Moans Nogood

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Updated: 5 hours 31 min ago

Google - just another big, dumb, brutal organisation?

Mon, 2007-12-31 04:42
I found this article in The Economist interesting:

http://economist.com/business/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10328123

There's some truth there, I think. Google is buying stuff (like blogger), is making pirate copies (sorry: clones) of other companies' software and in general trying to be as dominant and brutal as Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and the others. Yawn.

What the Hell happened to "Don't do evil"? Why did Google sell out to the Chinese horror regime?

They're just after the money and the happiness of shareholdes. Boring stuff.

Mogens

Mobile phones, fats and backups

Thu, 2007-12-27 04:56
As with such things, life has been rather dull since the fire - relatively speaking. Fortunately, I had a wonderful thing happening to my mobile phone that brightened several of my days before Christmas.

It all started about half a year ago, when the menu button on my Nokia E60 stopped working. That's rather inconvenient, but I could still call people up and receive calls, so no big problem.

Then, one Saturday in December, the old team from the National Nurses' Dormitory in Copenhagen had our annual, traditional, Danish Christmas lunch in a place called Told & Snaps in Copenhagen. When the frist dish was brought in - pickled herrings, of course - my dear friend Ole and I decided to see if soft butter on the keys could bring the menu button back to life. So we, uhm, buttered the keyboard - and it worked! The menu button worked again!

Flushed with succes we decided to try and repair the problems I had with the microphone and loudspeaker in the E60. So we used fat (from a duck, I think) on the, eh, bottom of the phone. Didn't seem to have the desired effect. In fact, in the days that followed I had to shout louder and louder in order for people to hear me. It was getting silly - I had to be in the privacy of my car in order not to disturb the general population with my shouting.

But I could still send and receive SMS messages, so things were OK.

Then my wife Anette and I had dinner at restaurant Avanti and that's when Anette hit the oil lamp on the table so that the E60 became soaked in oil. The display looked like a lava lamp and the keys became very loooong and soooft to use.

During the night, while I was asleep, the E60 sadly expired.

That's when I discovered that my 800 contacts were residing inside the E60, not on the mini-SD-card. So I got a new phone from a friendly phone broker (an N-73, which seems to be a fine phone, by the way) but every call I received were wonderfully new and exciting since I didn't recognice any of the numbers.

Of course I didn't have any backup. I'm a man.

Then a miracle happened. Anette and some good Miracle folks managed to wake up the phone for a short while and unload my contacts. That was a good day.

So people have told me: This will teach you to remember to take a backup!

But look at it this way: I started carrying a mobile phone 25/8/370 back in 1991 and this was the first time I was in danger of losing everything. And I have never taken a backup.

Chances are it won't happen again anytime soon either, unless somebody steals it.

So I think I'll continue with my usual mobile phone backup strategy :-))).

Merry Christmas.

Mogens

The Fire, part II

Sun, 2007-12-09 18:20
Turns out there are many more good things to be said about this incident:

a. The entire house will be cleaned for Christmas.
b. All windows will be cleaned.
c. The entire first floor will be re-painted.
d. We'll get a complete list of our posessions.
e. Since the entire first floor has been emtied, we can now do all the things we always dreamed of doing up there.
f. My hand-made Italian shoes will be replaced, which is good, since little Viktor removed one of my shoe laces some months ago, and we haven't been able to locate it since.
g. We now live (with the consent of my wife Anette) on top of a bar, and the owner - Jytte - is one of the most heart-warming people I've ever met. Her magnificient helper Linda immediately moved out of her apartment so that we could stay there - just to mention one detail out of many.
h. Christmas will be special this year, no matter what happens. Just like in the movies, where the Christmas peace is secured in the last minute.

I cannot even begin to see the downsides of this unfortunate incident :-))).

Mogens

Boring life.

Thu, 2007-11-29 16:57
As my 18-year old daughter Christine said yesterday when she arrived at the scene: "There's ALWAYS something going on in this house."

Here's what happened:

We have insufficient pressure on the cold water in our house these days. It means that something must be done, so CarpenterTorben called on Grethe's brother, who can fix water things.

It required that we broke up a bit of the floor in our entre/foyer/whatever it's called in our house and dig a big hole on the outside in order to get to the water pipes. Torben and I joked about an idea: Why not tear down the whole house and build a new one where there's plenty of space for pipes, wires, and such?

Well, one should be careful about what one wishes for.

Grethe's brother arrived around 1400 hours yesterday and within minutes I had complaints from my wife via text messages and phone calls that he was leaving dust everywhere, and how on Earth were we supposed to get it cleaned in time for the weekend?

So when Anette called the third time I was tempted not to answer, but I did.

This time she wasn't worried about the dust. She was in our bedroom upstairs with Viktor and Melina (2 and 9 years old) and the staircase was blocked due to fire and thick smoke downstairs.

Grethe's brother had been cutting a water pipe when a spark ignited the styrofoam used for insulation under the floor. Since he had cut the water supply he acted quickly and took a towel, dipped in the toilet, and tried to put out the fire that way. Didn't work. It kept creeping further and further under the floor through the styrofoam.

So he called for fire figthers while Anette shut doors upstairs and opened the windows in the bedroom where she was, ready to throw the kids out of the window into either blankets or arms of the people gathered under the window. She even had the wherewithal to look for tape that could seal the door from the smoke. She then called me, CarpenterTorben and others. Then she made sure the kids were dressed warmly. Cool lady under pressure!

Turns out I can drive 180 km/h on a bike path and cross lots of red lights if I have to (due to the rush hour traffic blocking the roads). I found out later that Torben had done the same in an attempt to get quickly from our new office to Kratvej.

When I arrived there were already seven fire trucks, ambulances and police cars on site. Anette and the kids had been saved out of the window by a big, strong fire fighter, and the fire had pretty much been put out.

Anette, Viktor and Melina were taken to ER, had oxygene and came home again in a taxi, still with no shoes. All shoes are kind of rubbish. They slept in NabooPeter's house, Christine slept in the Garage and I slept (of course!) on the couch in the living room, just in case somebody wanted to sneak in and steal my laptop or other important things.

So nobody got hurt, and we didn't lose any dear possessions (bar all our shoes), which is very nice.

Oh, the Emergency Service company that took over when the fire fighters left wouldn't listen to CarpenterTorben, who kept saying that it was still burning somewhere underneath the floor. But suddenly they were convinced, too, and the fire fighters had to show up a second time. This time Torben had to break down the floor in the entre/foyer with a huge drill hammer (or whatever it's called) so they could get down to the styrofoam. Otherwise, the fire would have spread underneath the floors to the kitchen and living room (and possibly to the oak table!). Good man, this Torben. I think he saved my house yesterday.

We can't live in the house for some days - it has to be cleaned due to the smoke, particles and such. But Jytte, who runs the local restaurant, has made an apartment upstairs ready for us, and all the neightbours are ready to house us, too.

So we wished for a lot of cold water with high pressure. We got that, courtesy of the Ballerup fire brigade.

We also wished for easy access to the water pipes. We got that.

Anette wanted new shoes. Check.

I never liked the white colour of the entre/foyer walls. Man, it's black now.

Viktor always loved fire trucks. Check.

Women dream about being rescued out of a burning building through the window by a big, strong fire fighter. Check.

Tomorrow we'll have the traditional, Danish Christmas lunch in Miracle. We have things to talk about now.

Mogens

PS: And I forgot to mention that it was CarpenterTorben's birthday that day!

Things I learned at Oracle Open World in SFO 2008

Tue, 2007-11-20 15:53
I just came back from a few days at OOW, and it was fun. I shared a biggish apartment with Anjo Kolk, Krister (Sweden) and Oliver (Danish CSC), and it was beautiful to see the beer bottles (good beers, mind you!) gradually filling up the kitchen table allocated for that purpose.

On Sunday, November 11, I was invited to a seven-hour briefing for Oracle ACE Directors (I am such a thing). It was mostly about the Fusion Middle Ware (MW) and in the end a bit about the 11g database.

I have three observations:

1. During the MW presentations I saw more acronyms than in my entire military career.

2. 'Oracle' was the only word with less than seven letters in all those slides.

3. The best thing that can happen to any product is to be bought by Oracle. Turns out, that the purchase itself will transfer the product overnight from being worth-, use- and hopeless to being an absolutely state-of-the-art, best-of-beer product.

Interesting to learn that MW is database agnostic and Apps server agnostic. This obviously generates some interesting discussions inside Oracle.

And, man, do things change in the MW: Forget SOA, here comes SCA. Forget hub-and-spoke - it's just SO yesterday. Forget Portal - here comes WebCenter.

I am tempted to quote the standup comedian Billy Connolly, who said some years ago: "... and it will all change tomorrow, so f.... stay awake!"

Apart from that, it was a good day with knowledgeable presenters, and I learned a lot. Thanks to the Oracle ACE ladies (Emily & Victoria) for setting this up.

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday I simply set up a virtual office at the tex-mex restaurant Chevy's and met a bunch of friends from inside and outside Oracle during those days. It was good, and it generated a lot of good ideas.

There were 1600 presentations in total. 100 of these were database-related. Interesting.

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