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big thanks to Jim Czuprynski for NEOOUG meeting presentations

Grumpy old DBA - Mon, 2014-09-22 16:56
Jim the smooth talking always motivated Oracle Ace Director did two great presentations for us here at NEOOUG on Friday September 19th.

His presentations can be found 12c SQL that almost tunes itself and 12c How hot is your data?

Thanks Jim!
Categories: DBA Blogs

Where is my space on Linux filesystem?

Surachart Opun - Mon, 2014-09-22 05:06
Not Often, I checked about my space after made filesystem on Linux. Today, I have made Ext4 filesystem around 460GB, I found it 437GB only. Some path should be 50GB, but it was available only 47GB.
Thank You @OracleAlchemist and @gokhanatil for good information about it.
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV   50G   52M   47G   1% /u01
Reference  - It's for specify the percentage of the filesystem blocks reserved for the super-user. This avoids fragmentation, and allows root-owned daemons, such as syslogd(8), to continue to function correctly after non-privileged processes are prevented from writing to the  filesystem. The default percentage is 5%.After I found out more information. Look like we can set it to zero, but we should not set it to zero for /,/var,/tmp or which path has lots of file creates and deletes.Reference on RedHatIf you set the reserved block count to zero, it won't affect
performance much except if you run for long periods of time (with lots
of file creates and deletes) while the filesystem is almost full
(i.e., say above 95%), at which point you'll be subject to
fragmentation problems.  Ext4's multi-block allocator is much more
fragmentation resistant, because it tries much harder to find
contiguous blocks, so even if you don't enable the other ext4
features, you'll see better results simply mounting an ext3 filesystem
using ext4 before the filesystem gets completely full.
If you are just using the filesystem for long-term archive, where
files aren't changing very often (i.e., a huge mp3 or video store), it
obviously won't matter.
- TedExample: Changed reserved-blocks-percentage [root@mytest01 u01]# df -h /u01
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV   50G   52M   47G   1% /u01
[root@mytest01 u01]# tune2fs -m 1 /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV
tune2fs 1.43-WIP (20-Jun-2013)
Setting reserved blocks percentage to 1% (131072 blocks)
[root@mytest01 u01]# df -h /u01
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV   50G   52M   49G   1% /u01
[root@mytest01 u01]# tune2fs -m 5 /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV
tune2fs 1.43-WIP (20-Jun-2013)
Setting reserved blocks percentage to 5% (655360 blocks)
[root@mytest01 u01]# df -h /u01
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV   50G   52M   47G   1% /u01Finally, I knew it was reserved for super-user. Checked more for calculation.
[root@ottuatdb01 ~]# df -m /u01
Filesystem                  1M-blocks  Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV     50269    52     47657   1% /u01
[root@ottuatdb01 ~]#  tune2fs -l /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U01LV |egrep  'Block size|Reserved block count'
Reserved block count:     655360
Block size:               4096

Available = 47657MB
Used = 52M
Reserved Space = (655360 x 4096) / 1024 /1024 = 2560MB 
Total = 47657 + 2560 + 52 = 50269 

OK.. I felt good after it cleared for me. Somehow, I believe On Hug space, 5% of the filesystem blocks reserved that's too much. We can reduce it.

Other Links:
https://www.redhat.com/archives/ext3-users/2009-January/msg00026.html
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/7950/reserved-space-for-root-on-a-filesystem-why
http://linux.die.net/man/8/tune2fs
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/ext4#Remove_reserved_blocks

Written By: Surachart Opun http://surachartopun.com
Categories: DBA Blogs

Extend linux partition on vmware

Surachart Opun - Mon, 2014-09-22 02:24
It was a quiet day, I worked as System Administrator and installed Oracle Linux on Virtual Machine guest. After installed Operating System, I wanted to extend disk on guest. So, I extended disk on guest. Anyway, I came back in my head what I was supposed to do on Linux then ? - Create new disk (and Physical Volume) and then add in Volume Group.http://surachartopun.com/2012/01/just-add-disk-to-volume-group-linux.htmlChecked my partition:[root@mytest01 ~]# fdisk -l /dev/sda
Disk /dev/sda: 697.9 GB, 697932185600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 84852 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061d87
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1         131     1048576   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2             131       78326   628096000   8e  Linux LVM
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda2
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  PV Size               599.00 GiB / not usable 3.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              153343
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          153343
  PV UUID               AcujnG-5XVc-TWWl-O4Oe-Nv03-rJtc-b5jUlWI thought I should be able to extend (resize) /dev/sda2 - Found out on the Internet, get some example.http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/42857/how-to-extend-centos-5-partition-on-vmware
- Extend Physical Volume (Chose this idea)
Started to do it: Idea is Deleting/Recreating/run "pvresize".[root@mytest01 ~]# fdisk /dev/sda
WARNING: DOS-compatible mode is deprecated. It's strongly recommended to
         switch off the mode (command 'c') and change display units to
         sectors (command 'u').
Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sda: 697.9 GB, 697932185600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 84852 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061d87
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1         131     1048576   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2             131       78326   628096000   8e  Linux LVM
Command (m for help): d
Partition number (1-4): 2
Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sda: 697.9 GB, 697932185600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 84852 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061d87
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1         131     1048576   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
Command (m for help): n
Command action
   e   extended
   p   primary partition (1-4)
p
Partition number (1-4): 2
First cylinder (131-84852, default 131):
Using default value 131
Last cylinder, +cylinders or +size{K,M,G} (131-84852, default 84852):
Using default value 84852
Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sda: 697.9 GB, 697932185600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 84852 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061d87
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1         131     1048576   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2             131       84852   680524090   83  Linux
Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 2
Hex code (type L to list codes): L
 0  Empty           24  NEC DOS         81  Minix / old Lin bf  Solaris
 1  FAT12           39  Plan 9          82  Linux swap / So c1  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
 2  XENIX root      3c  PartitionMagic  83  Linux           c4  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
 3  XENIX usr       40  Venix 80286     84  OS/2 hidden C:  c6  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
 4  FAT16 <32m 85="" boot="" br="" c7="" extended="" inux="" nbsp="" prep="" yrinx=""> 5  Extended        42  SFS             86  NTFS volume set da  Non-FS data
 6  FAT16           4d  QNX4.x          87  NTFS volume set db  CP/M / CTOS / .
 7  HPFS/NTFS       4e  QNX4.x 2nd part 88  Linux plaintext de  Dell Utility
 8  AIX             4f  QNX4.x 3rd part 8e  Linux LVM       df  BootIt
 9  AIX bootable    50  OnTrack DM      93  Amoeba          e1  DOS access
 a  OS/2 Boot Manag 51  OnTrack DM6 Aux 94  Amoeba BBT      e3  DOS R/O
 b  W95 FAT32       52  CP/M            9f  BSD/OS          e4  SpeedStor
 c  W95 FAT32 (LBA) 53  OnTrack DM6 Aux a0  IBM Thinkpad hi eb  BeOS fs
 e  W95 FAT16 (LBA) 54  OnTrackDM6      a5  FreeBSD         ee  GPT
 f  W95 Ext'd (LBA) 55  EZ-Drive        a6  OpenBSD         ef  EFI (FAT-12/16/
10  OPUS            56  Golden Bow      a7  NeXTSTEP        f0  Linux/PA-RISC b
11  Hidden FAT12    5c  Priam Edisk     a8  Darwin UFS      f1  SpeedStor
12  Compaq diagnost 61  SpeedStor       a9  NetBSD          f4  SpeedStor
14  Hidden FAT16 <3 63="" ab="" arwin="" boot="" br="" f2="" hurd="" nbsp="" or="" secondary="" sys="">16  Hidden FAT16    64  Novell Netware  af  HFS / HFS+      fb  VMware VMFS
17  Hidden HPFS/NTF 65  Novell Netware  b7  BSDI fs         fc  VMware VMKCORE
18  AST SmartSleep  70  DiskSecure Mult b8  BSDI swap       fd  Linux raid auto
1b  Hidden W95 FAT3 75  PC/IX           bb  Boot Wizard hid fe  LANstep
1c  Hidden W95 FAT3 80  Old Minix       be  Solaris boot    ff  BBT
1e  Hidden W95 FAT1
Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e
Changed system type of partition 2 to 8e (Linux LVM)
Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sda: 697.9 GB, 697932185600 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 84852 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061d87
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1         131     1048576   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2             131       84852   680524090   8e  Linux LVM
Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered!
Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
WARNING: Re-reading the partition table failed with error 16: Device or resource busy.
The kernel still uses the old table. The new table will be used at
the next reboot or after you run partprobe(8) or kpartx(8)
Syncing disks. -- I chose to "Reboot" :-) --[root@mytest01 ~]# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda2
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  PV Size               599.00 GiB / not usable 3.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              153343
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          153343
  PV UUID               AcujnG-5XVc-TWWl-O4Oe-Nv03-rJtc-b5jUlW
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvresize /dev/sda2
  Physical volume "/dev/sda2" changed
  1 physical volume(s) resized / 0 physical volume(s) not resized
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda2
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  PV Size               599.00 GiB / not usable 2.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              153343
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          153343
  PV UUID               AcujnG-5XVc-TWWl-O4Oe-Nv03-rJtc-b5jUlW
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# reboot
.
.
.
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda2
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  PV Size               599.00 GiB / not usable 2.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              153343
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          153343
  PV UUID               AcujnG-5XVc-TWWl-O4Oe-Nv03-rJtc-b5jUlW
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvresize  /dev/sda2
  Physical volume "/dev/sda2" changed
  1 physical volume(s) resized / 0 physical volume(s) not resized
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda2
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  PV Size               649.00 GiB / not usable 1.31 MiB
  Allocatable           yes
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              166143
  Free PE               12800
  Allocated PE          153343
  PV UUID               AcujnG-5XVc-TWWl-O4Oe-Nv03-rJtc-b5jUlWNote: This case I had 2 partitions (/dev/sda1, /dev/sda2). So, it was a good idea extending Physical Disk. However, I thought creating physical volume and adding in Volume Group, that might be safer. 
Finally, I had VolGroup0 with new size, then extended Logical Volume.[root@mytest01 ~]# df -h /u02
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV  460G   70M  437G   1% /u02
[root@mytest01 ~]# lvdisplay /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/VolGroup0/U02LV
  LV Name                U02LV
  VG Name                VolGroup0
  LV UUID                8Gdt6C-ZXQe-dPYi-21yj-Fs0i-6uvE-vzrCbc
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time mytest01.pythian.com, 2014-09-21 16:43:50 -0400
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                467.00 GiB
  Current LE             119551
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           252:2

[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# vgdisplay
  --- Volume group ---
  VG Name               VolGroup0
  System ID
  Format                lvm2
  Metadata Areas        1
  Metadata Sequence No  7
  VG Access             read/write
  VG Status             resizable
  MAX LV                0
  Cur LV                4
  Open LV               3
  Max PV                0
  Cur PV                1
  Act PV                1
  VG Size               649.00 GiB
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              166143
  Alloc PE / Size       153343 / 599.00 GiB
  Free  PE / Size       12800 / 50.00 GiB
  VG UUID               thGxdJ-pCi2-18S0-mrZc-cCJM-2SH2-JRpfQ5
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# -- Should use "e2fsck" in case resize (shrink). This case no need.
[root@mytest01 ~]# e2fsck -f  /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV 
e2fsck 1.43-WIP (20-Jun-2013)
Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks, and sizes
Pass 2: Checking directory structure
Pass 3: Checking directory connectivity
Pass 4: Checking reference counts
Pass 5: Checking group summary information
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV: 11/30605312 files (0.0% non-contiguous), 1971528/122420224 blocks
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# pvscan
  PV /dev/sda2   VG VolGroup0   lvm2 [649.00 GiB / 50.00 GiB free]
  Total: 1 [649.00 GiB] / in use: 1 [649.00 GiB] / in no VG: 0 [0   ]
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# lvextend -L +50G /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV
  Extending logical volume U02LV to 517.00 GiB
  Logical volume U02LV successfully resized
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]#  resize2fs /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV
resize2fs 1.43-WIP (20-Jun-2013)
Resizing the filesystem on /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV to 135527424 (4k) blocks.
The filesystem on /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV is now 135527424 blocks long.
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]#
[root@mytest01 ~]# lvdisplay /dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/VolGroup0/U02LV
  LV Name                U02LV
  VG Name                VolGroup0
  LV UUID                8Gdt6C-ZXQe-dPYi-21yj-Fs0i-6uvE-vzrCbc
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time mytest01.pythian.com, 2014-09-21 16:43:50 -0400
  LV Status              available
  # open                 0
  LV Size                517.00 GiB
  Current LE             132351
  Segments               2
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           252:2
[root@mytest01 ~]#

[root@mytest01 ~]# df -h /u02
Filesystem                   Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup0-U02LV  509G   70M  483G   1% /u02https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Storage_Administration_Guide/ext4grow.html
Note: resize2fs can use online, If the filesystem is mounted, it  can  be  used  to expand  the size of the mounted filesystem, assuming the kernel supports on-line resizing.  (As of this writing, the Linux 2.6 kernel supports on-line resize for filesystems mounted using ext3 and ext4.).
Look like today, I learned too much about linux partitioning. Written By: Surachart Opun http://surachartopun.com
Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 – Bloggers Meetup

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-19 15:35

Oracle OpenWorld Bloggers Meetup Guess what? You all know that it’s coming, when it’s coming and where… That’s right! The Annual Oracle Bloggers Meetup, one of your top favourite events of OpenWorld, is happening at usual place and time.

What: Oracle Bloggers Meetup 2014

When: Wed, 1-Oct-2014, 5:30pm

Where: Main Dining Room, Jillian’s Billiards @ Metreon, 101 Fourth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 (street view). Please comment with “COUNT ME IN” if coming — we need to know the attendance numbers.


Traditionally, Oracle Technology Network and Pythian sponsor the venue and drinks. We will also have some cool things happening and a few prizes.

In the age of Big Data and Internet of Things, our mingling activity this year will be virtual — using an app we wrote specifically for this event, so bring your iStuff and Androids to participate and win. Hope this will work! :)

As usual, vintage t-shirts, ties, or bandanas from previous meetups will make you look cool — feel free to wear them.

For those of you who don’t know the history: The Bloggers Meetup during Oracle OpenWorld was started by Mark Rittman and continued by Eddie Awad, and then I picked up the flag in 2009 (gosh…  6 years already?) The meetups have been a great success for making new friends and catching up with old, so let’s keep them this way! To give you an idea, here are the photos from the OOW08 Bloggers Meetup (courtesy of Eddie Awad) and OOW09 meetup blog post update from myself, and a super cool video by a good blogging friend, Bjorn Roest from OOW13.

While the initial meetings were mostly targeted to Oracle database folks, guys and gals from many Oracle technologies — Oracle database, MySQL, Apps, Sun technologies, Java and more join in the fun. All bloggers are welcome. We estimate to gather around 150 bloggers.

If you are planning to attend, please comment here with the phrase “COUNT ME IN”. This will help us ensure we have the attendance numbers right. Please provide your blog URL with your comment — it’s a Bloggers Meetup after all! Make sure you comment here if you are attending so that we have enough room, food, and (most importantly) drinks.

Of course, do not forget to blog and tweet about this year’s bloggers meetup. See you there!

Categories: DBA Blogs

Log Buffer #389, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-19 07:23

As the Oracle Open World draws near, bloggers of MySQL and Oracle are getting more excited and productive. SQL Server bloggers are also not far behind. This Blog Edition covers that all.

Oracle:

What’s New With Fast Data at Oracle Open World 2014?

JASPIC improvements in WebLogic 12.1.3 Arjan Tijms.

Larry Ellison Stepping Down as Chief of Oracle.

Mobilizing E-Business Suite with Oracle MAF and FMW at OOW 14.

Oracle ISV Engineering @ Oracle OpenWorld 2014.

SQL Server:

How to create Data Mining Reports using Reporting Services.

Azure Virtual Machines Part 0: A VM Primer.

Stairway to PowerPivot and DAX – Level 7: Function / Iterator Function Pairs: The DAX AVERAGE() and AVERAGEX() Functions.

Free eBook: SQL Server Transaction Log Management.

The Mindset of the Enterprise DBA: Harnessing the Power of Automation.

MySQL:

MySQL 5.6.20 on POWER.

Announcing TokuDB v7.5: Read Free Replication.

Global Transaction ID (GTID) is one of the most compelling new features of MySQL 5.6.

Managing big data? Say ‘hello’ to HP Vertica.

Tweaking MySQL Galera Cluster to handle large databases – open_files_limit.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Switch CentOS to Oracle Linux - centos2ol.sh

Surachart Opun - Fri, 2014-09-19 04:15
My time has used much with Linux. Some people asked to move from CentOS to Oracle Linux somehow. I used to believe it easy to do like that. Anyway, It'd better to test. I focused on 2 links.
https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos/
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37670_01/E37355/html/ol_switch_yum.html

Oracle introduces centos2ol.sh script that can convert CentOS 5 and 6 systems to Oracle Linux. After that run "yum upgrade" again.
[root@test-centos ~]# uname -r
2.6.32-431.29.2.el6.x86_64
[root@test-centos ~]# cat /etc/centos-release
CentOS release 6.5 (Final)
[root@test-centos ~]# curl -O https://linux.oracle.com/switch/centos2ol.sh
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
100  6523  100  6523    0     0   3453      0  0:00:01  0:00:01 --:--:-- 17534
[root@test-centos ~]# sh centos2ol.sh
Checking for required packages...
Checking your distribution...
Looking for yumdownloader...
Finding your repository directory...
Downloading Oracle Linux yum repository file...
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
100  4233  100  4233    0     0   3507      0  0:00:01  0:00:01 --:--:--  4724
Removing unsupported packages...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
Setting up Remove Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package libreport-plugin-rhtsupport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport for package: abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-plugin-rhtsupport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package abrt-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-compat.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libreport-compat = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
---> Package libreport-python.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Running transaction check
---> Package libreport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_dbus.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_web.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libabrt_web.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport.so.0()(64bit) for package: abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport >= 2.0.9-16 for package: abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Processing Dependency: libreport = 2.0.9-19.el6.centos for package: libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64
--> Running transaction check
---> Package abrt.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-ccpp.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-addon-python.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-libs.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package abrt-tui.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-logger.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-mailx.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
---> Package libreport-plugin-reportuploader.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos will be erased
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                   | 1.2 kB     00:00
ol6_UEK_latest/primary                                                                                                                           |  16 MB     00:08
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                       | 1.4 kB     00:00
ol6_latest/primary                                                                                                                               |  41 MB     00:21
Dependencies Resolved
========================================================================================================================================================================
 Package                                        Arch                  Version                             Repository                                               Size
========================================================================================================================================================================
Removing:
 libreport-plugin-rhtsupport                    x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 74 k
Removing for dependencies:
 abrt                                           x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                706 k
 abrt-addon-ccpp                                x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                189 k
 abrt-addon-kerneloops                          x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 25 k
 abrt-addon-python                              x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 20 k
 abrt-cli                                       x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                0.0
 abrt-libs                                      x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 24 k
 abrt-tui                                       x86_64                2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 15 k
 libreport                                      x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                1.2 M
 libreport-cli                                  x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 26 k
 libreport-compat                               x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                7.4 k
 libreport-plugin-kerneloops                    x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 18 k
 libreport-plugin-logger                        x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 23 k
 libreport-plugin-mailx                         x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 32 k
 libreport-plugin-reportuploader                x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 32 k
 libreport-python                               x86_64                2.0.9-19.el6.centos                 @anaconda-CentOS-201311272149.x86_64/6.5                 72 k
Transaction Summary
========================================================================================================================================================================
Remove       16 Package(s)
Installed size: 2.4 M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
  Erasing    : abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 1/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                    2/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                          3/16
  Erasing    : abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 4/16
  Erasing    : abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        5/16
  Erasing    : abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                     6/16
  Erasing    : abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                7/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              8/16
  Erasing    : libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                            9/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                 10/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                  11/16
  Erasing    : libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        12/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                         13/16
  Erasing    : libreport-plugin-rhtsupport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                             14/16
  Erasing    : libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        15/16
  Erasing    : libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                               16/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-mailx-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                   1/16
  Verifying  : libreport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                2/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-logger-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                  3/16
  Verifying  : abrt-tui-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                 4/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-kerneloops-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              5/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-rhtsupport-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                              6/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-kerneloops-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                    7/16
  Verifying  : libreport-compat-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                         8/16
  Verifying  : abrt-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                     9/16
  Verifying  : abrt-libs-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                               10/16
  Verifying  : libreport-python-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                        11/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-python-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                       12/16
  Verifying  : libreport-plugin-reportuploader-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                         13/16
  Verifying  : abrt-cli-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                                14/16
  Verifying  : libreport-cli-2.0.9-19.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                           15/16
  Verifying  : abrt-addon-ccpp-2.0.8-21.el6.centos.x86_64                                                                                                         16/16
Removed:
  libreport-plugin-rhtsupport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
Dependency Removed:
  abrt.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                   abrt-addon-ccpp.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                 abrt-addon-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos
  abrt-addon-python.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos      abrt-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos                        abrt-libs.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos
  abrt-tui.x86_64 0:2.0.8-21.el6.centos               libreport.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos                       libreport-cli.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
  libreport-compat.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos       libreport-plugin-kerneloops.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos     libreport-plugin-logger.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
  libreport-plugin-mailx.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos libreport-plugin-reportuploader.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos libreport-python.x86_64 0:2.0.9-19.el6.centos
Complete!
Backing up and removing old repository files...
Downloading Oracle Linux release package...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Determining fastest mirrors
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                                  351/351
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                                  26103/26103
oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                     |  22 kB     00:00
redhat-release-server-6Server-6.5.0.1.0.1.el6.x86_64.rpm                                                                                         | 2.6 kB     00:00
Switching old release package with Oracle Linux...
warning: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64.rpm: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID ec551f03: NOKEY
Installing base packages for Oracle Linux...
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
Determining fastest mirrors
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                   | 1.2 kB     00:00
ol6_UEK_latest/primary                                                                                                                           |  16 MB     00:09
ol6_UEK_latest                                                                                                                                                  351/351
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                       | 1.4 kB     00:00
ol6_latest/primary                                                                                                                               |  41 MB     00:21
ol6_latest                                                                                                                                                  26103/26103
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.el6 will be updated
---> Package basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.0.1.el6 will be an update
---> Package grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.el6_5 will be updated
---> Package grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5 will be an update
---> Package grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.el6 will be updated
---> Package grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.0.4.el6 will be an update
---> Package initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4 will be updated
---> Package initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4 will be an update
---> Package oracle-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-1.0.1.el6 will be obsoleting
---> Package oraclelinux-release-notes.x86_64 0:6Server-11 will be installed
---> Package plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1 will be updated
---> Package plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 will be an update
--> Processing Dependency: plymouth-core-libs = 0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 for package: plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64
---> Package redhat-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-12.el6.centos will be obsoleted
--> Running transaction check
---> Package plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1 will be updated
---> Package plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1 will be an update
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
Dependencies Resolved
========================================================================================================================================================================
 Package                                          Arch                          Version                                         Repository                         Size
========================================================================================================================================================================
Installing:
 oracle-logos                                     noarch                        60.0.14-1.0.1.el6                               ol6_latest                         12 M
     replacing  redhat-logos.noarch 60.0.14-12.el6.centos
 oraclelinux-release-notes                        x86_64                        6Server-11                                      ol6_latest                         77 k
Updating:
 basesystem                                       noarch                        10.0-4.0.1.el6                                  ol6_latest                        4.3 k
 grub                                             x86_64                        1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5                             ol6_latest                        932 k
 grubby                                           x86_64                        7.0.15-5.0.4.el6                                ol6_latest                         43 k
 initscripts                                      x86_64                        9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4                           ol6_latest                        940 k
 plymouth                                         x86_64                        0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1                            ol6_latest                         89 k
Updating for dependencies:
 plymouth-core-libs                               x86_64                        0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1                            ol6_latest                         88 k
Transaction Summary
========================================================================================================================================================================
Install       2 Package(s)
Upgrade       6 Package(s)
Total download size: 14 M
Downloading Packages:
(1/8): basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm                                                                                                      | 4.3 kB     00:00
(2/8): grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                         | 932 kB     00:00
(3/8): grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                        |  43 kB     00:00
(4/8): initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64.rpm                                                                                              | 940 kB     00:00
(5/8): oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch.rpm                                                                                                 |  12 MB     00:06
(6/8): oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64.rpm                                                                                           |  77 kB     00:00
(7/8): plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                  |  89 kB     00:00
(8/8): plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64.rpm                                                                                        |  88 kB     00:00
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total                                                                                                                                   1.5 MB/s |  14 MB     00:09
warning: rpmts_HdrFromFdno: Header V3 RSA/SHA256 Signature, key ID ec551f03: NOKEY
Retrieving key from file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-oracle
Importing GPG key 0xEC551F03:
 Userid : Oracle OSS group (Open Source Software group) <build@oss.oracle.com>
 Package: 6:oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.x86_64 (installed)
 From   : /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-oracle
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Warning: RPMDB altered outside of yum.
  Installing : oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                               1/15
  Updating   : initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64                                                                                                            2/15
  Updating   : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                      3/15
  Updating   : plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                                4/15
  Updating   : 1:grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                     5/15
  Updating   : basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                                    6/15
  Installing : oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64                                                                                                         7/15
  Updating   : grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                      8/15
  Cleanup    : 1:grub-0.97-84.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                         9/15
  Cleanup    : plymouth-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                              10/15
  Erasing    : redhat-logos-60.0.14-12.el6.centos.noarch                                                                                                          11/15
  Cleanup    : basesystem-10.0-4.el6.noarch                                                                                                                       12/15
  Cleanup    : initscripts-9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4.x86_64                                                                                                          13/15
  Cleanup    : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                    14/15
  Cleanup    : grubby-7.0.15-5.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                         15/15
  Verifying  : grubby-7.0.15-5.0.4.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                      1/15
  Verifying  : 1:grub-0.97-84.0.1.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                     2/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                                3/15
  Verifying  : initscripts-9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4.x86_64                                                                                                            4/15
  Verifying  : oracle-logos-60.0.14-1.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                               5/15
  Verifying  : oraclelinux-release-notes-6Server-11.x86_64                                                                                                         6/15
  Verifying  : basesystem-10.0-4.0.1.el6.noarch                                                                                                                    7/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1.x86_64                                                                                                      8/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                               9/15
  Verifying  : initscripts-9.03.40-2.el6.centos.4.x86_64                                                                                                          10/15
  Verifying  : plymouth-core-libs-0.8.3-27.el6.centos.1.x86_64                                                                                                    11/15
  Verifying  : grubby-7.0.15-5.el6.x86_64                                                                                                                         12/15
  Verifying  : redhat-logos-60.0.14-12.el6.centos.noarch                                                                                                          13/15
  Verifying  : 1:grub-0.97-84.el6_5.x86_64                                                                                                                        14/15
  Verifying  : basesystem-10.0-4.el6.noarch                                                                                                                       15/15
Installed:
  oracle-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-1.0.1.el6                                         oraclelinux-release-notes.x86_64 0:6Server-11
Updated:
  basesystem.noarch 0:10.0-4.0.1.el6          grub.x86_64 1:0.97-84.0.1.el6_5      grubby.x86_64 0:7.0.15-5.0.4.el6      initscripts.x86_64 0:9.03.40-2.0.1.el6_5.4
  plymouth.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1
Dependency Updated:
  plymouth-core-libs.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1
Replaced:
  redhat-logos.noarch 0:60.0.14-12.el6.centos
Complete!
Updating initrd...
Installation successful!
Run 'yum upgrade' to synchronize your installed packages
with the Oracle Linux repository.
[root@test-centos ~]# yum upgrade
.
.
.
Installed:
  kernel-uek-headers.x86_64 0:2.6.32-400.36.8.el6uek
Updated:
  autofs.x86_64 1:5.0.5-89.0.1.el6_5.2                     bfa-firmware.noarch 0:3.2.23.0-1.0.1.el6          certmonger.x86_64 0:0.61-3.0.1.el6
  coreutils.x86_64 0:8.4-31.0.1.el6_5.2                    coreutils-libs.x86_64 0:8.4-31.0.1.el6_5.2        cpuspeed.x86_64 1:1.5-20.0.1.el6_4
  crash.x86_64 0:6.1.0-5.0.1.el6                           dbus.x86_64 1:1.2.24-7.0.1.el6_3                  dbus-glib.x86_64 0:0.86-6.el6_4
  dbus-libs.x86_64 1:1.2.24-7.0.1.el6_3                    dhclient.x86_64 12:4.1.1-38.P1.0.1.el6            dhcp-common.x86_64 12:4.1.1-38.P1.0.1.el6
  dracut.noarch 0:004-336.0.1.el6_5.2                      dracut-kernel.noarch 0:004-336.0.1.el6_5.2        e2fsprogs.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6
  e2fsprogs-libs.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6                 gstreamer.x86_64 0:0.10.29-1.0.1.el6              gstreamer-tools.x86_64 0:0.10.29-1.0.1.el6
  iptables.x86_64 0:1.4.7-11.0.1.el6                       iptables-ipv6.x86_64 0:1.4.7-11.0.1.el6           irqbalance.x86_64 2:1.0.4-9.0.1.el6_5
  java-1.7.0-openjdk.x86_64 1:1.7.0.65-2.5.1.2.0.1.el6_5   kexec-tools.x86_64 0:2.0.3-3.0.10.el6             kpartx.x86_64 0:0.4.9-72.0.1.el6_5.3
  libcom_err.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6                     libgudev1.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6               libss.x86_64 0:1.42.8-1.0.1.el6
  libudev.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6                        libxml2.x86_64 0:2.7.6-14.0.1.el6_5.2             libxml2-python.x86_64 0:2.7.6-14.0.1.el6_5.2
  libxslt.x86_64 0:1.1.26-2.0.2.el6_3.1                    module-init-tools.x86_64 0:3.9-21.0.1.el6_4       nss.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5
  nss-sysinit.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5                  nss-tools.x86_64 0:3.16.1-4.0.1.el6_5             oprofile.x86_64 0:0.9.7-1.0.1.el6
  pango.x86_64 0:1.28.1-7.0.1.el6_3                        plymouth-scripts.x86_64 0:0.8.3-27.0.1.el6_5.1    policycoreutils.x86_64 0:2.0.83-19.39.0.1.el6
  ql2400-firmware.noarch 0:7.03.00-1.0.1.el6               ql2500-firmware.noarch 0:7.03.00-1.0.1.el6        redhat-lsb.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6
  redhat-lsb-compat.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6                 redhat-lsb-core.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6            redhat-lsb-graphics.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6
  redhat-lsb-printing.x86_64 0:4.0-7.0.1.el6               rsyslog.x86_64 0:5.8.10-8.0.1.el6                 selinux-policy.noarch 0:3.7.19-231.0.1.el6_5.3
  selinux-policy-targeted.noarch 0:3.7.19-231.0.1.el6_5.3  sos.noarch 0:2.2-47.0.1.el6_5.7                   system-config-network-tui.noarch 0:1.6.0.el6.3-1.0.1.el6
  systemtap-runtime.x86_64 0:2.3-4.0.1.el6_5               udev.x86_64 0:147-2.51.0.3.el6                    yum.noarch 0:3.2.29-43.0.1.el6_5
  yum-plugin-fastestmirror.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5    yum-plugin-security.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5  yum-utils.noarch 0:1.1.30-17.0.1.el6_5
Replaced:
  kernel-headers.x86_64 0:2.6.32-431.29.2.el6
Complete!

[root@test-centos ~]# cat /etc/oracle-release
Oracle Linux Server release 6.5
[root@test-centos ~]# rpm -qi --info "oraclelinux-release"
Name        : oraclelinux-release          Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version     : 6Server                           Vendor: Oracle America
Release     : 5.0.2                         Build Date: Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:50 AM ICT
Install Date: Fri 19 Sep 2014 03:54:33 PM ICT      Build Host: ca-build44.us.oracle.com
Group       : System Environment/Base       Source RPM: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.src.rpm
Size        : 49559                            License: GPL
Signature   : RSA/8, Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:56 AM ICT, Key ID 72f97b74ec551f03
Summary     : Oracle Linux 6 release file
Description :
System release and information files
Name        : oraclelinux-release          Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version     : 6Server                           Vendor: Oracle America
Release     : 5.0.2                         Build Date: Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:50 AM ICT
Install Date: Fri 19 Sep 2014 03:54:33 PM ICT      Build Host: ca-build44.us.oracle.com
Group       : System Environment/Base       Source RPM: oraclelinux-release-6Server-5.0.2.src.rpm
Size        : 49559                            License: GPL
Signature   : RSA/8, Sat 23 Nov 2013 02:14:56 AM ICT, Key ID 72f97b74ec551f03
Summary     : Oracle Linux 6 release file
Description :
System release and information files
[root@test-centos ~]#It's very fast... Written By: Surachart Opun http://surachartopun.com
Categories: DBA Blogs

Datafile space reclaimable report.

DBA Scripts and Articles - Thu, 2014-09-18 14:45

This script will help you find the space reclaimable in your datafiles, it finds the High Water Mark of all your datafiles (the minimum size) and then report the following information: Datafile Size Datafile HWM Percentage of space reclaimable Command to resize the datafile Total space reclaimable in your datafiles Percentage of space reclaimable in your datafiles Find space reclaimable [...]

The post Datafile space reclaimable report. appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

2013 Chevrolet Spark lt for sale

Ameed Taylor - Wed, 2014-09-17 21:36
The 2013 Chevrolet Spark lt for sale minicar is the littlest Chevy offered in the U.s. in a couple of years. focused at Millennial benefactors, it could be intended to be minimal effort, bright, and digitally empowered for first-time auto supporters who to discover their cell phones more intriguing than new vehicles.

The minimal 5-entryway hatchback contends with a climbing workforce of minicars that gimmicks the MINI Cooper that dispatched the stage inside the U.s., the new Fiat 500, the Mitsubishi i electrical auto, and a couple of two-seat passages, the developing old savvy Fortwo and the new Scion iq.

actually assuming its 12-foot-1-inch length is unequivocally three toes shorter than a Chevrolet Cruze smaller 4-entryway vehicle, the Spark does not so much show up as little as it seems to be. best in scale- -stopped beside an amusement utility auto, as a sample -is its fitting measurement prominent.

The creators have accomplished all that they may to blanket the Spark's extents. its a tall auto roosted on little 15-inch wheels, however stress strains, dark plastic boards that proceed with the window line, and a vast Chevy twin-opening grille help to conceal the chunk sided, scorn nosed field-on-wheels show up.

The handles for the back entryways are stowed away operating at a profit plastic trim, which Chevy says gives the auto a "roadster like" appear. we don't in all actuality buy that, however outwardly the back entryways don't fundamentally learn as entryways on first look. while the back completion is everything except vertical, a long top spoiler stretches out to edge the back window opening, offering profundity to the back and bettering the Spark's aeromechanics too.

inside, the textured hard-plastic dash makes no attempt and camouflage what its through copying another topic. so also, the seats are unashamedly manufactured material. however constitution color embeds on the entryway trim, inside the entryway boxes, and on the dashboard include a sprightly stress. They take notice the painted inside steel found in economy autos of the Sixties, despite the fact that inside the Spark they may be all body-color plastic presented for effect.

Like its vast sibling the Sonic, the Spark has a "motorbike model" instrument case mounted on the direction section. It suits a speedometer and a little auto learning show. the base Spark has a little monochrome center showcase, yet all LT trim levels work a 7-inch coloration touchscreen show inside the heart stack.

there is only one motor in the Spark, a 84-pull 1.2-liter four-barrel Ecotec that puts out eighty three lb-toes of torque. The Spark comes same old with a five-velocity handbook gearbox, and a four-pace automated transmission will likewise be requested for an extra $925. Forceful driving with the aide can hustle the little Spark by means of town acceptably, however the robotized is, honestly, a puppy. Its first gear is inordinate sufficient that quickening a long way from stoplights shows up excruciatingly steady, and it would not appear to offer such a great amount of punch at any velocity or in any apparatuses. this is one auto for which the handbook gearbox may be the main conceivable choice.

The 2013 Chevrolet Spark lt for sale with the aide transmission is EPA-evaluated at 32 mpg city, 38 mpg thruway, for a blended score of 34 mpg- -comparable to the rest inside the class, however sensibly lower than a considerable amount of bigger reduced vehicles, which benefit from higher the study of air. the programmed model is accessible in lower, at a consolidated 32 mpg (28 mpg city, 37 mpg road). The Spark runs on consistent evaluation gas, in spite of the fact that; the Fiat 500 prescribes top rate gas.

The Spark's ride is somewhat firm, by and by it dealt with broken NY city roads with aplomb- -despite the fact that riders had been mindful of each knock, pothole, edge, and swell. its tall enough that travelers will truly feel the Spark inclining toward difficult corners, nonetheless its reasonably little wheels and tires toiled grave to convey the road. the electric force direction deals some interstate feel, and though its barely ever as charming to throw round as the MINI Cooper, the Spark can trade paths into spaces diverse autos couldn't fit into, and it is a delight to stop. Our starting force provided for us no probability to test the Spark at 75-mph turnpike speeds.

within, the Spark's seats are physically movable yet agreeable -if a tad bit thin for broad channeled American travelers. The back seatback is upright, yet with to some degree arrangement between front- and once more seat riders, four adult male people can possess the Spark and go in reasonable house. that is more than can additionally be expressed for the MINI Cooper or Fiat 500, actually assuming the Mitsubishi i electric auto -the main other 5-entryway hatchback on this arrangement -bargains also shocking back seat space too.

With the back seat up, the Spark has 11.four cubic feet of load territory -enough to hold 10 to 12 full paper staple gear without issues -which grows to 31.2 cubic toes when the 60/40 part back seat is flipped and collapsed down. A payload net is close by as a feature of the higher trim levels, as are rails to mount baggage bearers on the top.





The 2013 Chevrolet Spark lt for sale has been intended to satisfy all present and future U.s. security necessities, and springs ordinary and not utilizing a less than 10 airbags. It has now not yet been appraised for accident wellbeing by method for either the NHTSA or IIHS. The Spark has not least complex electronic dependability keep watch over and electronically monitored slowing mechanisms, yet moreover doorway seat-cinch pretensioners and same old Hill start help- -a decent trademark for youthful drivers. Outward innovative and insightful is great, together with respectable back three-quarter perceivability over the intention energy's shoulder for switching (no back creative and judicious Polaroid is possible). All Sparks come standard with GM's Onstar gadget and 6 free months of bearer.

quickly for a minicar, all Sparks come typical with air-con, vitality windows, a back window wiper, and a drive pc. Furthermore Chevy contemplated that one methodology to make the Spark appear to be considerably less machine like
Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle EMEA Customer Support Services Excellence Award 2014

The Oracle Instructor - Wed, 2014-09-17 13:54

The corporation announced today that I got the Customer Services Excellence Award 2014 in the category ‘Customer Champion’ for the EMEA region. It is an honor to be listed there together with these excellent professionals that I proudly call colleagues.

CSS Excellence Award 2014


Categories: DBA Blogs

Using the ILOM for Troubleshooting on ODA

Pythian Group - Wed, 2014-09-17 09:25

I worked on root cause analysis for a strange node reboot on client’s Oracle Database Appliance yesterday. The case was quite interesting from the perspective that none of the logs contained any information related to the cause of the reboot. I could only see the log entries for normal activities and then – BOOM! – the start-up sequence! It looked like someone just power cycled the node. I also observed the heartbeat timeouts followed by the node eviction on the remaining node. There was still one place I hadn’t checked and it revealed the cause of the issue.

One of the cool things about ODA is it’s service processor (SP) called Integrated Lights Out Manager (ILOM), which allows you to do many things that you’d normally do being physically located in the data center – power cycle the node, change the BIOS settings, choose boot devices, and … (the drum-roll) … see the console outputs from the server node! And it doesn’t only show the current console output but it keeps logging it too. Each ODA server has its own ILOM, so I found out the IP address for the ILOM of the node which failed and connected to it using SSH.

$ ssh pythian@oda01a-mgmt
Password:

Oracle(R) Integrated Lights Out Manager

Version 3.0.14.13.a r70764

Copyright (c) 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

->
-> ls

 /
    Targets:
        HOST
        STORAGE
        SYS
        SP

    Properties:

    Commands:
        cd
        show

ILOM can be browsed as it would be a directory structure. Here the “Targets” are different components of the system. When you “cd” into a target you see sub-components and so on. Each target can have properties, they are displayed as variable=value pairs under “Properties” section. And there are also list of “Commands” that you can execute for the current target. the “ls” command shows the sub-targets, the properties and the commands for the current target. Here’s how I found the console outputs from the failed node:

-> cd HOST
/HOST

-> ls

 /HOST
    Targets:
        console
        diag

    Properties:
        boot_device = default
        generate_host_nmi = (Cannot show property)

    Commands:
        cd
        set
        show

-> cd console
/HOST/console

-> ls

 /HOST/console
    Targets:
        history

    Properties:
        line_count = 0
        pause_count = 0
        start_from = end

    Commands:
        cd
        show
        start
        stop

-> cd history
/HOST/console/history

-> ls

The last “ls” command started printing all the history of console outputs on my screen and look what I found just before the startup sequence (I removed some lines to make this shorter and I also highlighted the most interesting lines):

divide error: 0000 [#1] SMP
last sysfs file: /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:09.0/0000:1f:00.0/host7/port-7:1/expander-7:1/port-7:1:2/end_device-7:1:2/target7:0:15/7:0:15:0/timeout
CPU 3
Modules linked in: iptable_filter(U) ip_tables(U) x_tables(U) oracleacfs(P)(U) oracleadvm(P)(U) oracleoks(P)(U) mptctl(U) mptbase(U) autofs4(U) hidp(U) l2cap(U) bluetooth(U) rfkill(U) nfs(U) fscache(U) nfs_acl(U) auth_rpcgss(U) lockd(U) sunrpc(U) bonding(U) be2iscsi(U) ib_iser(U) rdma_cm(U) ib_cm(U) iw_cm(U) ib_sa(U) ib_mad(U) ib_core(U) ib_addr(U) iscsi_tcp(U) bnx2i(U) cnic(U) uio(U) dm_round_robin(U) ipv6(U) cxgb3i(U) libcxgbi(U) cxgb3(U) mdio(U) libiscsi_tcp(U) libiscsi(U) scsi_transport_iscsi(U) video(U
) output(U) sbs(U) sbshc(U) parport_pc(U) lp(U) parport(U) ipmi_si(U) ipmi_devintf(U) ipmi_msghandler(U) igb(U) ixgbe(U) joydev(U) ses(U) enclosure(U) e1000e(U) snd_seq_dummy(U) snd_seq_oss(U) snd_seq_midi_event(U) snd_seq(U) snd_seq_device(U) snd_pcm_oss(U) snd_mixer_oss(U) snd_pcm(U) snd_timer(U) snd(U) soundcore(U) snd_page_alloc(U) iTCO_wdt(U) iTCO_vendor_support(U) shpchp(U) i2c_i801(U) i2c_core(U) ioatdma(U) dca(U) pcspkr(U) dm_multipath(U) usb_storage(U) mpt2sas(U) scsi_transport_sas(U) raid_class(U)
 ahci(U) raid1(U) [last unloaded: microcode]
Pid: 29478, comm: top Tainted: P        W  2.6.32-300.11.1.el5uek #1 SUN FIRE X4370 M2 SERVER
RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff8104b3e8>]  [<ffffffff8104b3e8>] thread_group_times+0x5b/0xab
...
Kernel panic - not syncing: Fatal exception
Pid: 29478, comm: top Tainted: P      D W  2.6.32-300.11.1.el5uek #1
Call Trace:
 [<ffffffff8105797e>] panic+0xa5/0x162
 [<ffffffff8107ae09>] ? up+0x39/0x3e
 [<ffffffff810580d1>] ? release_console_sem+0x194/0x19d
 [<ffffffff8105839a>] ? console_unblank+0x6a/0x6f
 [<ffffffff8105764b>] ? print_oops_end_marker+0x23/0x25
 [<ffffffff81456ea6>] oops_end+0xb7/0xc7
 [<ffffffff8101565d>] die+0x5a/0x63
 [<ffffffff8145677c>] do_trap+0x115/0x124
 [<ffffffff81013674>] do_divide_error+0x96/0x9f
 [<ffffffff8104b3e8>] ? thread_group_times+0x5b/0xab
 [<ffffffff810dd2f8>] ? get_page_from_freelist+0x4be/0x65e
 [<ffffffff81012b1b>] divide_error+0x1b/0x20
 [<ffffffff8104b3e8>] ? thread_group_times+0x5b/0xab
 [<ffffffff8104b3d4>] ? thread_group_times+0x47/0xab
 [<ffffffff8116ee13>] ? collect_sigign_sigcatch+0x46/0x5e
 [<ffffffff8116f366>] do_task_stat+0x354/0x8c3
 [<ffffffff81238267>] ? put_dec+0xcf/0xd2
 [<ffffffff81238396>] ? number+0x12c/0x244
 [<ffffffff8107419b>] ? get_pid_task+0xe/0x19
 [<ffffffff811eac34>] ? security_task_to_inode+0x16/0x18
 [<ffffffff8116a77b>] ? task_lock+0x15/0x17
 [<ffffffff8116add1>] ? task_dumpable+0x29/0x3c
 [<ffffffff8116c1c6>] ? pid_revalidate+0x80/0x99
 [<ffffffff81135992>] ? seq_open+0x25/0xba
 [<ffffffff81135a08>] ? seq_open+0x9b/0xba
 [<ffffffff8116d147>] ? proc_single_show+0x0/0x7a
 [<ffffffff81135b2e>] ? single_open+0x8f/0xb8
 [<ffffffff8116aa0e>] ? proc_single_open+0x23/0x3b
 [<ffffffff81127cc1>] ? do_filp_open+0x4f8/0x92d
 [<ffffffff8116f8e9>] proc_tgid_stat+0x14/0x16
 [<ffffffff8116d1a6>] proc_single_show+0x5f/0x7a
 [<ffffffff81135e73>] seq_read+0x193/0x350
 [<ffffffff811ea88c>] ? security_file_permission+0x16/0x18
 [<ffffffff8111a797>] vfs_read+0xad/0x107
 [<ffffffff8111b24b>] sys_read+0x4c/0x70
 [<ffffffff81011db2>] system_call_fastpath+0x16/0x1b
Rebooting in 60 seconds..???

A quick search on My Oracle Support quickly found a match: Kernel Panic at “thread_group_times+0x5b/0xab” (Doc ID 1620097.1)”. The call stack and the massages are a 100% match and the root cause is a kernel bug that’s fixed in more recent versions.
I’m not sure how I would have gotten to the root cause if this system was not an ODA and the server would have just bounced without logging the Kernel Panic in any of the logs. ODA’s ILOM definitely made the troubleshooting effort less painful and probably saved us from couple more incidents caused by this bug in the future as we’d been able to troubleshoot it quicklyand we’ll be able to implement the fix sooner.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle Java Compute Cloud Service Now Available!

Today Oracle added exciting new services to our existing Public Cloud offerings. First Things First It all begins with Oracle Compute Cloud service. It offers Elastic Compute Capacity, where...

We share our skills to maximize your revenue!
Categories: DBA Blogs

ps and top differences with HugePages

Bobby Durrett's DBA Blog - Tue, 2014-09-16 18:09

The Unix utilities ps and top report memory differently with HugePages than without.

Without HugePages ps -eF seems to include the SGA memory under the SZ column:

UID        PID  PPID  C    SZ   RSS PSR STIME TTY          TIME CMD
... 
oracle    1822     1  0 846155 16232  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d000_orcl
oracle    1824     1  0 846155 16228  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d001_orcl
oracle    1826     1  0 846155 16236  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d002_orcl
oracle    1828     1  0 846155 16232  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d003_orcl
oracle    1830     1  0 846155 16224  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d004_orcl
oracle    1832     1  0 846155 16232  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d005_orcl
oracle    1834     1  0 846155 16236  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d006_orcl
oracle    1836     1  0 846155 16228  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d007_orcl
oracle    1838     1  0 846155 16224  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d008_orcl
oracle    1840     1  0 846155 16232  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d009_orcl
oracle    1842     1  0 846155 16240  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d010_orcl
oracle    1844     1  0 846155 16228  0 07:19 ?        00:00:00 ora_d011_orcl
...

Here SZ = 846155 kilobytes = 826 megabytes.  If you add up all the SZ values it comes to 81 gigabytes which wont fit in my 4 gig memory and 4 gig swap.  It seems to include the amount of the SGA actually used, not the full 3 gigabyte max sga size, otherwise the total would have been hundreds of gigabytes.

Doing the same exercise with 3 gigabytes of huge pages ps looks like this:

UID        PID  PPID  C    SZ   RSS PSR STIME TTY          TIME CMD
...
oracle    1809     1  0 59211 15552   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d000_orcl
oracle    1811     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d001_orcl
oracle    1813     1  0 59211 15548   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d002_orcl
oracle    1815     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d003_orcl
oracle    1817     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d004_orcl
oracle    1819     1  0 59211 15548   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d005_orcl
oracle    1821     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d006_orcl
oracle    1823     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d007_orcl
oracle    1825     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d008_orcl
oracle    1827     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d009_orcl
oracle    1829     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d010_orcl
oracle    1831     1  0 59211 15544   0 07:52 ?        00:00:00 ora_d011_orcl
...

SZ = 59211 k= 57 meg.  Total SZ = 5.89 gigabytes.  Still this is bigger than total memory but closer to the 4 gig memory available.  It’s just a guess, but I’m pretty sure that with HugePages this total doesn’t include the amount of memory in use in the SGA in the SZ for each process as it did without HugePages.

The other weird thing is how different top looks with HugePages.  Here is top with the database having just come up without HugePages:

top - 07:20:16 up 3 min,  2 users,  load average: 1.06, 0.33, 0.13
Tasks: 187 total,   1 running, 186 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s):  1.6%us,  6.3%sy,  0.0%ni, 77.8%id, 14.2%wa,  0.0%hi,  0.1%si,  0.0%st
Mem:   4050836k total,   984444k used,  3066392k free,    14460k buffers
Swap:  4095996k total,        0k used,  4095996k free,   450128k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND            
 2010 oracle    20   0 3310m  51m  44m D  7.6  1.3   0:00.21 oracle             
 1988 oracle    20   0 3307m  50m  45m D  3.8  1.3   0:00.21 oracle             
 1794 oracle    -2   0 3303m  15m  13m S  1.9  0.4   0:01.07 oracle

Notice that we have about 3 gigabytes free – 3066392k and nothing in swap.

Here is the same system  with 3 gig of HugePages:

top - 07:53:21 up 2 min,  2 users,  load average: 0.81, 0.29, 0.11
Tasks: 179 total,   1 running, 178 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s):  2.0%us,  8.6%sy,  0.0%ni, 69.2%id, 20.1%wa,  0.0%hi,  0.1%si,  0.0%st
Mem:   4050836k total,  3860100k used,   190736k free,    14332k buffers
Swap:  4095996k total,        0k used,  4095996k free,   239104k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND            
 1781 oracle    -2   0 3303m  15m  13m S  3.5  0.4   0:01.02 oracle             
    1 root      20   0 19400 1520 1220 S  0.0  0.0   0:01.43 init               
    2 root      20   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kthreadd

Now only 190736k is free.  But, note that in both cases top lists the oracle processes with 3300 meg of virtual memory, which is consistent with the 3 gig max sga.

I’ve still got a lot to learn about HugePages but I thought I would pass along these observations.  This article on Oracle’s support site helped me learn about HugePages:

HugePages on Oracle Linux 64-bit (Doc ID 361468.1)

I ended up sizing the HugePages down to 2 gig on my 4 gig test system and reducing sga max size to 2 gig as well.  My system was sluggish with so little free memory when I was using a 3 gig SGA and HugePages.  It was much snappier with only 2 gig tied up in HugePages and dedicated to the SGA, leaving 2 gig for everything else.

This was all done with Oracle’s 64 bit version of Linux and 11.2.0.3 database.

– Bobby

 






Categories: DBA Blogs

Top 7 Reasons Why Oracle Conferences Are A Waste Of Time

Top 7 Reasons Why Oracle Conferences Are A Waste Of Time
Want to turn a lame Oracle Database conference experience into a great one? You may not believe this, but I think Oracle conferences are a waste of time. That is, unless I take action. I've been to hundreds of Oracle conferences, so I'm kind of an expert in this field.

Here is my "Top 7" list about why Oracle conferences are time suckers AND how you can turn them into a GREAT educational, social and networking experience.

Number 7. Sleeper Presentations. You forgot to read that session abstract before you sat down? You're not alone! Here my secret: Sit by the door. But when you walk out, remember that the speaker probably
knows how you feel but is doing they best they can. Out of respect for them and the poor souls who are actually enjoying the session, be quiet when you leave.

Number 6. My System Is Bigger Than Your System. How many times have we all heard someone talking about their, "50 node RAC global system with 5 million active users." Really? Is that even possible? Here are four proven options. Option 1 is to ask a question to shut them up. For example, "So how do you deal with the enqueue contention?" Another option is to simply walk away. If you feel that's rude, then Option 3 is to suddenly grab your phone to answer "that" call and walk away...never to return. If you're feeling feisty then combining Option 2 and 3 is wonderful. Ask the question "So how do you deal with upgrading 50 nodes?" AND THEN suddenly grab your phone and walk away.

Number 5. Not Another New Feature Presentation! Oracle Corporation and their marketing minions love to talk about futures. If you're depressed from hearing about new features you won't get to touch for the next five years, here's what to do. First, remember that Oracle Corporation user group sponsorship is important to user group conferences. Without the help from Oracle, most conferences would not occur. Second, the more Oracle sponsors an event, the more they influence the content. The money source always drives the content. The solution is to look at number of presentations given by non-Oracle employees versus Oracle employees... before you register.

Number 4. Can't Afford It Unless Oracle Sales Pays. Yes you can! I know training and traveling budgets have been cut. What you need is a free pass, right? I figured this one out while still working for Oracle. Submit an abstract to speak. If speaking freaks you out, click HERE. If you won't speak, then volunteer. Believe me when I say, EVERY CONFERENCE NEEDS VOLUNTEERS.

Number 3. Boring Conference. I totally get that. Want to know the secret about boring conferences? Avoid them...unless you take action. My conference of choice is Collaborate/IOUG. I love that conference... because I'm really involved, have been for years and look forward to working with the conference team and seeing them each year. It's kind of like family to me.

Number 2. I Feel Like A Dork. Because I speak a lot, people don't realize that much of the time I feel like a social idiot. Strange, but put me on stage or in a mentoring situation and I'm fine. It's taken me 20 years of conferences to figure this one out. Here's what to do: Go with a colleague or volunteer so you'll always have someone to hang out with. If that doesn't work and you're a guy, look for the stupid games because that's where you'll find DBAs just like you (and me).

Number 1. Stupid Drunks. I get so tired of drunk people yelling in my face! Especially when I can feel the spit from their mouths poke me in the eye. It only took a few years to figure this one out. The solution? Step back a couple of feet. And if that doesn't work, then walk away. Don't worry about offending them, because they won't remember you anyways.

Make It A Great Conference!

There you have it, my "Top 7" list about why Oracle conferences are time suckers AND how you can turn them into a GREAT educational, social and networking experience.

See you at IOUG this April in Las Vegas!

All the best in your Oracle performance work,

Craig.
Categories: DBA Blogs

Benchmark: TokuDB vs. MariaDB / MySQL InnoDB Compression

Pythian Group - Mon, 2014-09-15 09:55

As the amount of data companies are interested in collecting grows, life becomes all the more difficult for IT staff at all levels within an organization. SAS Enterprise storage devices that were once considered giants are now being phased out in favor of SSD Arrays with features such as de-duplication, tape storage has pretty much been abandoned and the same goes without saying for database engines.

For many customers just storing data is not enough because of the CAPEX and OPEX that is involved, smarter ways of storing the same data are required and since databases generally account for the greatest portion of storage requirements across an application stack. Lately they are used not only for storing data but also for storing logs in many cases. IT managers, developers and system administrators very often turn to the DBA and pose the time old question “is there a way we can cut down on the space the database is taking up?” and this question seems to be asked all the more frequently as time goes by.

This is a dilemma that cannot easily be solved for a MySQL DBA. What would the best way to resolve this issue be? Should I cut down on binary logging? Hmm… I need the binary logs in case I need to track down the transactions that have been executed and perform point in time recovery. Perhaps I should have a look at archiving data to disk and then compress this using tar and gzip? Heck if I do that I’ll have to manage and track multiple files and perform countless imports to re-generate the dataset when a report is needed from historical data. Maybe, just maybe, I should look into compressing the data files? This seems like a good idea… that way I can keep all my data, and I can just take advantage of a few extra CPU cycles to keep my data to a reasonable size – or does it?

Inspired by the time old dilemma I decided to take the latest version of TokuDB for test run and compare it to InnoDB compression which has been around a while. Both technologies promise a great reduction in disk usage and even performance benefits – naturally if data resides on a smaller portion of the disk access time and seek time will decrease, however this isn’t applicable to SSD disks that are generally used in the industry today. So I put together a test system using an HP Gen8 Proliant Server with 4x Intel® Xeon® E3 Processors, 4GB ECC RAM & the Samsung EVO SATA III SSD rated at 6G/s and installed the latest version of Ubuntu 14.04 to run some benchmarks. I used the standard innodb-heavy configuration from the support-files directory adding one change – innodb_file_per_table = ON. The reason for this is that TokuDB will not compress the shared tablespace hence this would affect the results of the benchmarks. To be objective I ran the benchmarks both on MySQL and MariaDB using 5.5.38 which is the latest bundled version for TokuDB.

The databases were benchmarked for speed and also for the space consumed by the tpcc-mysql dataset generated with 20 warehouses. So lets first have a look at how much space was needed by TokuDB vs. InnoDB (using both compressed and uncompressed tables):

 

Configuration GB TokuDB  2,7 InnoDB Compressed Tables  4,2 InnoDB Regular Tables  4,8

 

TokuDB was a clear winner here, of course the space savings depend on the type of data stored in the database however with the same dataset it seems TokuDB is in the lead. Seeing such a gain in storage requirements of course will make you wonder how much overhead is incurred in reading and writing this data, so lets have a look at the “tpm-C” to understand how many orders can be processed per minute on each. Here I have also included results for MariaDB vs. MySQL. The first graph shows the amount of orders that were processed per 10 second interval and the second graph shows the total “tpm-C” after the tests were run for 120 seconds:

 

Toku_Maria_MySQL

Figure 1 – Orders processed @ 10 sec interval

 

Interval MariaDB 5.5.38 MariaDB 5.5.38 InnoDB Compressed TokuDB on MariaDB 5.5.38 MySQL 5.5.38 MySQL 5.5.38 InnoDB Compressed TokuDB on MySQL 5.5.38 10 5300 529 5140 5667 83 5477 20 5743 590 5112 5513 767 5935 30 5322 596 4784 5267 792 5931 40 4536 616 4215 5627 774 6107 50 5206 724 5472 5770 489 6020 60 5827 584 5527 5956 402 6211 70 5588 464 5450 6061 761 5999 80 5679 424 5474 5775 789 6029 90 5759 649 5490 6258 788 5998 100 5288 611 5584 6044 765 6026 110 4637 575 4948 5753 720 5314 120 3696 512 4459 930 472 292 Toku_Maria_MySQL_2

Figure 2 - “tpm-C” for 120 test run

MySQL Edition “tpm-C” TokuDB on MySQL 5.5.38 32669.5 MySQL 5.5.38 32310.5 MariaDB 5.5.38 31290.5 TokuDB on MariaDB 5.5.38 30827.5 MySQL 5.5.38 InnoDB Compressed Tables 4151 MariaDB 5.5.38 InnoDB Compressed Tables 3437

 

Surprisingly enough however, the InnoDB table compression results were very low – perhaps this may have shown better results on regular SAS / SATA disks with traditional rotating disks. The impact on performance was incredibly high and the savings on disk space were marginal compared to those of TokuDB so once again again it seems we have a clear winner! TokuDB on MySQL outperformed both MySQL and MariaDB with uncompressed tables. The findings are interesting because in previous benchmarks for older versions of MariaDB and MySQL, MariaDB would generally outperform MySQL however there are many factors should be considered.

These tests were performed on Ubuntu 14.04 while the previous tests I mentioned were performed on CentOS 6.5 and also the hardware was slightly different (Corsair SSD 128GB vs. Samsung EVO 256GB). Please keep in mind these benchmarks reflect the performance on a specific configurations and there are many factors that should be considered when choosing the MySQL / MariaDB edition to use in production.

As per this benchmark, the results for TokuDB were nothing less than impressive and it will be very interesting to see the results on the newer versions of MySQL (5.6) and MariaDB (10)!

Categories: DBA Blogs

Change unknown SYSMAN password on #EM12c

DBASolved - Fri, 2014-09-12 17:52

When I normally start work on a new EM 12c environment, I would request to have a userid created; however, I don’t have a userid in this environment and I need access EM 12c as SYSMAN.  Without knowing the password for SYSMAN, how can I access the EM 12c interface?  The short answer is that I can change the SYSMAN password from the OS where EM 12c is running.

Note:
Before changing the SYSMAN password for EM 12c, make sure to understand the following:

  1. SYSMAN is used by the OMS to login to the OMR to store and query all activity
  2. SYSMAN password has to be changed at both the OMS and OMR to EM 12c to work correctly
  3. Do not modify the SYSMAN or any  other repository user at the OMR level (not recommended)

The steps to change an unknown SYSMAN password is as follows:

Tip: Make sure you know what the SYS password is for the OMR.  It will be needed to reset SYSMAN.

1. Stop all OMS processes

cd <oms home>/bin
emctl stop oms 

Image 1:
sysman_pwd_stop_oms.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Change the SYSMAN password

cd <oms home>/bin
emctl config oms -change_repos_pwd -use_sys_pwd -sys_pwd <sys password> -new_pwd <new sysman password>

In Image 2, notice that I didn’t pass the password for SYS or SYSMAN on the command line.  EMCTL will ask you to provide the password if you don’t put it on the command line.

Image 2:
sysman_pwd_change_pwd.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Stop the Admin Server on the primary OMS and restart OMS

cd <oms home>/bin
emctl stop oms -all
emctl start oms

Image 3:
sysman_pwd_start_oms.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Verify that all of OMS is up and running

cd <oms home>/bin
emctl status oms -details

Image 4:

sysman_pwd_oms_status.png
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After verifying that the OMS is backup, I can now try to login to the OMS interface.

Image 5:
sysman_pwd_oem_access.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we can see, I’m able to access OEM as SYSMAN now with the new SYSMAN password.

Enjoy!!

about.me: http://about.me/dbasolved


Filed under: OEM
Categories: DBA Blogs

Watch: 5 Best Practices for Launching Your Online Video Game

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-12 07:24

Warner Chaves, Principal Consultant at Pythian, has had the privilege of working with several companies on their video game launches, and is best known for his work with the highly anticipated release of an action-adventure video game back in 2013. Through his experience, he’s developed a set of best practices for launching an online video game.

“You don’t want to have angry gamers on the launch of the game because they lost progress in the game,” he says. “Usually at launch, you will have really high peaks of volume, and there might be some pieces of the infrastructure that are not as prepared for that kind of load. There also might be some parts of the game that are actually more popular than what  you expected.”

Watch his latest video below, 5 Best Practices for Launching Your Online Video Game.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Log Buffer #388, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pythian Group - Fri, 2014-09-12 07:22

In order to expand the knowledge about database features of any kind, blogs are inevitable these days. Whether its Oracle, MySQL, or SQL Server blogs writers are contributing like never before and this log buffer edition skims some of it.

Oracle:

The Oracle Utilities family of products use Oracle standard technology such as the Oracle Database and Oracle Fusion Middleware (a.k.a. Oracle WebLogic).

OBIEE SampleApp in The Cloud: Importing VirtualBox Machines to AWS EC2.

The default value for the INMEMORY_MAX_POPULATE_SERVERS parameter is derived from the PGA_AGGREGATE_LIMIT parameter.

Most customers of Oracle Enterprise Manager using JVM Diagnostics use the tool to monitor their Java Applications servers like Weblogic, Websphere, Tomcat, etc.

Taking Enterprise File Exchange to the Next Level with Oracle Managed File Transfer 12c.

SQL Server:

The concept of a synonym was introduced in SQL Server 2005. Synonyms are very simple database objects, but have the potential to save a lot of time and work if implemented with a little bit of thought.

This article summarizes the factors to consider and provide an overview of various options for HA and DR in cloud based SQL Server deployments.

Chris Date is famous for his writings on relational theory. Chris took on the role of communicating and teaching Codd’s relational theory, and reluctantly admits to a role in establishing SQL as the dominant relational language.

Introduction of how to design a star schema dimensional model for new BI developers.

Have you ever wondered why the transaction log file grows bigger and bigger? What caused it to happen? How do you control it? How does the recovery model of a database control the growing size of the transaction log? Read on to learn the answers.

MySQL:

A common migration path from standalone MySQL/Percona Server to a Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) environment involves some measure of time where one node in the new cluster has been configured as a slave of the production master that the cluster is slated to replace.

How to shrink the ibdata file by transporting tables with Trite.

OpenStack users shed light on Percona XtraDB Cluster deadlock issues.

There are a lot of tools that generate test data.  Many of them have complex XML scripts or GUI interfaces that let you identify characteristics about the data. For testing query performance and many other applications, however, a simple quick and dirty data generator which can be constructed at the MySQL command line is useful.

How to calculate the correct size of Percona XtraDB Cluster’s gcache.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Virtual Circuit Wait

Bobby Durrett's DBA Blog - Thu, 2014-09-11 15:28

On Monday we had some performance problems on a system that includes a database which uses shared servers.  The top wait was “virtual circuit wait”.  Here are the top 5 events for a 52 minute time frame:

Top 5 Timed Foreground Events

Event Waits Time(s) Avg wait (ms) % DB time Wait Class virtual circuit wait 1,388,199 17,917 13 50.98 Network db file sequential read 1,186,933 9,252 8 26.33 User I/O log file sync 1,185,620 6,429 5 18.29 Commit DB CPU 5,964 16.97 enq: TX – row lock contention 391 586 1499 1.67 Application

From other monitoring tools there was no sign of poor performance from the database end but virtual circuit wait is not normally the top wait during peak times.  Overall for the time period of this AWR report the shared servers didn’t seem busy:

Shared Servers Utilization Total Server Time (s) %Busy %Idle Incoming Net % Outgoing Net % 111,963 38.49 61.51 15.99 0.01

We have seen virtual circuit waits ever since we upgraded to 11g on this system so I wanted to learn more about what causes it.  These two Oracle support documents were the most helpful:

Troubleshooting: Virtual Circuit Waits (Doc ID 1415999.1)

Bug 5689608: INACTIVE SESSION IS NOT RELEASING SHARED SERVER PROCESS (closed as not bug)

Evidently when you return a cursor from a package and the cursor includes a sort step a shared server will be hung up in a virtual circuit wait state from the time the cursor is first fetched until the application closes the cursor.  Our application uses cursors in this way so it stands to reason that our virtual circuit wait times we saw in our AWR report represent the time it took for our web servers to fetch from the cursors and close them, at least for the cursors that included sort steps.  So, if our web servers slow down due to some other issue they could potentially take longer to fetch from and close the affected cursors and this could result in higher virtual circuit wait times.

Here is a zip of a test script I ran and its output: zip

I took the test case documented in bug 5689608 and added queries to v$session_wait to show the current session’s virtual circuit waits.

Here are the first steps of the test case:

CREATE TABLE TEST AS SELECT * FROM DBA_OBJECTS; 
     
create or replace package cursor_package as
cursor mycursor is select * from test order by object_name;
end;
/
       
begin
 open cursor_package.mycursor;
end;
/
 
create or replace procedure test_case is
l_row TEST%rowtype;
begin
if cursor_package.mycursor%isopen then
fetch cursor_package.mycursor into l_row;
end if;
end;
/

These steps do the following:

  1. Create a test table
  2. Create a package with a cursor that includes an order by to force a sort
  3. Open the cursor
  4. Create a procedure to fetch the first row from the cursor

At this point I queried v$session_wait and found no waits:

SQL> select * from v$session_event
  2  where sid=
  3  (SELECT sid from v$session where audsid=USERENV('SESSIONID')) 
     and
  4  event='virtual circuit wait';

no rows selected

The next step of the test case fetched the first row and then I queried and found the first wait:

SQL> exec test_case;

SQL> select * from v$session_event
  2  where sid=
  3  (SELECT sid from v$session where audsid=USERENV('SESSIONID')) 
     and
  4  event='virtual circuit wait';

       SID EVENT                          TIME_WAITED
---------- --------------------------------------------------------
       783 virtual circuit wait           0

Note that time_waited is 0 which means the time was less than one hundredth of a second.  Next I made my sqlplus client sleep for five seconds using a host command and looked at the wait again:

SQL> host sleep 5

SQL> select * from v$session_event
  2  where sid=
  3  (SELECT sid from v$session where audsid=USERENV('SESSIONID')) 
     and
  4  event='virtual circuit wait';

       SID EVENT                             TIME_WAITED
---------- --------------------------------------------------------
       783 virtual circuit wait              507

Total time is now 507 centiseconds = 5 seconds, same as the sleep time.  So, the time for the virtual circuit wait includes the time after the client does the first fetch, even if the client is idle.  Next I closed the cursor and slept another 5 seconds:

SQL> begin
  2   close cursor_package.mycursor;
  3  end;
  4  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

Elapsed: 00:00:00.01
SQL> 
SQL> host sleep 5

SQL> 
SQL> select * from v$session_event
  2  where sid=
  3  (SELECT sid from v$session where audsid=USERENV('SESSIONID')) 
     and
  4  event='virtual circuit wait';

       SID EVENT                                 TIME_WAITED
---------- --------------------------------------------------------
       783 virtual circuit wait                  509

The time waited is still just about 5 seconds so the clock stops on the virtual circuit wait after the sqlplus script closes the cursor.  If the session was still waiting on virtual circuit wait after the close of the cursor the time would have been 10 seconds.

This was all new to me.  Even though we have plenty of shared servers to handle the active sessions we still see virtual circuit waits.  These waits correspond to time on the clients fetching from and closing cursors from called packages.  As a result, these wait times represent time outside of the database and not time spent within the database.  These waits tie up shared servers but as long as they are short enough and you have shared servers free they don’t represent a problem.

– Bobby

p.s. This is on hp-ux 11.31 ia64 Oracle 11.2.0.3

 

 












Categories: DBA Blogs

2002 Honda passport timing belt replacement

Ameed Taylor - Wed, 2014-09-10 19:14
The Honda Passport was a activity-utility car bought via the japanese maker from 1994 through 2002. It used to be changed in 2003 through the Honda Pilot, a crossover utility automobile that shared one of the most underpinnings of the Honda Odyssey minivan. not like the Pilot, which adopted the lead of the Toyota Highlander in placing a mid-dimension crossover body on the underpinnings of what used to be basically a car, the Passport was once constructed on a rear-wheel-power truck chassis with all-wheel force as an choice. The experience quality and coping with reflected its truck origins, so the Pilot was a striking step ahead when it replaced the Passport.

The Passport was once actually a re-badged Isuzu Rodeo, a truck-based SUV inbuilt Indiana, at a plant that Subaru and Isuzu shared on the time. the primary era Passport, sold from 1994 via 1997, offered a collection of a one hundred twenty-horsepower 2.6-liter four-cylinder engine, paired with a 5-pace handbook gearbox, or a a hundred seventy five-hp 3.2-liter V-6--and an available four-pace automated transmission. Rear-wheel power was same old, and all-wheel pressure might be ordered as an choice. Trim ranges have been base and EX.
2002 honda passport check engine light flashingIn 1998, a 2nd-era Passport used to be introduced. It used to be still based on a truck chassis, nevertheless it came with extra relief and safety options than the earlier adaptation, and was considerably extra refined. The 4-door game-utility vehicle came usual with a 205-hp three.2-liter V-6, matched with a 5-speed guide gearbox on base versions, though a four-speed computerized transmission was additionally on hand.

The second Passport was once offered in two trim ranges: the LX will be ordered with the 5-velocity guide, with four-wheel-pressure as an possibility, and the extra upscale EX came with the 4-velocity automatic, once more with both force possibility. while the spare tire on the base LX was established on a swinging bracket on the tailgate, the EX relocated it to a service beneath the cargo house. For the 2000 version year, the Honda Passport received a handful of updates, together with non-compulsory 16-inch wheels on the LX and available two-tone paint treatments.
2002 honda passport transmission dipstick locationWhen taking into account the Passport as a used car, patrons should comprehend that the 1998-2002 models have been recalled in October 2010 as a result of body corrosion in the basic house where the rear suspension was mounted. Any autos with out seen corrosion have been handled with a rust-resistant compound, but reinforcement brackets were to be installed in those with more extreme rust. In some cases, the damage was once so extreme that Honda simply repurchased the autos from their homeowners. Used-automotive shoppers taking a look at Passports must be sure to in finding out whether the car had been via a remember, and what--if anything else--was achieved.
2002 honda passport keyless remote
2002 honda passport o2 sensor location
2002 honda passport picture gallery
2002 honda passport transmission problems
2002 honda passport starter replacement
Categories: DBA Blogs