the Scavenger Hunt we ran a Kscope15 in partnership with our good friends at ODTUG and YCC.

Noel (@noelportugal) talked about the technical bits in a post last week, and today, ODTUG posted an interview featuring our fearless leader, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), and Noel from the conference wherein they talk about Internet of Things (IoT) and the IoT bits included in the Hunt.

If you read here, you’ll know that IoT has been a long-time passion of Noel’s, dating back to well before Internet-connected devices were commonplace and way before they had an acronym.

Thanks to ODUTG for giving us the opportunity to do something cool and fun using our nerdy passion, IoT.Possibly Related Posts:

Guerrilla Testing at OHUG

Mon, 2015-08-10 02:52

The Apple Watch came out, and we had a lot of questions: What do people want to do on it? What do they expect to be able to do on it? What are they worried about? And more importantly, what are they excited about?

But we had a problem—we wanted to ask a lot of people about the Apple Watch, but nobody had it, so how could we do any research?

Our solution was to do some guerrilla testing at the OHUG conference in June, which took place in Las Vegas. We had a few Apple Watches at that time, so we figured we could let people play around with the watch, and then ask them some targeted questions. This was the first time running a study like this, so we weren’t sure how hard it would be to get people to participate by just asking them while they were at the conference.

It turned out the answer was “not very.” We should have known—people both excited and skeptical were curious about what the watch was really like.


Friend of the ‘Lab and Oracle ACE Director Gustavo Gonzalez and Ben enjoy some Apple humor.

Eventually we had to tell the people at our recruiting desk to stop asking people if they want to participate! Some sessions went on for over 45 minutes, with conference attendees chatting about different possibilities and concerns, brainstorming use cases that would work for them or their customers.


The activity was a great success, generating some valuable insights not only about how people would like to use a smartwatch (Apple or not), but how they want notifications to work in general. Which, of course, is an important part of how people get their work done using Oracle applications.


Our method was pretty simple: We had them answer some quick survey questions, then we put the watch on them and let them explore and ask questions. While they were exploring, we sent them some mock notifications to see what they thought, and then finished up asking them more in depth about what they want to be able to accomplish with the watch.

At the end, they checked off items from a list of notifications that they’d like to receive on the watch. We recorded everything so we didn’t have to have someone taking notes during the interviews. It took some time to transcribe everything, but it was extremely valuable to have actual quotes bringing to life the users’ needs and concerns with notifications and how they want things to work on a smartwatch.

Most usability activities we run at conferences involve 5–10 people, whether it’s a usability test or a focus group, and usually they all have similar roles. It was valuable here to get a cross-section of people from different roles and levels of experience, talking about their needs for not only a new technology, but also some core functionality of their systems.

In retrospect, we were a little lucky. It would probably be a lot more difficult to talk to the same number of people for an appreciable amount of time just about notifications, and though we did learn a good deal about wants and needs for developing for the watch, it was also a lot broader than that.

So one takeaway is to find a way to take advantage of something people will be excited to try out—not just in learning about that specific new technology, but other areas that technology can impact.Possibly Related Posts:

Game Mechanics of a Scavenger Hunt

Fri, 2015-08-07 13:17

android512x512This year we organized a scavenger hunt for Kscope15 in collaboration with the ODTUG board and YCC.

As we found out, scavenger hunts are a great way to get people to see your content, create buzz and have fun along the way.  We also used the scavenger hunt as a platform to try some of the latest technologies. The purpose was to have conference attendees complete tasks using Internet of Things (IoT), Twitter hashtags and pictures and compete for a prize.

Here is a short technical overview of the technologies we used.


We opted to use a Node.js back-end and a React front-end to do a clever Twitter name autocomplete. As you typed your Twitter handle, the first and last name fields were completed for you. Once you filled all your information the form submitted to a REST endpoint based on Oracle APEX. This piece was built by Mark Vilrokx (@mvilrokx) and we were all very happy with the results.


Smart Badge

We researched two possible technologies: Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Beacons and Near Field Communication (NFC) stickers and settled for NFC. The reason behind choosing NFC was the natural tendency we have to touch something (NFC scanner) and get something in return (notifications + points). When we tested with BLE beacons the “check-in” experience was more transparent but not as obvious when trying to complete a task.

We added a NFC sticker to all scavenger hunt participants’ badges so they could get points by scanning their badge in our Smart Scanners.  To provision each NFC badge we build an Android app that took the tag id and associated with the user profile.


Smart Scanner

The Smart Scanner was a great way to showcase IoT. We used the beloved Raspberry Pis to host an NFC reader. We used the awesome blink(1) USB LED light to indicate whether the scan was successful or not. We also added a Mini USB Wi-Fi dongle and a high capacity battery to assure complete freedom from wires.

Raymond Xie (@YuhuaXie) did a great job using Java 8 to read the NFC stickers and send the information to our REST server. The key part for these scanners was creating a failover system in case of internet disconnection. In such case we would still read the NFC tag and register it, then it would post it to our server as soon as connectivity was restored.


Twitter and SMS Bots

Another key component was to create a twitter and SMS bot. Once again, Mark used Node.js to consume the Twitter stream. We looked for tweets mentioning #kscope15 and #taskhashtag. Then we posted to our REST server which made sure that points were given to the right person for the right task. Again we were pleasantly surprised by the flexibility and power of Node.js. Similarly we deployed a Twilio SMS server that listened for SMS subscriptions and sent SMS notifications.


We just didn’t settled by creating a web client to keep track of points. We created a web mobile client (React), an iOS app and an Android app. This was part of our research to see how people used each platform. As a bonus we created Apple Watch and Android Wear companion apps. One of the challenges we had was to create a similar experience across platforms.



We needed a way to manage all task and player administration. Since we used APEX  and PLSQL to create our REST interface, it was a no brainer to use APEX for our admin front-end. The added bonus was that APEX has user authentication and sessions management, so all we had to do is create admin users with different roles.

Screen Shot 2015-08-07 at 1.54.25 PM


Creating a scavenger hunt for tech conference is no easy task. You have to take into consideration many factors, from what are the right task for the conference attendees to having the optimal wifi connection. Having an easy registration and provisioning process are also paramount for easy uptake.

We really had fun using the latest technologies and we feel we successfully showcased what good UX can do for you across different devices and platforms. Stay tuned to see if we end up doing another similar activity. You wont want to miss it!Possibly Related Posts:

Royal High School Students Visit Oracle

Thu, 2015-08-06 20:29

Last week a group of high school students from Royal High School visited Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores, California.

Royal High School, a public school in Simi Valley, California, is launching an International Business Pathway program. This program is part of California’s Career Pathways Trust (CCPT), which was established in 2013 by the California State Legislature to better prepare students for the 21st Century workplace.

The goal of the visit was to introduce students to real life examples of what they will be studying in the year ahead, which include Business Organization and Environment, Marketing, Human Resources, Operations, and Finance.

I was honored to be invited to be on a career panel with three other Oracle colleagues and share our different careers and career paths.

L-R Chris Kite, VP Finance A&C/NSG; Jessica Moore, Sr Director Corporate Communications; Thao Nguyen, Director Research & Design; Kym Flaigg, College Recruiting Manager

While Oracle is known as a technology company, it is comprised of many different functional areas beyond engineering. The panel shared our diverse backgrounds and education, our different roles within the organization, the different cultures within Oracle, and more.

Since these are students in an international business program, we also discussed Oracle as a global business. The panelists shared our individual involvement and impact on Oracle’s international business – from working with Oracle colleagues located throughout the world to engaging with global customers, partners, and journalists.

By the end, the students heard stories of our professional and personal journeys to where we are now. The common themes were to be authentic and true to yourself, change is inevitable, and it is a lifetime of learning. All of the panelists started on one path but ultimately found new interests and directions.

The students learned there are many different opportunities in companies and many different paths to achieve career and life goals. Bring your passion to work and you’ll succeed.

On a personal note, I grew up in the same area as these students, that being the San Fernando Valley in Southern California. I moved from the San Fernando Valley to the Silicon Valley years ago, but thanks to Oracle Giving, I am able to give back to my roots and proud to participant in Oracle’s community outreach .Possibly Related Posts: