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Two Amazing Men Discovered Evolution by Natural Selection!

FeuerThoughts - Thu, 2016-04-07 09:09
Most everyone knows about Darwin, and what they think they know is that Charles Darwin is the discoverer of Evolution through Natural Selection. And for sure, he did discover this. But the amazing thing is....he wasn't the only one. And whereas Darwin came to this theory pretty much as a Big Data Scientist over a long period of time (mostly via "armchair" collection of data from scientists and naturalists around the world), The Other Guy developed his theory of Natural Selection very much in the field - more specifically, in the jungle, surrounded by the living evidence. 

His name is Alfred Russel Wallace, he is one of my heroes, and I offer below the "real story" for your reading pleasure. 

One of the things I really love about this story is the way Darwin and Wallace respected each other, and did right by each other. We all have a lot to learn from their integrity and compassion.

Alfred Russel Wallace and Natural Selection: the Real Story 
By Dr George Beccaloni, Director of the Wallace Correspondence Project, March 2013

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/tv/junglehero/alfred-wallace-biography.pdf

Alfred Russel Wallace OM, LLD, DCL, FRS, FLS was born near Usk, Monmouthshire, England (now part of Wales) on January 8th, 1823. Serious family financial problems forced him to leave school aged only fourteen and a few months later he took a job as a trainee land surveyor with his elder brother William. This work involved extensive trekking through the English and Welsh countryside and it was then that his interest in natural history developed.

Whilst living in Neath, Wales, in 1845 Wallace read Robert Chambers' extremely popular and anonymously published book Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation and became fascinated by the controversial idea that living things had evolved from earlier forms. So interested in the subject did he become that he suggested to his close friend Henry Walter Bates that they travel to the Amazon to collect and study animals and plants, with the goal of understanding how evolutionary change takes place. They left for Brazil in April 1848, but although Wallace made many important discoveries during his four years in the Amazon Basin, he did not manage to solve the great ‘mystery of mysteries’ of how evolution works.

Wallace returned to England in October 1852, after surviving a disastrous shipwreck which destroyed all the thousands of natural history specimens he had painstakingly collected during the last two and most interesting years of his trip. Undaunted, in 1854 he set off on another expedition, this time to the Malay Archipelago (Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia), where he would spend eight years travelling, collecting, writing, and thinking about evolution. He visited every important island in the archipelago and sent back 110,000 insects, 7,500 shells, 8,050 bird skins, and 410 mammal and reptile specimens, including probably more than five thousand species new to science.

In Sarawak, Borneo, in February 1855, Wallace produced one of the most important papers written about evolution up until that time1. In it he proposed a ‘law’ which stated that "Every species has come into existence coincident both in time and space with a pre-existing closely allied species". He described the affinities (relationships) between species as being “...as intricate as the twigs of a gnarled oak or the vascular system of the human body” with “...the stem and main branches being represented by extinct species...” and the “...vast mass of limbs and boughs and minute twigs and scattered leaves...” living species. The eminent geologist and creationist Charles Lyell was so struck by Wallace’s paper that in November 1855, soon after reading it, he began a ‘species notebook’ in which he started to contemplate the possibility of evolution for the first time.

In April 1856 Lyell visited Charles Darwin at Down House in Kent, and Darwin confided that for the past twenty years he had been secretly working on a theory (natural selection) which neatly explained how evolutionary change takes place. Not long afterwards, Lyell sent Darwin a letter urging him to publish before someone beat him to it (he probably had Wallace in mind), so in May 1856, Darwin, heeding this advice, began to write a ‘sketch’ of his ideas for publication.
Finding this unsatisfactory, Darwin abandoned it in about October 1856 and instead began working on an extensive book on the subject.

The idea of natural selection came to Wallace during an attack of fever whilst he was on a remote Indonesian island in February 1858 (it is unclear whether this epiphany happened on Ternate or neighbouring Gilolo (Halmahera)). As soon as he had sufficient strength, he wrote a detailed essay explaining his theory and sent it together with a covering letter to Darwin, who he knew from earlier correspondence, was deeply interested in the subject of species transmutation (as evolution was then called).

Wallace asked Darwin to pass the essay on to Lyell (who Wallace did not know), if Darwin thought it sufficiently novel and interesting. Darwin had mentioned in an earlier letter to Wallace that Lyell had found his 1855 paper noteworthy and Wallace must have thought that Lyell would be interested to learn about his new theory, since it neatly explained the ‘law’ which Wallace had proposed in that paper.

Darwin, having formulated natural selection years earlier, was horrified when he received Wallace’s essay and immediately wrote an anguished letter to Lyell asking for advice on what he should do. "I never saw a more striking coincidence. If Wallace had my M.S. sketch written out in 1842 he could not have made a better short abstract! ... So all my originality, whatever it may amount to, will be smashed." he exclaimed2. Lyell teamed up with another of Darwin's close friends, Joseph Hooker, and rather than attempting to seek Wallace's permission, they decided instead to present his essay plus two excerpts from Darwin’s writings on the subject (which had never been intended for publication3) to a meeting of the Linnean Society of London on July 1st 1858. The public presentation of Wallace's essay took place a mere 14 days after its arrival in England.

Darwin and Wallace's musings on natural selection were published in the Society’s journal in August that year under the title “On the Tendency of Species to Form Varieties; And On the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection”. Darwin's contributions were placed before Wallace's essay, thus emphasising his priority to the idea4. Hooker had sent Darwin the proofs to correct and had told him to make any alterations he wanted5, and although he made a large number of changes to the text he had written, he chose not to alter Lyell and Hooker’s arrangement of his and Wallace’s contributions.

Lyell and Hooker stated in their introduction to the Darwin-Wallace paper that “...both authors...[have]...unreservedly placed their papers in our hands...”, but this is patently untrue since Wallace had said nothing about publication in the covering letter he had sent to Darwin6. Wallace later grumbled that his essay “...was printed without my knowledge, and of course without any correction of proofs...”7

As a result of this ethically questionable episode8, Darwin stopped work on his big book on evolution and instead rushed to produce an ‘abstract’ of what he had written so far. This was published fifteen months later in November 1859 as On the Origin of Species: a book which Wallace later magnanimously remarked would “...live as long as the "Principia" of Newton.”9

In spite of the theory’s traumatic birth, Darwin and Wallace developed a genuine admiration and respect for one another. Wallace frequently stressed that Darwin had a stronger claim to the idea of natural selection, and he even named one of his most important books on the subject Darwinism! Wallace spent the rest of his long life explaining, developing and defending natural selection, as well as working on a very wide variety of other (sometimes controversial) subjects. He wrote more than 1000 articles and 22 books, including The Malay Archipelago and The Geographical Distribution of Animals. By the time of his death in 1913, he was one of the world's most famous people.

During Wallace’s lifetime the theory of natural selection was often referred to as the Darwin- Wallace theory and the highest possible honours were bestowed on him for his role as its co- discoverer. These include the Darwin–Wallace and Linnean Gold Medals of the Linnean Society of London; the Copley, Darwin and Royal Medals of the Royal Society (Britain's premier scientific body); and the Order of Merit (awarded by the ruling Monarch as the highest civilian honour of Great Britain). It was only in the 20th Century that Wallace’s star dimmed while Darwin’s burned ever more brightly. 

So why then did this happen?

The reason may be as follows: in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, natural selection as an explanation for evolutionary change became unpopular, with most biologists adopting alternative theories such as neo-Lamarckism, orthogenesis, or the mutation theory. It was only with the modern evolutionary synthesis of the 1930s and ’40s that it became widely accepted that natural selection is indeed the primary driving force of evolution. By then, however, the history of its discovery had largely been forgotten and many wrongly assumed that the idea had first been published in Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. Thanks to the so-called ‘Darwin Industry’ of recent decades, Darwin’s fame has increased exponentially, eclipsing the important contributions of his contemporaries, like Wallace. A more balanced, accurate and detailed history of the discovery of what has been referred to as “...arguably the most momentous idea ever to occur to a human mind” is long overdue.

ENDNOTES

1. Wallace, A. R. 1855. On the law which has regulated the introduction of new species. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 16 (2nd series): 184-196.

2. Letter from Darwin to Charles Lyell dated 18th [June 1858] (Darwin Correspondence Database, http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-2285 accessed 20/01/2013).

3. These were an extract from Darwin’s unpublished essay on evolution of 1844, plus the enclosure from a letter dated 5th September 1857, which Darwin had written to the American botanist Asa Gray.

4. Publishing another person’s work without their agreement was as unacceptable then as it is today. Publishing someone’s novel theory without their consent, prefixed by material designed to give priority of the idea to someone else is ethically highly questionable: Wallace should have been consulted first! Fortunately for Darwin and his supporters, Wallace appeared to be pleased by what has been called the ‘delicate arrangement’.

5. In a letter from Joseph Hooker to Darwin dated 13th and 15th July 1858 (Darwin Correspondence Database, http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-2307 accessed 20/01/2013), Hooker stated " I send the proofs from Linnæan Socy— Make any alterations you please..."

6. In a letter from Darwin to Charles Lyell dated 18th [June 1858] (Darwin Correspondence Database, http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-2285 accessed 20/01/2013), Darwin, who was referring to Wallace's essay, says "Please return me the M.S. [manuscript] which he does not say he wishes me to publish..." and in a letter from Darwin to Charles Lyell dated [25th June 1858] (Darwin Correspondence Database, http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-2294 accessed 20/01/2013), Darwin states that "Wallace says nothing about publication..."

7. Letter from Wallace to A. B. Meyer dated 22nd November 1869 cited in Meyer, A. B. 1895. How was Wallace led to the discovery of natural selection? Nature, 52(1348): 415.

8. See Rachels, J. 1986. Darwin's moral lapse. National Forum: 22-24 (pdf available at http://www.jamesrachels.org/DML.pdf)

9. Letter from Wallace to George Silk dated 1st September 1860 (WCP373 in Beccaloni, G. W. (Ed.). 2012. Wallace Letters Online www.nhm.ac.uk/wallacelettersonline [accessed 20/01/2013])

OTHER NOTES

Please cite this article as: Beccaloni, G. W. 2013. Alfred Russel Wallace and Natural Selection: the Real Story. <http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/tv/junglehero/alfred-wallace-biography.pdf>
This article is a slightly modified version of the introduction by George Beccaloni to the following privately published book: Preston, T. (Ed.). 2013. The Letter from Ternate. UK: TimPress. 96 pp.
Categories: Development

My Presentation at APEX Connect 2016

Denes Kubicek - Wed, 2016-04-06 11:12
On 28th of April I will be presenting at APEX Connect in Berlin. The topic is Integration of APEX with HERE Maps. If you are interested to see how you can integrate APEX with Maps (HERE or Google or some other) please join the presentation. The best thing is that this integration ist done using APEX Plugins only. I will try to show as many functionalities as possible including Routing, Tracing, Positioning and a combination of all the features together.

Categories: Development

Machine Learning for Oracle Developers

Gerger Consulting - Mon, 2016-04-04 02:51
Oracle doesn't offer any solutions for machine learning. It is time for Oracle developers to look elsewhere.

If you don't know where to start, attend our webinar and find out how you can apply Numenta's open source machine learning technology to real world enterprise IT problems.



Categories: Development

Machine Intelligence for Enterprise IT

Gerger Consulting - Wed, 2016-03-30 00:59
The need to gain actionable insights from ever increasing data sets is a huge problem for BI professionals. Attend our webinar presented by Numenta, a machine intelligence company founded by Jeff Hawkins (the founder of Palm Inc.), and learn how machine intelligence can help you solve real world enterprise IT problems.

Watch the short video about Numenta's story and the importance of their approach to machine learning:



If you want to learn how to use machine intelligence for analytics, this is the webinar to attend.






Categories: Development

My Demo Application

Denes Kubicek - Mon, 2016-03-28 23:34
If you experience a problem accessing My Demo Application (old and new version) at apex.oracle.com, that means there is a reason for that. One of the users deleted all the applications in my workspace and installed some of his own. I don't think this was intended but it is still a lot of work and I am trying to geta all the important stuff back online. After that I will need to rethink the way of accessing the workspace. It happened for the second time within the last four months.

Categories: Development

Calling REST Services from Application Builder Cloud Service

Shay Shmeltzer - Mon, 2016-03-21 15:33

One of the frequent requests we get when we demo ABCS is - can I invoke some external functionality that is exposed as a REST service and pass parameters to it.

Well, with a minimal amount of JavaScript coding you can do it in the current version. 

I recorded the demo below that shows you how to do that.

I'm leveraging a public REST API that github exposes to get a list of repositories for a user. The service is available at https://api.github.com/users/oracle/repos

I then design an ABCS page that has a parameter field, a button that invokes the REST/JSON call, and a placeholder for results. It looks like this: 

In addition the video also shows some other techniques that are useful, including:

  • How to create a new blank data entry page
  • How to add custom component that renders HTML content
  • How to add a button that calls a REST service
  • How to pass a parameter to the JavaScript custom code
  • How to set a page to be the default page of the app
  • How to stage your application for external testing

&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;span id=&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;XinhaEditingPostion&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;&amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/span&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

It seems that right now you are restricted to accessing REST services that are secured over HTTPS protocol (which is a good thing).

Note that you of course don't have to stage the app to see it run, you can just go into live mode, or run it to see it working. I just wanted to make sure I have a demo out there that shows how staging works.

The JavaScript snippet I'm using in the video is: 

$.getJSON("https://api.github.com/users/"+ +"/repos", function(result){

$.each(result, function(i, field){

$('[name="myOutput"]').append(field.name + " ");

});

        });

resolve(); 

If you'll actually add a

$('[name="results"]').empty(); 

as the first link, it will clear the field for you each time you re-press the button. 

Categories: Development

Monitor Oracle with Zabbix

Gerger Consulting - Mon, 2016-03-21 05:09
We've got a webinar tomorrow. Attend our webinar and learn how you can monitor your Oracle Database instances with the open source monitoring tool Zabbix. Sign up at this link. More than 125 people have already signed up!




Categories: Development

Something Amiss

Greg Pavlik - Wed, 2016-03-16 23:02
Looks like this curious non-review of the novel Laurus seems to have been referring to "Brahmins" as "Brahman" - I suppose republished to correct the mistake:​Russian Brahman by Alan Jacobs | Articles | First Thingswww.firstthings.com/article/2016/04/russian-brahmanFirst Things​Russian Brahman. by Alan Jacobs April 2016. Laurus by eugene vodolazkin translated by lisa hayden oneworld, 384 pages, $24.99. Eugene Vodolazkin's ...​Russian Brahmin by Alan Jacobs | Articles | First Thingswww.firstthings.com/article/2016/04/russian-brahminFirst Things​Russian Brahmin. by Alan Jacobs April 2016. Laurus by eugene vodolazkin translated by lisa hayden oneworld, 384 pages, $24.99. Eugene Vodolazkin's ...

Whatever his grasp of Hindu concepts, it's obvious Jacobs knows little to nothing about the tradition of Russian yurodivy, which makes this review overall kind of silly at best. Interested readers can refer to the hagiographies of Xenia of Petersburg or Feofil of the Kiev Caves Lavra to become acquainted with some of the conceptual background to the novel, both published by monastery press in Jordanville, NY in English. As a complement the Pavel Lungin movie Ostrov is worth watching carefully - the film is based partly on Feofil, though like the life of St Xenia, it explores the theme of vicarious repentance. (It was not until the third time I saw the film that I fully grasped it - the visuals are stunning and in many respects a distraction.)

All of that aside, what continues to trouble me in general is the fact that most of the reviews of Laurus that I've seen have been oriented toward theological critiques - endorsements or arguments revolving around the reviewer's reading of what the author might want us to think about religion. And yet it is obvious that Vodolazkin did not write a religious apologetic (Jacobs invokes Karamazov, which is simultaneously a religious argument and a humanistic work - but Laurus is anything but the former). Laurus deserves a review as a work of notable - even great - world literature: which is to say first and foremost an exploration of what Vodolazkin is attempting to accomplish as a writer and what that has produced as a work of literature. The lack of serious analysis is particularly puzzling given the devices Vodolazkin uses to deal with language, identity, personality, relationship, and - yes - time. We could do with a few less sermons and a bit more thought.

OTN Interview about Application Development with Oracle

Shay Shmeltzer - Tue, 2016-03-15 13:34

A few weeks ago, I set down with Bob from OTN for an interview that covered some of the key products our group works on.

I covered the various frameworks (ADF, JET, MAF), what we are doing with cloud based development (DevCS) and our tools for citizen developers (ABCS).

In case you are interested in any of these acronyms here is the video:

Note that things move really fast at Oracle, and since this interview we already released a new version of Oracle JET and also made it open source, we released an update to Developer Cloud Service, and Application Builder Cloud Service has gone production.

Categories: Development

Monitoring Oracle Database with Zabbix

Gerger Consulting - Mon, 2016-03-14 07:14

Attend our free webinar and learn how you can use Zabbix, the open source monitoring solution, to monitor your Oracle Database instances? The webinar is presented by Oracle ACE and Certified Master Ronald Rood.


About the Webinar:

Enterprise IT is moving to the Cloud. With tens, hundreds even thousands of servers in the Cloud, monitoring the uptime, performance and quality of the Cloud infrastructure becomes a challenge that traditional monitoring tools struggle to solve. Enter Zabbix. Zabbix is a low footprint, low impact, open source monitoring tool that provides various notification types and integrates easily with your ticketing system. During the webinar, we'll cover the following topics:

  • Installation and configuration of Zabbix in the Cloud
  • Monitoring Oracle databases using Zabbix
  • How to use Zabbix templates to increase the quality and efficiency of your monitoring setup
  • How to setup Zabbix for large and remote networks
  • How to trigger events in Zabbix
  • Graphing with Zabbix
  • Categories: Development

    WINDOW NOSORT STOPKEY + RANK()

    XTended Oracle SQL - Fri, 2016-03-11 18:23

    Recently I found that WINDOW NOSORT STOPKEY with RANK()OVER() works very inefficiently: http://www.freelists.org/post/oracle-l/RANKWINDOW-NOSORT-STOPKEY-stopkey-doesnt-work
    The root cause of this behaviour is that Oracle optimizes WINDOW NOSORT STOPKEY with RANK the same way as with DENSE_RANK:

    rnk1

    create table test(n not null) as 
      with gen as (select level n from dual connect by level<=100)
      select g2.n as n
      from gen g1, gen g2
      where g1.n<=10
    /
    create index ix_test on test(n)
    /
    exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats('','TEST');
    select/*+ gather_plan_statistics */ n
    from (select rank()over(order by n) rnk
                ,n
          from test)
    where rnk<=3
    /
    select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor('','','allstats last'));
    drop table test purge;
    

    [collapse] Output

             N
    ----------
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
             1
    
    10 rows selected.
    
    PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    SQL_ID  8tbq95dpw0gw7, child number 0
    -------------------------------------
    select/*+ gather_plan_statistics */ n from (select rank()over(order by
    n) rnk             ,n       from test) where rnk<=3
    
    Plan hash value: 1892911073
    
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    | Id  | Operation              | Name    | Starts | E-Rows | A-Rows |   A-Time   | Buffers |  OMem |  1Mem | Used-Mem |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    |   0 | SELECT STATEMENT       |         |      1 |        |     10 |00:00:00.01 |       3 |       |       |          |
    |*  1 |  VIEW                  |         |      1 |   1000 |     10 |00:00:00.01 |       3 |       |       |          |
    |*  2 |   WINDOW NOSORT STOPKEY|         |      1 |   1000 |     30 |00:00:00.01 |       3 | 73728 | 73728 |          |
    |   3 |    INDEX FULL SCAN     | IX_TEST |      1 |   1000 |     31 |00:00:00.01 |       3 |       |       |          |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
    ---------------------------------------------------
    
       1 - filter("RNK"<=3)
       2 - filter(RANK() OVER ( ORDER BY "N")<=3)
    

    [collapse]

    As you can see, A-Rows in plan step 2 = 30 – ie, that is the number of rows where

    DENSE_RANK<=3

    but not

    RANK<=3

    The more effective way will be to stop after first 10 rows, because 11th row already has RANK more than 3!
    But we can create own STOPKEY version with PL/SQL:
    PLSQL STOPKEY version

    create or replace type rowids_table is table of varchar2(18);
    /
    create or replace function get_rowids_by_rank(
          n          int
         ,max_rank   int
       ) 
       return rowids_table pipelined
    as
    begin
       for r in (
          select/*+ index_rs_asc(t (n))  */ rowidtochar(rowid) chr_rowid, rank()over(order by n) rnk
          from test t
          where t.n > get_rowids_by_rank.n
          order by n
       )
       loop
          if r.rnk <= max_rank then
             pipe row (r.chr_rowid);
          else
             exit;
          end if;
       end loop;
       return;
    end;
    /
    select/*+ leading(r t) use_nl(t) */
       t.*
    from table(get_rowids_by_rank(1, 3)) r
        ,test t
    where t.rowid = chartorowid(r.column_value)
    /
    

    [collapse] In that case the fetch from a table will stop when rnk will be larger than max_rank

    Categories: Development

    Free Oracle Database Monitoring Webinar by Oracle ACE Ronald Rood

    Gerger Consulting - Wed, 2016-03-09 05:19
    Attend our webinar and learn how you can monitor your Oracle Database and cloud infrastructure with Zabbix, the open source monitoring tool.

    The presentation is hosted by Oracle ACE and Certified Master Ronald Rood.

    Learn more about the webinar at this link.


    Categories: Development

    Side by Side comparison: ParalleNew+CMS vs G1GC Java Garbage Collector

    Arun Bavera - Fri, 2016-03-04 17:31
    Side by Side comparison: Left ParalleNew+CMS Right:G1GC
    Verdict: With minimal intervention ParallelNew+ UseConcMarkSweepGC performs well ahead of G1GC.
    Note: This test was done on small Heap size of 90M with JDK 1.7.0.67 using Grinder and AuctionImage test application. This is small heap and application but still we see memory fragmentation with PralleNew+CMS and G1GC seems to work well in this area but performance has to improve.

    Here are test and result screens in ViisualVM and JMC.
    export USER_MEM_ARGS="-Xms90m -Xmx90m -XX:MaxPermSize=256m"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseParNewGC"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseG1GC"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UnlockCommercialFeatures"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+FlightRecorder"
    Note: All other values default:
    3.3Sec Pause 11.4 Sec Pause
    clip_image002[6]










    Three Grinder Tests with:
    Left ParalleNew+CMS Right:G1Gc
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:MaxGCPauseMillis=500"
    8.99Sec Pause 30.14Sec Pause
    clip_image002[10]

    Another three Grind Test:
    export USER_MEM_ARGS="-Xms90m -Xmx90m -XX:MaxPermSize=256m
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:MaxGCPauseMillis=500"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:NewRatio=2"
    Left: JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseParNewGC"
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC"
    Right:
    JAVA_OPTIONS+=" -XX:+UseG1GC"
    clip_image002[12]
    Result:
    Left: 8.54 Sec Pause Right: 1m+ 19.9Sec
    JFR for 2 GrindTest:
    clip_image002[14]
    clip_image002[16]
    Memory Overview Left: PrallelNew_CMS Right:G1GC
    clip_image002[18]
    Garbage Collection
    clip_image002[20]
    gcPausetime:
    clip_image002[22]
    GC Configuration:
    clip_image002[24]
    Threads CPU Usage:
    clip_image002[26]
    Lock Instances:
    clip_image002[28]
    Socket Write:
    clip_image002[30]
    System:
    clip_image002[32]
    Code Exceptions:
    clip_image002[34]
    Verdict: With minimal intervention ParallelNew+ UseConcMarkSweepGC performs well ahead of G1GC.
    Note: This test was done on small Heap size of 90M with JDK 1.7.0.67 using Grinder and AuctionImage test application. This is small heap and application but still we see memory fragmentation with PralleNew+CMS and G1GC seems to work well in this area but performance has to improve.






























































    Categories: Development

    Application Builder Cloud Service - Menus, Buttons and Validation

    Shay Shmeltzer - Fri, 2016-03-04 12:11

    Continuing with the exploration of Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service, I've picked up the application I created in the previous blog entry and added a few more things to demo how to:

    • Configure the logo and title
    • Modify and add menu items
    • Define field level validation
    • Add buttons and define their actions

    Check out this short demo:

    Categories: Development

    APEX 5 - Opening and Closing Modal Window - Part Two

    Denes Kubicek - Thu, 2016-03-03 02:34
    In this blog post from 2015 I explained how to open a modal window from an item and pass the values back, display a sucess message, etc. This page also contains an item plugin to make it easier to do the whole stuff and avoid hardcoding. I have never published this plugin. Hopefully this functionality is going to be a standard part of 5.1. Now, I was asked to make this working with a file browse item as well. I extended that example and created a new one showing how to do that with changing and clicking on a file browse item. You can see this example here. If you have an account for my workspace, you can even download the plugin and make it working in your environment. Enjoy.

    Categories: Development

    Free Webinar on Oracle Database Monitoring with Zabbix

    Gerger Consulting - Wed, 2016-03-02 01:04
    You are kindly invited to attend the free webinar hosted by Oracle ACE and Oracle Certified Master Ronald Rood: Oracle Monitoring with Zabbix. Register at this link.
    Enterprise IT is moving to the Cloud. With tens, hundreds even thousands of servers in the Cloud, monitoring the uptime, performance and quality of the Cloud infrastructure becomes a challenge that traditional monitoring tools struggle to solve. Enter Zabbix. Zabbix is a low footprint, low impact, open source monitoring tool that provides various notification types and integrates easily with your ticketing system.
    During the webinar, we'll cover the following topics:
    • Installation and configuration of Zabbix in the Cloud
    • Monitoring Oracle databases using Zabbix
    • How to use Zabbix templates to increase the quality and efficiency of your monitoring setup
    • How to setup Zabbix for large and remote networks
    • How to trigger events in Zabbix
    • Graphing with Zabbix
    Categories: Development

    Change Item Position using jQuery

    Denes Kubicek - Sun, 2016-02-28 07:51
    See this example on how to change the item position. In APEX you can position the buttons after the action bar in an interactive report. However, you can't put the items there. Using jQuery this is easy to achieve.

    Categories: Development

    React on Tab Change

    Denes Kubicek - Sun, 2016-02-28 07:47
    See this example on how to react on tab change in APEX 5. The problem is to determine the right selector to trigger the corresponding dynamic action. Thanks Christian Rokitta for your help.

    Categories: Development

    First Steps with Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service

    Shay Shmeltzer - Wed, 2016-02-24 19:22

    Last week we released a new cloud service - the Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service.

    (I'll refer to is as ABCS here to keep it short).

    ABCS is built for the non-professional developer, what some call the citizen developer, giving them a solution to very quickly build and publish applications that can address immediate business needs. As you'll see in the demo below, a UI first approach makes development very simple.

    I recorded a quick demo to show you just the basics of app development and wet your appetite.

    As you'll see ABCS makes it dead simple to create Web apps, define business objects that you want to track (implemented as tables in an Oracle cloud database instance), and fine tune the UI creating multiple forms. The underlying UI technology of both ABCS and the apps that it creates is Oracle JET. 

    Note that in this video I didn't cover the steps to actually stage and then publish your application so other users can access it - another thing that ABCS makes simple. On these and other capabilities in future blogs...

    Categories: Development

    Advanced SQL Webinar on February 23

    Gerger Consulting - Mon, 2016-02-22 06:58
    On February 23, Oracle ACE Kim Berg Hansen is hosting a free webinar about pattern matching with SQL in Oracle 12c. More than 140 developers have already signed up. Register at this link.


    Categories: Development